414 Works

Data from: Comparative analyses of reproductive structures in harvestmen (Opiliones) reveal multiple transitions from courtship to precopulatory antagonism

Mercedes M. Burns, Marshal Hedin & Jeffrey W. Shultz
Explaining the rapid, species-specific diversification of reproductive structures and behaviors is a long-standing goal of evolutionary biology, with recent research tending to attribute reproductive phenotypes to the evolutionary mechanisms of female mate choice or intersexual conflict. Progress in understanding these and other possible mechanisms depends, in part, on reconstructing the direction, frequency and relative timing of phenotypic evolution of male and female structures in species-rich clades. Here we examine evolution of reproductive structures in the...

Data from: Phylogenetic conservatism in plant phenology

T. Jonathan Davies, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Nathan J. B. Kraft, Nicolas Salamin, Jenica M. Allen, Toby R. Ault, Julio L. Betancourt, Kjell Bolmgren, Elsa E. Cleland, Benjamin I. Cook, Theresa M. Crimmins, Susan J. Mazer, Gregory J. McCabe, Stephanie Pau, Jim Regetz, Mark D. Schwartz & Steven E. Travers
Phenological events – defined points in the life cycle of a plant or animal – have been regarded as highly plastic traits, reflecting flexible responses to various environmental cues. The ability of a species to track, via shifts in phenological events, the abiotic environment through time might dictate its vulnerability to future climate change. Understanding the predictors and drivers of phenological change is therefore critical. Here, we evaluated evidence for phylogenetic conservatism – the tendency...

Data from: Nutrient presses and pulses differentially impact plants, herbivores, detritivores and their natural enemies

Shannon M. Murphy, Gina M. Wimp, Danny Lewis & Robert F. Denno
Anthropogenic nutrient inputs into native ecosystems cause fluctuations in resources that normally limit plant growth, which has important consequences for associated food webs. Such inputs from agricultural and urban habitats into nearby natural systems are increasing globally and can be highly variable, spanning the range from sporadic to continuous. Despite the global increase in anthropogenically-derived nutrient inputs into native ecosystems, the consequences of variation in subsidy duration on native plants and their associated food webs...

Data from: Effects of exposure to pile driving sounds on the lake sturgeon, Nile tilapia, and hogchoker

Michele B. Halvorsen, Brandon M. Casper, Frazer Matthews, Thomas J. Carlson & Arthur N. Popper
Pile driving and other impulsive sound sources have the potential to injure or kill fishes. One mechanism that produces injuries is the rapid motion of the walls of the swim bladder as it repeatedly contacts nearby tissues. To further understand the involvement of the swim bladder in tissue damage a specially-designed wave tube was used to expose three species to pile driving sounds. Species included lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvecens) with an open (physoclistous) swim bladder,...

Data from: Estimation of effective population size in continuously distributed populations: there goes the neighborhood

Maile C. Neel, Kevin McKelvey, Robin S. Waples, Nils Ryman, Michael W. Lloyd, Ruth Short Bull, Fred W. Allendorf & Michael K. Schwartz
Use of genetic methods to estimate effective population size (N^e) is rapidly increasing, but all approaches make simplifying assumptions unlikely to be met in real populations. In particular, all assume a single, unstructured population, and none has been evaluated for use with continuously distributed species. We simulated continuous populations with local mating structure, as envisioned by Wright's concept of neighborhood size (NS), and evaluated performance of a single-sample estimator based on linkage disequilibrium (LD), which...

Data from: \"Complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes for the jack species Caranx ignobilis (Forsskål, 1775) and C. melampygus (Cuvier, 1833) (Perciformes:Carangidae) from the High Hawaiian Islands\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 October 2013 – 30 November 2013

Scott R. Santos
Complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes for the jack species Caranx ignobilis (Forsskål, 1775) and C. melampygus (Cuvier, 1833) (Perciformes:Carangidae) from the High Hawaiian Islands are presented along with annotation and characterization of intragenomic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and indel variation.

Data from: Rapid evolution of asymmetric reproductive incompatibilities in stalk-eyed flies

Emily G. Rose, Cara L. Brand & Gerald S. Wilkinson
The steps by which isolated populations acquire reproductive incompatibilities remain poorly understood. One potentially important process is postcopulatory sexual selection because it can generate divergence between populations in traits that influence fertilization success after copulation. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of this form of reproductive isolation by conducting reciprocal crosses between variably diverged populations of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni). First, we measure seven types of reproductive incompatibility between copulation and fertilization. We then compare...

Data from: The effects of synthetic estrogen exposure on pre-mating and post-mating episodes of selection in sex-role-reversed Gulf pipefish

Emily Rose, Kimberly A. Paczolt & Adam G. Jones
Environmental estrogens have been shown to affect populations of aquatic organisms in devastating ways, including feminization of males, alterations in mating behaviors, and disruption of sexual selection. Studies have shown 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) exposure to induce female-like secondary sexual traits in male Gulf pipefish, changing how females perceive affected males. We aimed to understand the effects of EE2 exposure on the sex-role-reversed mating system and the strength of selection in Gulf pipefish. We used artificial Gulf...

Data from: Social learning of migratory performance

Thomas Mueller, Robert B. O’Hara, Sarah J. Converse, Richard P. Urbanek & William F. Fagan
Successful bird migration can depend on individual learning, social learning, and innate navigation programs. Using 8 years of data on migrating whooping cranes, we were able to partition genetic and socially learned aspects of migration. Specifically, we analyzed data from a reintroduced population wherein all birds were captive bred and artificially trained by ultralight aircraft on their first lifetime migration. For subsequent migrations, in which birds fly individually or in groups but without ultralight escort,...

Data from: Ecological effects on metabolic scaling amphipod responses to fish predators in freshwater springs

Douglas S. Glazier, Eric M. Butler, Sara A. Lombardi, Travis J. Deptola, Andrew J. Reese & Erin V. Satterthwaite
Metabolic rate is commonly thought to scale with body mass to the 3/4-power as a result of universal body-design constraints. However, recent comparative work has shown that the metabolic scaling slope may vary significantly among species and higher taxa, apparently in response to different lifestyles and ecological conditions, though the precise mechanisms involved are not well understood. To better understand these under-appreciated ecological effects and their causes, it is important to control for extraneous phylogenetic...

Data from: Species delimitation in fungal endophyte diversity studies and its implications in ecological and biogeographic inferences

Romina Gazis, Stephen Rehner & Priscila Chaverri
The estimation of species diversity in fungal endophyte communities is based either on species counts or the assignment of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Consequently, the application of different species recognition criteria affects not only diversity estimates but also the ecological hypotheses that arise from those observations. The main objective of the study was to examine how the choice and number of genetic markers and species delimitation criteria influences biodiversity estimates. Here, we compare approaches to...

Data from: A novel mechanism for grazing lawn formation: large herbivore-induced modification of the plant-soil water balance

Michiel P. Veldhuis, Ruth A. Howison, Rienk W. Fokkema, Elske Tielens & Han Olff
1. Large herbivores play a key-role in creating spatial heterogeneity through the formation of grazing lawns. Recent research suggests that the currently accepted nutrient-based theory on the formation of these grazing lawns cannot universally explain their formation in all ecosystems where they are found. 2. We developed and investigated an alternative hypothesis on grazing lawn formation and maintenance based on herbivore effects on the plant-soil water balance. We propose that large herbivores change the soil...

Data from: Emerging Representational Geometries in the Visual System Predict Reaction Times for Object Categorization

J. Brendan Ritchie, David A. Tovar & Thomas A. Carlson
Recognizing an object takes just a fraction of a second, less than the blink of an eye. Applying multivariate pattern analysis, or "brain decoding", methods to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data has allowed researchers to characterize, in high temporal resolution, the emerging representation of objects that underlie our capacity for rapid recognition. Shortly after stimulus onset, exemplar stimuli cluster by category in high-dimensional activation spaces. In these emerging activation spaces, the decodability of exemplar category varies over...

Data from: Host-adapted aphid populations differ in their migratory patterns and capacity to colonize crops

Sanford D. Eigenbrode, Thomas S. Davis, Jennifer R. Adams, Lisette P. Waits, David Hawthorne & Damon S. Husebye
Although phytophagous insects can vary genetically in host use and exhibit long-range movements, the combined implications of these phenomena for pest management have received limited attention. To address this, we surveyed the genetic diversity of pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum using twelve microsatellite loci and assessed host association patterns and annual movement from a putative source region (Columbia River Basin) to the Palouse region of northern Idaho and western Washington, where the aphid is a pest...

Data from: Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity

Brian C. O'Meara, Stacey D. Smith, W. Scott Armbruster, Lawrence D. Harder, Christopher R. Hardy, Lena C. Hileman, Larry Hufford, Amy Litt, Susana Magallon, Stephen A. Smith, Peter F. Stevens, Charles B. Fenster & Pamela K. Diggle
Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction), and...

Data from: Effects of fertilizer on inorganic soil N in East Africa maize systems: vertical distributions and temporal dynamics

Katherine L. Tully, Jonathan Hickman, Madeline McKenna, Christopher Neill & Cheryl A. Palm
Fertilizer applications are poised to increase across sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the fate of added nitrogen (N) is largely unknown. We measured vertical distributions and temporal variations of soil inorganic N following fertilizer application in two maize (Zea mays L.)-growing regions of contrasting soil type. Fertilizer trials were established on a clayey soil in Yala, Kenya, and on a sandy soil in Tumbi, Tanzania, with application rates of 0–200 kg N/ha/yr. Soil profiles were collected...

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Chemodiversity of dissolved organic matter in the Amazon Basin

Michael Gonsior, Juliana Valle, Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin, Norbert Hertkorn, David Bastviken, Jenna Luek, Mourad Harir, Wanderley Bastos & Alex Enrich-Prast
Regions in the Amazon Basin have been associated with specific biogeochemical processes, but a detailed chemical classification of the abundant and ubiquitous dissolved organic matter (DOM), beyond specific indicator compounds and bulk measurements, has not yet been established. We sampled water from different locations in the Negro, Madeira/Jamari and Tapajós River areas to characterize the molecular DOM composition and distribution. Ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) combined with excitation emission matrix (EEM)...

Data from: Geographic origins and population genetics of bats killed at wind-energy facilities

Cortney L. Pylant, David M. Nelson, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, J. Edward Gates & Stephen R. Keller
An unanticipated impact of wind-energy development has been large-scale mortality of insectivorous bats. In eastern North America, where mortality rates are among the highest in the world, the hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) and the eastern red bat (L. borealis) comprise the majority of turbine-associated bat mortality. Both species are migratory tree bats with widespread distributions; however, little is known regarding the geographic origins of bats killed at wind-energy facilities or the diversity and population structure...

Data from: A quantitative framework for investigating risk of deadly collisions between marine wildlife and boats

Julien Martin, Quentin Sabatier, Timothy A. Gowan, Christophe Giraud, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Scott Calleson, Joel G. Ortega-Ortiz, Charles J. Deutsch, Athena Rycyk & Stacie M. Koslovsky
Speed regulations of watercraft in protected areas are designed to reduce lethal collisions with wildlife but can have economic consequences. We present a quantitative framework for investigating the risk of deadly collisions between boats and wildlife. We apply encounter rate theory to demonstrate how marine mammal-boat encounter rate can be used to predict the expected number of deaths associated with management scenarios. We illustrate our approach with management scenarios for two endangered species: the Florida...

Data from: A rotational cylindrical fMRI phantom for image quality control

Sunder S. Rajan & Wang Zhan
Purpose: A novel phantom for image quality testing for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans is described. Methods: The cylindrical, rotatable, ~4.5L phantom, with eight wedge-shaped compartments, is used to simulate rest and activated states. The compartments contain NiCl2 doped agar gel with alternating concentrations of agar (1.4%, 1.6%) to produce T1 and T2 values approximating brain grey matter. The Jacard index was used to compare the image distortions for echo planar imaging (EPI) and...

Data from: The effect of demographic correlations on the stochastic population dynamics of perennial plants

Aldo Compagnoni, Andrew J. Bibian, Brad M. Ochocki, Haldre S. Rogers, Emily L. Schultz, Michelle E. Sneck, Bret D. Elderd, Amy M. Iler, David W. Inouye, Hans Jacquemyn, Tom E.X. Miller & Tom E. X. Miller
Understanding the influence of environmental variability on population dynamics is a fundamental goal of ecology. Theory suggests that, for populations in variable environments, temporal correlations between demographic vital rates (e.g., growth, survival, reproduction) can increase (if positive) or decrease (if negative) the variability of year-to-year population growth. Because this variability generally decreases long-term population viability, vital rate correlations may importantly affect population dynamics in stochastic environments. Despite long-standing theoretical interest, it is unclear whether vital...

Data from: The role of transcriptomes linked with responses to light environment on seedling mortality in a subtropical forest, China

Baocai Han, Maria Natalia Umana, Xiangcheng Mi, Xiaojuan Liu, Lei Chen, Yunquan Wang, Yu Liang, Wei Wei & Keping Ma
Differences in seedling survival in trees have a lasting imprint on seedling, juvenile and adult community structure. Identifying the drivers of these differences, therefore, is a critical research objective that ultimately requires knowledge regarding how organismal function interacts with the local environment to influence survival rates. In tree communities, differences in light use strategies are frequently invoked to explain differences in seedling demographic performance through growth and survival trade-offs. For example, shade-tolerant species grow slowly...

Data from: The opsin genes of Amazonian cichlids

Daniel Escobar-Camacho, Erica Ramos, Cesar Martins & Karen L. Carleton
Vision is a critical sense for organismal survival with visual sensitivities strongly shaped by the environment. Some freshwater fishes with a Gondwanan origin are distributed in both South American rivers including the Amazon, as well as African rivers and lakes. These different habitats likely required adaptations to murky and clear environments. In this study, we compare the molecular basis of Amazonian and African cichlid fishes’ visual systems. We used next generation sequencing of genomes and...

Data from: Multiresponse algorithms for community-level modeling: review of theory, applications, and comparison to species distribution models

Diego Nieto-Lugilde, Katlin C. Maguire, Jessica L. Blois, John W. Williams, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick & Kaitlin C. Maguire
1.Community-level models (CLMs) consider multiple, co-occurring species in model fitting and are lesser known alternatives to species distribution models (SDMs) for analyzing and predicting biodiversity patterns. CLMs simultaneously model multiple species, including rare species, while reducing overfitting and implicitly considering drivers of co-occurrence. Many CLMs are direct extensions of well-known SDMs and therefore should be familiar to ecologists. However, CLMs remain underutilized, and there have been few tests of their potential benefits and no systematic...

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