191 Works

Data from: The influence of balanced and imbalanced resource supply on biodiversity-functioning relationship across ecosystems

Aleksandra M. Lewandowska, Antje Biermann, Elizabeth T. Borer, Miguel A. Cebrian-Piqueras, Steven A. J. Declerck, Luc De Meester, Ellen Van Donk, Lars Gamfeldt, Daniel S. Gruner, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Kevin P. Kirkman, Christopher A. Klausmeier, Michael Kleyer, Johannes M. H. Knops, Pieter Lemmens, Eric M. Lind, Elena Litchman, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Koen Martens, Sandra Meier, Vanessa Minden, Joslin L. Moore, Harry Olde Venterink, Eric W. Seabloom … & Helmut Hillebrand
Numerous studies show that increasing species richness leads to higher ecosystem productivity. This effect is often attributed to more efficient portioning of multiple resources in communities with higher numbers of competing species, indicating the role of resource supply and stoichiometry for biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships. Here, we merged theory on ecological stoichiometry with a framework of biodiversity–ecosystem functioning to understand how resource use transfers into primary production. We applied a structural equation model to define patterns...

Data from: Effects of fertilizer on inorganic soil N in East Africa maize systems: vertical distributions and temporal dynamics

Katherine L. Tully, Jonathan Hickman, Madeline McKenna, Christopher Neill & Cheryl A. Palm
Fertilizer applications are poised to increase across sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but the fate of added nitrogen (N) is largely unknown. We measured vertical distributions and temporal variations of soil inorganic N following fertilizer application in two maize (Zea mays L.)-growing regions of contrasting soil type. Fertilizer trials were established on a clayey soil in Yala, Kenya, and on a sandy soil in Tumbi, Tanzania, with application rates of 0–200 kg N/ha/yr. Soil profiles were collected...

Data from: A rotational cylindrical fMRI phantom for image quality control

Sunder S. Rajan & Wang Zhan
Purpose: A novel phantom for image quality testing for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans is described. Methods: The cylindrical, rotatable, ~4.5L phantom, with eight wedge-shaped compartments, is used to simulate rest and activated states. The compartments contain NiCl2 doped agar gel with alternating concentrations of agar (1.4%, 1.6%) to produce T1 and T2 values approximating brain grey matter. The Jacard index was used to compare the image distortions for echo planar imaging (EPI) and...

Data from: The role of transcriptomes linked with responses to light environment on seedling mortality in a subtropical forest, China

Baocai Han, Maria Natalia Umana, Xiangcheng Mi, Xiaojuan Liu, Lei Chen, Yunquan Wang, Yu Liang, Wei Wei & Keping Ma
Differences in seedling survival in trees have a lasting imprint on seedling, juvenile and adult community structure. Identifying the drivers of these differences, therefore, is a critical research objective that ultimately requires knowledge regarding how organismal function interacts with the local environment to influence survival rates. In tree communities, differences in light use strategies are frequently invoked to explain differences in seedling demographic performance through growth and survival trade-offs. For example, shade-tolerant species grow slowly...

Data from: The opsin genes of Amazonian cichlids

Daniel Escobar-Camacho, Erica Ramos, Cesar Martins & Karen L. Carleton
Vision is a critical sense for organismal survival with visual sensitivities strongly shaped by the environment. Some freshwater fishes with a Gondwanan origin are distributed in both South American rivers including the Amazon, as well as African rivers and lakes. These different habitats likely required adaptations to murky and clear environments. In this study, we compare the molecular basis of Amazonian and African cichlid fishes’ visual systems. We used next generation sequencing of genomes and...

Data from: Integrating encounter theory with decision analysis to evaluate collision risk and determine optimal protection zones for wildlife

Bradley J. Udell, Julien Martin, , Mathieu Bonneau, Holly Edwards, Timothy A. Gowan, Stacie K. Hardy, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Calleson, Charles J. Deutsch, Robert J. Fletcher & Charles S. Calleson
1. Better understanding human-wildlife interactions and their links with management can help improve the design of wildlife protection zones. One important example is the problem of wildlife collisions with vehicles or human-built structures (e.g. power lines, wind farms). In fact, collisions between marine wildlife and watercraft are among the major threats faced by several endangered species of marine mammals. Natural resource managers are therefore interested in finding cost-effective solutions to mitigate these threats. 2. We...

Data from: The pursuit strategy of predatory bluefish

Matthew McHenry, Jacob Johansen, Alberto Soto, Brian Free, Derek Paley & James Liao
A predator's ability to capture prey depends critically on how it coordinates its approach in response to a prey's motion. Flying insects, bats, and raptors are capable of capturing prey with a strategy known as parallel navigation, which allows a predator to move directly toward the anticipated point of interception. It is unclear if predators using other modes of locomotion are capable of employing this strategy when pursuing evasive prey. Using kinematic measurements and mathematical...

Data from: Applying landscape genomic tools to forest management and restoration of Hawaiian koa (Acacia koa) in a changing environment

Paul F. Gugger, Christina T. Liang, Victoria L. Sork, Paul Hodgskiss & Jessica W. Wright
Identifying and quantifying the importance of environmental variables in structuring population genetic variation can help inform management decisions for conservation, restoration, or reforestation purposes, both in current and future environmental conditions. Landscape genomics offers a powerful approach for understanding the environmental factors that currently associate with genetic variation, and given those associations, where populations may be most vulnerable under future environmental change. Here, we applied genotyping by sequencing to generate over 11,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms from...

Data from: Multiresponse algorithms for community-level modeling: review of theory, applications, and comparison to species distribution models

Diego Nieto-Lugilde, Katlin C. Maguire, Jessica L. Blois, John W. Williams, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick & Kaitlin C. Maguire
1.Community-level models (CLMs) consider multiple, co-occurring species in model fitting and are lesser known alternatives to species distribution models (SDMs) for analyzing and predicting biodiversity patterns. CLMs simultaneously model multiple species, including rare species, while reducing overfitting and implicitly considering drivers of co-occurrence. Many CLMs are direct extensions of well-known SDMs and therefore should be familiar to ecologists. However, CLMs remain underutilized, and there have been few tests of their potential benefits and no systematic...

Data from: Non-equilibrium dynamics and floral trait interactions shape extant angiosperm diversity

Brian C. O'Meara, Stacey D. Smith, W. Scott Armbruster, Lawrence D. Harder, Christopher R. Hardy, Lena C. Hileman, Larry Hufford, Amy Litt, Susana Magallon, Stephen A. Smith, Peter F. Stevens, Charles B. Fenster & Pamela K. Diggle
Why are some traits and trait combinations exceptionally common across the tree of life, whereas others are vanishingly rare? The distribution of trait diversity across a clade at any time depends on the ancestral state of the clade, the rate at which new phenotypes evolve, the differences in speciation and extinction rates across lineages, and whether an equilibrium has been reached. Here we examine the role of transition rates, differential diversification (speciation minus extinction), and...

Data from: Host-adapted aphid populations differ in their migratory patterns and capacity to colonize crops

Sanford D. Eigenbrode, Thomas S. Davis, Jennifer R. Adams, Lisette P. Waits, David Hawthorne & Damon S. Husebye
Although phytophagous insects can vary genetically in host use and exhibit long-range movements, the combined implications of these phenomena for pest management have received limited attention. To address this, we surveyed the genetic diversity of pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum using twelve microsatellite loci and assessed host association patterns and annual movement from a putative source region (Columbia River Basin) to the Palouse region of northern Idaho and western Washington, where the aphid is a pest...

Data from: Movements of four native Hawaiian birds across a naturally fragmented landscape

Jessie L. Knowlton, David J. Flaspohler, Eben H. Paxton, Tadashi Fukami, Christian P. Giardina, Daniel S. Gruner & Erin E. Wilson Rankin
Animals often increase their fitness by moving across space in response to temporal variation in habitat quality and resource availability, and as a result of intra and inter-specific interactions. The long-term persistence of populations and even whole species depends on the collective patterns of individual movements, yet animal movements have been poorly studied at the landscape level. We quantified movement behavior within four native species of Hawaiian forest birds in a complex lava-fragmented landscape: Hawai‛i...

Differential effects of nematode infection on pollinating and non-pollinating fig wasps: can shared antagonism provide net benefits to a mutualism?

Justin Van Goor, Finn Piatscheck, Derek Houston & John Nason
1. Species pairs that form mutualistic associations are also components of broader organismal community networks. These network-level associations have shaped the evolution of individual mutualisms through interspecific interactions ranging from secondarily mutualistic to intensely antagonistic. Our understanding of this complex context remains limited because characterizing the impacts of species interacting with focal mutualists is often difficult. How is the fitness of mutualists impacted by the co-occurring interactive network of community associates? 2. We investigate this...

DataCite Metadata Schema Documentation for the Publication and Citation of Research Data and Other Research Outputs v4.4

1 Introduction 1.1 The DataCite Consortium 1.2 DataCite Community Participation 1.3 The Metadata Schema 1.4 Version 4.4 Update 2 DataCite Metadata Properties 2.1 Overview 2.2 Citation 2.3 DataCite Properties 3 XML Example 4 XML Schema 5 Other DataCite Services Appendices Appendix 1: Controlled List Definitions Appendix 2: Earlier Version Update Notes Appendix 3: Standard values for unknown information Appendix 4: Version 4.1 Changes in support of software citation Appendix 5: FORCE11 Software Citation Principles Mapping

Data from: A phylogenetic- and trait-based analysis of community assembly in a subtropical forest in central China

Jiaxin Zhang, Nathan Swenson, Jianming Liu, Mengting Liu, Xiujuan Qiao & Mingxi Jiang
Despite several decades of study in community ecology, the relative importance of the ecological processes that determine species co-occurrence across spatial scales remains uncertain. Some of this uncertainty may be reduced by studying the scale dependency of community assembly in the light of environmental variation. Phylogenetic and functional trait information are often used to provide potentially valuable insights into the drivers of community assembly. Here, we combined phylogenetic- and trait-based tests to gain insights into...

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