222 Works

Data from: Applying landscape genomic tools to forest management and restoration of Hawaiian koa (Acacia koa) in a changing environment

Paul F. Gugger, Christina T. Liang, Victoria L. Sork, Paul Hodgskiss & Jessica W. Wright
Identifying and quantifying the importance of environmental variables in structuring population genetic variation can help inform management decisions for conservation, restoration, or reforestation purposes, both in current and future environmental conditions. Landscape genomics offers a powerful approach for understanding the environmental factors that currently associate with genetic variation, and given those associations, where populations may be most vulnerable under future environmental change. Here, we applied genotyping by sequencing to generate over 11,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from...

Data from: The effect of demographic correlations on the stochastic population dynamics of perennial plants

Aldo Compagnoni, Andrew J. Bibian, Brad M. Ochocki, Haldre S. Rogers, Emily L. Schultz, Michelle E. Sneck, Bret D. Elderd, Amy M. Iler, David W. Inouye, Hans Jacquemyn, Tom E.X. Miller & Tom E. X. Miller
Understanding the influence of environmental variability on population dynamics is a fundamental goal of ecology. Theory suggests that, for populations in variable environments, temporal correlations between demographic vital rates (e.g., growth, survival, reproduction) can increase (if positive) or decrease (if negative) the variability of year-to-year population growth. Because this variability generally decreases long-term population viability, vital rate correlations may importantly affect population dynamics in stochastic environments. Despite long-standing theoretical interest, it is unclear whether vital...

Data from: Opening the door to the past: accessing phylogenetic, pathogen, and population data from museum curated bees

Anthony D. Vaudo, Megan L. Fritz & Margarita M. López-Uribe
Tens of thousands of insects are deposited in collections every year as a result of survey-based studies that aim to investigate ecological questions. DNA-based techniques can expand the utility of these collections to explore their demographic and evolutionary history, temporal changes in their abundance, and pathogen dynamics. Using museum collections of the non-model bee species Eucera (Peponapis) pruinosa Say 1837 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Eucerini), we developed a standard minimally-destructive and budget-friendly protocol to extract DNA and...

Data from: Estimation of effective population size in continuously distributed populations: there goes the neighborhood

Maile C. Neel, Kevin McKelvey, Robin S. Waples, Nils Ryman, Michael W. Lloyd, Ruth Short Bull, Fred W. Allendorf & Michael K. Schwartz
Use of genetic methods to estimate effective population size (N^e) is rapidly increasing, but all approaches make simplifying assumptions unlikely to be met in real populations. In particular, all assume a single, unstructured population, and none has been evaluated for use with continuously distributed species. We simulated continuous populations with local mating structure, as envisioned by Wright's concept of neighborhood size (NS), and evaluated performance of a single-sample estimator based on linkage disequilibrium (LD), which...

Data from: Ecological correlates of Himalayan musk deer Moschus leucogaster

Paras Bikram Singh, Pradip Saud, Kumar Mainali, Doug Cram, Arjun Thapa, Nar Bahadur Chhetri, Laxman P. Poudyal, Hem Sagar Baral, Zhigang Jiang & Douglas Cram
Himalayan musk deer (Moschus leucogaster; hereafter musk deer) are endangered as a result of poaching and habitat loss. The species is nocturnal, crepuscular and elusive, making direct observation of habitat use and behavior difficult. However, musk deer establish and repeatedly use the same latrines for defecation. To quantify musk deer habitat correlates, we used observational spatial data based on presence-absence of musk deer latrines, as well as a range of fine spatial-scale ecological covariates. To...

Data from: Multiresponse algorithms for community-level modeling: review of theory, applications, and comparison to species distribution models

Diego Nieto-Lugilde, Katlin C. Maguire, Jessica L. Blois, John W. Williams, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick & Kaitlin C. Maguire
1.Community-level models (CLMs) consider multiple, co-occurring species in model fitting and are lesser known alternatives to species distribution models (SDMs) for analyzing and predicting biodiversity patterns. CLMs simultaneously model multiple species, including rare species, while reducing overfitting and implicitly considering drivers of co-occurrence. Many CLMs are direct extensions of well-known SDMs and therefore should be familiar to ecologists. However, CLMs remain underutilized, and there have been few tests of their potential benefits and no systematic...

Data from: Effects of fertilizer on inorganic soil N in East Africa maize systems: vertical distributions and temporal dynamics

Katherine L. Tully, Jonathan Hickman, Madeline McKenna, Christopher Neill & Cheryl A. Palm
Fertilizer applications are poised to increase across sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the fate of added nitrogen (N) is largely unknown. We measured vertical distributions and temporal variations of soil inorganic N following fertilizer application in two maize (Zea mays L.)-growing regions of contrasting soil type. Fertilizer trials were established on a clayey soil in Yala, Kenya, and on a sandy soil in Tumbi, Tanzania, with application rates of 0–200 kg N/ha/yr. Soil profiles were collected...

Data from: Coordinated species importation policies are needed to reduce serious invasions globally: the case of alien bumblebees in South America

Marcelo A. Aizen, Cecilia Smith-Ramirez, Carolina L. Morales, Lorena Vieli, Agustín Sáez, Rodrigo M. Barahona-Segovia, Marina P. Arbetman, José Montalva, Lucas A. Garibaldi, David W. Inouye & Lawrence D. Harder
The global trade of species promotes diverse human activities but also facilitates the introduction of potentially invasive species into new environments. As species ignore national boundaries, unilateral national decisions concerning species trade set the stage for transnational species invasion with significant conservation, economic and political consequences. The need for a coordinated approach to species importation policies is demonstrated by the introduction of two bumblebee species into Chile for crop pollination, despite Argentina banning commercial importation...

Data from: A quantitative framework for investigating risk of deadly collisions between marine wildlife and boats

Julien Martin, Quentin Sabatier, Timothy A. Gowan, Christophe Giraud, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Scott Calleson, Joel G. Ortega-Ortiz, Charles J. Deutsch, Athena Rycyk & Stacie M. Koslovsky
Speed regulations of watercraft in protected areas are designed to reduce lethal collisions with wildlife but can have economic consequences. We present a quantitative framework for investigating the risk of deadly collisions between boats and wildlife. We apply encounter rate theory to demonstrate how marine mammal-boat encounter rate can be used to predict the expected number of deaths associated with management scenarios. We illustrate our approach with management scenarios for two endangered species: the Florida...

Data from: Land use history and seed dispersal drive divergent plant community assembly patterns in urban vacant lots

Anna L. Johnson, Dorothy Borowy & Christopher M. Swan
1. Despite high levels of disturbance and habitat modification, urban ecosystems still host substantial levels of biodiversity. The processes that maintain existing levels of diversity, however, remain understudied. Identifying the links between urban ecological processes and patterns has, therefore, become a fundamental research goal to support urban biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. 2. We conducted a study to determine how the diversity and composition of urban plant communities is affected by spatially and temporally variable land...

Data from: Ecological interactions and coexistence are predicted by gene expression similarity in freshwater green algae

Anita Narwani, Bastian Bentlage, Markos A. Alexandrou, Keith J. Fritschie, Charles Delwiche, Todd H. Oakley & Bradley J. Cardinale
Phenotypic variation controls the species interactions which determine whether or not species coexist. Long-standing hypotheses in ecology and evolution posit that phenotypic differentiation enables coexistence by increasing the size of niche differentiation. This hypothesis has only been tested using macroscopic traits to date, but niche differentiation, particularly of microscopic organisms, also occurs at the molecular and metabolic level. We examined how phenotypic variation that arises at the level of gene expression over evolutionary time affects...

Data from: A phylogenetic- and trait-based analysis of community assembly in a subtropical forest in central China

Jiaxin Zhang, Nathan Swenson, Jianming Liu, Mengting Liu, Xiujuan Qiao & Mingxi Jiang
Despite several decades of study in community ecology, the relative importance of the ecological processes that determine species co-occurrence across spatial scales remains uncertain. Some of this uncertainty may be reduced by studying the scale dependency of community assembly in the light of environmental variation. Phylogenetic and functional trait information are often used to provide potentially valuable insights into the drivers of community assembly. Here, we combined phylogenetic- and trait-based tests to gain insights into...

Data from: Phylogenetic conservatism in plant phenology

T. Jonathan Davies, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Nathan J. B. Kraft, Nicolas Salamin, Jenica M. Allen, Toby R. Ault, Julio L. Betancourt, Kjell Bolmgren, Elsa E. Cleland, Benjamin I. Cook, Theresa M. Crimmins, Susan J. Mazer, Gregory J. McCabe, Stephanie Pau, Jim Regetz, Mark D. Schwartz & Steven E. Travers
Phenological events – defined points in the life cycle of a plant or animal – have been regarded as highly plastic traits, reflecting flexible responses to various environmental cues. The ability of a species to track, via shifts in phenological events, the abiotic environment through time might dictate its vulnerability to future climate change. Understanding the predictors and drivers of phenological change is therefore critical. Here, we evaluated evidence for phylogenetic conservatism – the tendency...

Data from: Ecological effects on metabolic scaling amphipod responses to fish predators in freshwater springs

Douglas S. Glazier, Eric M. Butler, Sara A. Lombardi, Travis J. Deptola, Andrew J. Reese & Erin V. Satterthwaite
Metabolic rate is commonly thought to scale with body mass to the 3/4-power as a result of universal body-design constraints. However, recent comparative work has shown that the metabolic scaling slope may vary significantly among species and higher taxa, apparently in response to different lifestyles and ecological conditions, though the precise mechanisms involved are not well understood. To better understand these under-appreciated ecological effects and their causes, it is important to control for extraneous phylogenetic...

On the social and cognitive dimensions of wicked environmental problems characterized by conceptual and solution uncertainty

Felber J. Arroyave B., Oscar Yandy Romero Goyeneche, Meredith Gore, Gaston Heimeriks, Jeffrey Jenkins & Alexander M. Petersen
We develop a quantitative framework for understanding the class of wicked problems that emerge at the intersections of “natural”, social, and technological complex systems. Wicked problems reflect our incomplete understanding of interdependent global systems and the systemic risk they pose; such problems escape solutions because they are often ill-defined, and thus misidentified and under-appreciated by communities of problem-solvers. While there are well-documented benefits to tackling boundary-crossing problems from various viewpoints, the integration of diverse approaches...

Differential effects of nematode infection on pollinating and non-pollinating fig wasps: can shared antagonism provide net benefits to a mutualism?

Justin Van Goor, Finn Piatscheck, Derek Houston & John Nason
1. Species pairs that form mutualistic associations are also components of broader organismal community networks. These network-level associations have shaped the evolution of individual mutualisms through interspecific interactions ranging from secondarily mutualistic to intensely antagonistic. Our understanding of this complex context remains limited because characterizing the impacts of species interacting with focal mutualists is often difficult. How is the fitness of mutualists impacted by the co-occurring interactive network of community associates? 2. We investigate this...

“Step up and Do It”: Fraternity and Sorority Members’ Beliefs About Citizenship

Amie Jackson & Susan V. Iverson

Differences in Self-Awareness Related Measures Among Culturally Based Fraternity, Social Fraternity, and Non-Affiliated College Men

Tricia R. Shalka & Susan Robb Jones

DataCite Metadata Schema Documentation for the Publication and Citation of Research Data and Other Research Outputs v4.4

1 Introduction 1.1 The DataCite Consortium 1.2 DataCite Community Participation 1.3 The Metadata Schema 1.4 Version 4.4 Update 2 DataCite Metadata Properties 2.1 Overview 2.2 Citation 2.3 DataCite Properties 3 XML Example 4 XML Schema 5 Other DataCite Services Appendices Appendix 1: Controlled List Definitions Appendix 2: Earlier Version Update Notes Appendix 3: Standard values for unknown information Appendix 4: Version 4.1 Changes in support of software citation Appendix 5: FORCE11 Software Citation Principles Mapping

DataCite to Dublin Core Mapping v4.4.

On the occasion of the release of v4.4 of the DataCite Metadata Schema its Metadata Working Group has updated the mapping to Dublin Core. This replaces the mapping in the Appendix of the DataCite-MetadataKernel v2.1. The mapping can be used to convert records described following version 4.4 of the DataCite Metadata Schema into records that comply with the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative Schema.

Data from: Phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution contribute to advancing flowering phenology in response to climate change

Jill T. Anderson, David W. Inouye, Amy M. McKinney, Robert I. Colautti & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Anthropogenic climate change has already altered the timing of major life history transitions, such as the initiation of reproduction. Both phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution can underlie rapid phenological shifts in response to climate change but their relative contributions are poorly understood. Here, we combine a continuous 38-year field survey with quantitative genetic field experiments to assess adaptation in the context of climate change. We focused on Boechera stricta (Brassicaeae), a mustard native to the...

Data from: Vegetation structure mediates a shift in predator avoidance behavior in a range-edge population

Cora A. Johnston & Rachel S. Smith
Where organisms encounter novel conditions during range expansion, behavioral changes suited to the new habitat can enhance survival. Behavioral changes that mitigate predation risk are particularly important for the persistence of range-edge populations, especially where plastic responses outpace genetic adaptation. We use a climate-driven spatial mismatch between the arboreal mangrove tree crab (Aratus pisonii) and its primary mangrove habitat to evaluate differences in predator avoidance behavior between populations in range-center mangroves and adjacent range-edge salt...

Data from: The effect of repeated, lethal sampling on wild bee abundance and diversity

Zachariah J. Gezon, Eli S. Wyman, John S. Ascher, David W. Inouye & Rebecca E. Irwin
1. Bee pollinators provide a critical ecosystem service to wild and agricultural plants but are reported to be declining world-wide due to anthropogenic change. Long-term data on bee abundance and diversity are scarce, and the need for additional quantitative sampling using repeatable methods has been emphasized. Recently, monitoring programmes have begun using a standardized method that employs a combination of pan traps and sweep netting, resulting in lethal sampling of bees. This standardized method can...

Data from: Lack of genetic isolation by distance, similar genetic structuring but different demographic histories in a fig-pollinating wasp mutualism

Enwei Tian, John D. Nason, Linna Zheng, Hui Yu, Finn Kjellberg & Carlos A. Machado
Historical abiotic factors such as climatic oscillations and extreme climatic events as well as biotic factors have shaped the structuring of species’ genetic diversity. In obligate species-specific mutualisms, the biogeographic histories of the interacting species are tightly linked. This could be particularly true for nuclear genes in the Ficus-pollinating wasp mutualistic association as the insects disperse pollen from their natal tree. In this study we compare spatial genetic structure of plant and pollinator for the...

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