188 Works

Ecological impacts of pesticide seed treatments on arthropod communities in a grain crop rotation

Aditi Dubey, Margaret Lewis, Galen Dively & Kelly Hamby
1. While many studies have investigated non-target impacts of neonicotinoid seed treatments (NSTs), they usually take place within a single crop and focus on specific pest or beneficial arthropod taxa. 2. We compared the impacts of three seed treatments to an untreated control: imidacloprid + fungicide products, thiamethoxam + fungicide products, and fungicide products alone in a three-year crop rotation of full-season soybean, winter wheat, double-cropped soybean and maize. Specifically, we quantified neonicotinoid residues in...

Data from: Bee phenology is predicted by climatic variation and functional traits

Michael Stemkovski, Will Pearse, Sean Griffin, Gabriella Pardee, Jason Gibbs, Terry Griswold, John Neff, Ryan Oram, Molly RightMyer, Cory Sheffield, Karen Wright, Brian Inouye, David Inouye & Rebecca Irwin
Climate change is shifting the environmental cues that determine the phenology of interacting species. Plant-pollinator systems may be susceptible to temporal mismatch if bees and flowering plants differ in their phenological responses to warming temperatures. While the cues that trigger flowering are well-understood, little is known about what determines bee phenology. Using Generalized Additive Models, we analyzed time-series data representing 67 bee species collected over nine years in the Colorado Rocky Mountains to perform the...

Data from: Restoration as mitigation: analysis of stream mitigation for coal mining impacts in southern Appalachia

Margaret A. Palmer & Kelly Lynn Hondula
Compensatory mitigation is commonly used to replace aquatic natural resources being lost or degraded but little is known about the success of stream mitigation. This article presents a synthesis of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from annual monitoring reports indicate that the ratio of lengths of stream impacted to lengths of stream mitigation projects were < 1 for many projects, and most mitigation was implemented...

Data from: Trade-offs in parasitism efficiency and brood size mediate parasitoid coexistence, with implications for biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer

Xiao-Yi Wang, David E. Jennings & Jian J. Duan
1. Parasitoids often are selected for use as biological control agents because of their high host specificity, yet such host specificity can result in strong interspecific competition. Few studies have examined whether and how various extrinsic factors (such as parasitism efficiency, i.e. the ability to optimize host-finding attack rates) influence the outcome of competition between parasitoids, even though they could have profound effects on the implementation of classical biological control programmes. 2. To determine the...

Data from: Divergence in calls but not songs in the orchard oriole complex: Icterus spurius and I. fuertesi

Rachel J. Sturge, Kevin E. Omland, J. Jordan Price & Bernard Lohr
Birdsong has important functions in attracting and competing for mates, and song characteristics are thought to diverge rapidly during the process of speciation. In contrast, other avian vocalizations that may have non-reproductive functions, such as calls, are thought to be more evolutionarily conserved and may diverge more slowly among taxa. This study examines differences in both male song and an acoustically simpler vocalization, the ‘jeet’ call, between two closely related taxa, Icterus spurius and I....

Data from: Evolutionary relatedness does not predict competition and co-occurrence in natural or experimental communities of green algae

Markos A. Alexandrou, John D. Hall, Charles F. Delwiche, Bradley J. Cardinale, Keith Fritschie, Bastian Bentlage, Anita Narwani, Patrick A. Venail, M. Sabrina Pankey & Todd H. Oakley
The competition-relatedness hypothesis (CRH) predicts that the strength of competition is the strongest among closely related species and decreases as species become less related. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that common ancestry causes close relatives to share biological traits that lead to greater ecological similarity. Although intuitively appealing, the extent to which phylogeny can predict competition and co-occurrence among species has only recently been rigorously tested, with mixed results. When studies have failed...

Data from: Cattle sex-specific recombination and genetic control from a large pedigree analysis

Li Ma, Jeffrey R. O'Connell, Paul M. Vanraden, Botong Shen, Abinash Padhi, Chuanyu Sun, Derek M. Bickhart, John B. Cole, Daniel J. Null, George E. Liu, Yang Da & George R. Wiggans
Meiotic recombination is an essential biological process that generates genetic diversity and ensures proper segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. From a large USDA dairy cattle pedigree with over half million genotyped animals, we extracted 186,927 three-generation families, identified over 8.5 million maternal and paternal recombination events, and constructed sex-specific recombination maps for 59,309 autosomal SNPs. The recombination map spans for 25.5 Morgans in males and 23.2 Morgans in females, for a total studied region of...

Data from: Can observation skills of citizen scientists be estimated using species accumulation curves?

Steve Kelling, Alison Johnston, Wesley M. Hochachka, Marshall Iliff, Daniel Fink, Jeff Gerbracht, Carl Lagoze, Frank A. La Sorte, Travis Moore, Andrea Wiggins, Weng-Keen Wong, Chris Wood & Jun Yu
Volunteers are increasingly being recruited into citizen science projects to collect observations for scientific studies. An additional goal of these projects is to engage and educate these volunteers. Thus, there are few barriers to participation resulting in volunteer observers with varying ability to complete the project’s tasks. To improve the quality of a citizen science project’s outcomes it would be useful to account for inter-observer variation, and to assess the rarely tested presumption that participating...

Data from: How many routes lead to migration? Comparison of methods to assess and characterise migratory movements

Francesca Cagnacci, Stefano Focardi, Anne Ghisla, Bram Van Moorter, Eliezer Gurarie, Marco Heurich, Atle Mysterud, John Linnell, Manuela Panzacchi, Evelyn Merrill, Roel May, Torgeir Nygård, Christer Rolandsen, Mark Hebblewhite & Evelyn H. Merrill
1. Decreasing rate of migration in several species as a consequence of climate change and anthropic pressure, together with increasing evidence of space-use strategies intermediate between residency and complete migration, are very strong motivations to evaluate migration occurrence and features in animal populations. 2. The main goal of this paper was to perform a relative comparison between methods for identifying and characterising migration at the individual and population level on the basis of animal location...

Data from: Testing the role of ecology and life history in structuring genetic variation across a landscape: a trait-based phylogeographic approach

Andrea Paz, Roberto Ibáñez, Karen R. Lips & Andrew J. Crawford
Hypotheses to explain phylogeographic structure traditionally invoke geographic features, but often fail to provide a general explanation for spatial patterns of genetic variation. Organisms' intrinsic characteristics might play more important roles than landscape features in determining phylogeographic structure. We developed a novel comparative approach to explore the role of ecological and life-history variables in determining spatial genetic variation and tested it on frog communities in Panama. We quantified spatial genetic variation within 31 anuran species...

Data from: In-solution hybridization for mammalian mitogenome enrichment: pros, cons and challenges associated with multiplexing degraded DNA

Melissa T. R. Hawkins, Courtney A. Hofman, Taylor Callicrate, Molly M. McDonough, Mirian T. N. Tsuchiya, Eliécer E. Gutierrez, Kristofer M. Helgen & Jesús E. Maldonado
Here, we present a set of RNA-based probes for whole mitochondrial genome in-solution enrichment, targeting a diversity of mammalian mitogenomes. This probes set was designed from seven mammalian orders and tested to determine the utility for enriching degraded DNA. We generated 63 mitogenomes representing five orders and 22 genera of mammals that yielded varying coverage ranging from 0 to >5400X. Based on a threshold of 70% mitogenome recovery and at least 10× average coverage, 32...

Data from: The Yin and the Yang of Prediction: an fMRI study of semantic predictive processing

Kirsten Weber, Ellen F. Lau, Benjamin Stillerman & Gina R. Kuperberg
Probabilistic prediction plays a crucial role in language comprehension. When predictions are fulfilled, the resulting facilitation allows for fast, efficient processing of ambiguous, rapidly-unfolding input; when predictions are not fulfilled, the resulting error signal allows us to adapt to broader statistical changes in this input. We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to examine the neuroanatomical networks engaged in semantic predictive processing and adaptation. We used a relatedness proportion semantic priming paradigm, in which we manipulated...

Data from: Prairie dogs increase fitness by killing interspecific competitors

John L. Hoogland & Charles R. Brown
Interspecific competition commonly selects for divergence in ecology, morphology, or physiology, but direct observation of interspecific competition under natural conditions is difficult. Herbivorous white-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus) employ an unusual strategy to reduce interspecific competition: they kill, but do not consume, herbivorous Wyoming ground squirrels (Urocitellus elegans) encountered in the prairie dog territories. Results from a 6-year study in Colorado USA revealed that interspecific killing (IK) of ground squirrels by prairie dogs was common,...

Data from: Rediscovery of the enigmatic fungus-farming ant \"Mycetosoritis\" asper Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): Implications for taxonomy, phylogeny, and the evolution of agriculture in ants

Jeffrey Sosa-Calvo, Ana Ješovnik, Heraldo L. Vasconcelos, , Ted R. Schultz & Mauricio Bacci
We report the rediscovery of the exceedingly rarely collected and enigmatic fungus-farming ant species Mycetosoritis asper. Since the description of the type specimen in 1887, only four additional specimens are known to have been added to the world's insect collections. Its biology is entirely unknown and its phylogenetic position within the fungus-farming ants has remained puzzling due to its aberrant morphology. In 2014 we excavated and collected twenty-one colonies of M. asper in the Floresta...

Data from: Fine-scale temporal analysis of genotype-dependent mortality at settlement in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

Louis V. Plough
Settlement and metamorphosis mark a critical transition in the life cycle of marine invertebrates, during which substantial mortality occurs in both field and laboratory settings. Previous pair-crossing experiments with the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas have revealed significant selective or genotype-dependent mortality around the metamorphic transition, but the fine-scale nature and timing of this mortality is not known, particularly whether it occurs before, during or after metamorphosis. In this laboratory study, microsatellite marker segregation ratios were...

Data from: Adult plasticity in African Cichlids: rapid changes in opsin expression in response to environmental light differences

Sri Pratima Nandamuri, Miranda R. Yourick & Karen L. Carleton
Phenotypic plasticity allows organisms to adapt quickly to local environmental conditions and could facilitate adaptive radiations. Cichlids have recently undergone an adaptive radiation in Lake Malawi where they inhabit diverse light environments and tune their visual sensitivity through differences in cone opsin expression. While cichlid opsin expression is known to be plastic over development, whether adults remain plastic is unknown. Adult plasticity in visual tuning could play a role in cichlid radiations by enabling survival...

Data from: Disassembly of a tadpole community by a multi-host fungal pathogen with limited evidence of recovery

Graziella V. DiRenzo, Christian Che-Castaldo, Amanda Rugenski, Roberto Brenes, Matt R. Whiles, Catherine M. Pringle, Susan S. Kilham & Karen R. Lips
Emerging infectious diseases can cause host community disassembly, but the mechanisms driving the order of species declines and extirpations following a disease outbreak are unclear. We documented the community disassembly of a Neotropical tadpole community during a chytridiomycosis outbreak, triggered by the generalist fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Within the first 11 months of Bd arrival, tadpole density and occupancy rapidly declined. Rarity, in terms of tadpole occupancy and adult relative abundance, did not predict...

Data from: Population genomic analysis of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus using genotyping-by-sequencing

Louis V. Plough
Previous genetic studies of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts have reported weak or temporally variable spatial structure, suggesting high gene flow among distant populations possibly facilitated by long-distance larval dispersal or other features of blue crab life history. The use of relatively few genetic markers, however, may have limited power to detect subtle but significant structure that could inform fisheries management. In this study, the potential for genome-scale...

Data from: Metabarcoding and metabolome analyses of copepod grazing reveal feeding preference and linkage to metabolite classes in dynamic microbial plankton communities

Jessica L. Ray, Julia Althammer, Katrine S. Skaar, Paolo Simonelli, Aud Larsen, Diane Stoecker, Andrey Sazhin, Umer Z. Ijaz, Christopher Quince, Jens C. Nejstgaard, Marc Frischer, Georg Pohnert & Christofer Troedsson
In order to characterize copepod feeding in relation to microbial plankton community dynamics, we combined metabarcoding and metabolome analyses during a 22-day seawater mesocosm experiment. Nutrient amendment of mesocosms promoted the development of haptophyte (Phaeocystis pouchetii)- and diatom (Skeletonema marinoi)-dominated plankton communities in mesocosms, in which Calanus sp. copepods were incubated for 24 h in flow-through chambers to allow access to prey particles (<500 μm). Copepods and mesocosm water sampled six times spanning the experiment...

Data from: Heterogeneity and concordance in locus-specific differentiation and introgression between species of towhees

Sarah E. Kingston, Thomas L. Parchman, Zachariah Gompert, C. Alex Buerkle & Michael J. Braun
The maintenance or breakdown of reproductive isolation are observable outcomes of secondary contact between species. In cases where hybrids beyond the F1 are formed, the representation of each species’ ancestry can vary dramatically among genomic regions. This genomic heterogeneity in ancestry and introgression can offer insight into evolutionary processes, particularly if introgression is compared in multiple hybrid zones. Similarly, considerable heterogeneity exists across the genome in the extent to which populations and species have diverged,...

Data from: Effects of experimental warming on biodiversity depend on ecosystem type and local species composition

Daniel S. Gruner, Matthew E. S. Bracken, Stella A. Berger, Britas Klemens Eriksson, Lars Gamfeldt, Birte Matthiessen, Stefanie Moorthi, Ulrich Sommer & Helmut Hillebrand
Climatic warming is a primary driver of change in ecosystems worldwide. Here, we synthesize responses of species richness and evenness from 187 experimental warming studies in a quantitative meta-analysis. We asked 1) whether effects of warming on diversity were detectable and consistent across terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems, 2) if effects on diversity correlated with intensity, duration, and experimental unit size of temperature change manipulations, and 3) whether these experimental effects on diversity interacted with...

Data from: Estrogen receptor alpha distribution and expression in the social neural network of monogamous and polygynous Peromyscus

Bruce S. Cushing
In microtine and dwarf hamsters low levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and medial amygdala (MeA) play a critical role in the expression of social monogamy in males, which is characterized by high levels of affiliation and low levels of aggression. In contrast, monogamous Peromyscus males display high levels of aggression and affiliative behavior with high levels of testosterone and aromatase activity. Suggesting the hypothesis that...

Data from: The adaptive potential of Populus balsamifera L. to phenology requirements in a warmer global climate

Matthew S. Olson, Nicholas Levsen, Raju Y. Soolanayakanahally, Robert D. Guy, William R. Schroeder, Stephen R. Keller & Peter Tiffin
The manner in which organisms adapt to climate change informs both a broader understanding of the evolution of biodiversity as well as plans for future conservation and mitigation. We apply common garden and association mapping approaches to quantify genetic variance and identify loci affecting bud flush and bud set, traits that define a tree’s season for height growth, in the boreal forest tree Populus balsamifera L. (balsam poplar). Using data from 478 genotypes grown in...

Data from: Correcting for missing and irregular data in home-range estimation

Christen H. Fleming, Daniel Sheldon, William F. Fagan, Peter Leimgruber, Thomas Mueller, Dejid Nandintsetseg, Michael J. Noonan, Kirk A. Olson, Edy Setyawan, Abraham Sianipar & Justin M. Calabrese
Home-range estimation is an important application of animal tracking data that is frequently complicated by autocorrelation, sampling irregularity, and small effective sample sizes. We introduce a novel, optimal weighting method that accounts for temporal sampling bias in autocorrelated tracking data. This method corrects for irregular and missing data, such that oversampled times are downweighted and undersampled times are upweighted to minimize error in the home-range estimate. We also introduce computationally efficient algorithms that make this...

Data from: Population genomics and geographical parthenogenesis in Japanese harvestmen (Opiliones, Sclerosomatidae, Leiobunum)

Mercedes Burns, Marshal Hedin & Nobuo Tsurusaki
Naturally-occurring population variation in reproductive mode presents an opportunity for researchers to test hypotheses regarding the evolution of sex. Such populations frequently assume a geographical pattern, in which parthenogenesis-dominated populations are widely dispersed, with narrowly distributed sexual populations. We evaluate the geographic distribution of genomic signatures associated with parthenogenesis using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence data from two Japanese harvestman sister taxa, Leiobunum manubriatum and L. globosum. Asexual reproduction is putatively facultative in these species,...

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