13 Works

Data from: Phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution contribute to advancing flowering phenology in response to climate change

Jill T. Anderson, David W. Inouye, Amy M. McKinney, Robert I. Colautti, Thomas Mitchell-Olds, J. T. Anderson, R. I. Colautti, T. Mitchell-Olds, D. W. Inouye & A. M. McKinney
Anthropogenic climate change has already altered the timing of major life history transitions, such as the initiation of reproduction. Both phenotypic plasticity and adaptive evolution can underlie rapid phenological shifts in response to climate change but their relative contributions are poorly understood. Here, we combine a continuous 38-year field survey with quantitative genetic field experiments to assess adaptation in the context of climate change. We focused on Boechera stricta (Brassicaeae), a mustard native to the...

Data from: Bayesian inference of a complex invasion history revealed by nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity in the colonizing plant, Silene latifolia

Stephen R. Keller, Kimberly J. Gilbert, Peter D. Fields & Douglas R. Taylor
Species invading new ranges are subject to a series of demographic events that can strongly shape genetic diversity. Describing this demographic history is important for understanding where invasive species come from and how they spread, and is critical to testing hypotheses of post-invasion adaptation. Here, we analyze nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity to study the invasion history of the widespread colonizing weed, Silene latifolia (Caryophyllaceae). Bayesian clustering and PCA revealed strong population structure in the...

Data from: Food sharing in vampire bats: reciprocal help predicts donations more than relatedness or harassment

Gerald G. Carter, Gerald S. Wilkinson, G. G. Carter & G. S. Wilkinson
Common vampire bats often regurgitate food to roost-mates that fail to feed. The original explanation for this costly helping behaviour invoked both direct and indirect fitness benefits. Several authors have since suggested that food sharing is maintained solely by indirect fitness because non-kin food sharing could have resulted from kin recognition errors, indiscriminate altruism within groups, or harassment. To test these alternatives, we examined predictors of food-sharing decisions under controlled conditions of mixed relatedness and...

Data from: Parental genetic effects in a cavefish adaptive behavior explain disparity between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

Masato Yoshizawa, Go Ashida & William R. Jeffery
Epigenetic parental genetic effects are important in many biological processes but their roles in the evolution of adaptive traits and their consequences in naturally evolving populations remain to be addressed. By comparing two divergent blind cave-dwelling cavefish populations with a sighted surface-dwelling population (surface fish) of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, we report here that convergences in vibration attraction behavior (VAB), the lateral line sensory receptors underlying this behavior, and the feeding benefits of this behavior...

Data from: Fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana mutation accumulation lines whose spontaneous mutations are known

Charles B. Fenster, Matthew Thomas Rutter, Angela J. Roles, Jeffrey K. Conner, Ruth G. Shaw, Frank Holcomb Shaw, Korbinian Schneeberger, Stephan Ossowski & Detlef Weigel
Despite the fundamental importance of mutation to the evolutionary process, we have little knowledge of the direct consequences of specific spontaneous mutations to the fitness of the organism. Combining results of whole-genome sequencing with repeated field assays of survival and reproduction, we quantify the combined effects on fitness of spontaneous mutations identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the effects are beneficial, deleterious or neutral depending on the environmental context. Some lines, bearing mutations disrupting...

Data from: Localizing FST outliers on a QTL map reveals evidence for large genomic regions of reduced gene exchange during speciation-with-gene-flow

Sara Via, Gina Conte, Casey Mason-Foley & Kelly Mills
Populations that maintain phenotypic divergence in sympatry typically show a mosaic pattern of genomic divergence, requiring a corresponding mosaic of genomic isolation (reduced gene flow). However, mechanisms that could produce the genomic isolation required for divergence-with-gene-flow have barely been explored, apart from the traditional localized effects of selection and reduced recombination near centromeres or inversions. By localizing FST outliers from a genome scan of wild pea aphid host races on a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL)...

Data from: Influence of natural and novel organic carbon sources on denitrification in forest, degraded urban, and restored streams

Tamara A. Newcomer, Sujay S. Kaushal, Paul M. Mayer, Amy R. Shields, Elizabeth A. Canuel, Peter M. Groffman & Arthur J. Gold
Organic carbon is important in regulating ecosystem function, and its source and abundance may be altered by urbanization. We investigated shifts in organic carbon quantity and quality associated with urbanization and ecosystem restoration, and its potential effects on denitrification at the riparian–stream interface. Field measurements of streamwater chemistry, organic carbon characterization, and laboratory-based denitrification experiments were completed at two forested, two restored, and two unrestored urban streams at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research site, Maryland,...

Data from: Multigene phylogenetic analyses of the Thelonectria coronata and T. veuillotiana species complexes

Gary J. Samuels, Catalina Salgado-Salazar, Amy Y. Rossman, Mariana Capdet & Priscila Chaverri
Thelonectria is a recently established genus of common and ubiquitous fungi on woody hosts, previously placed in the genus Neonectria. Thelonectria coronata and T. veuillotiana occur sympatrically in several geographical areas in tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions. Previous taxonomic studies including T. coronata and T. veuillotiana suggested these fungi could represent species complexes; however, the morphological features used to define species exhibited few differences useful for testing this hypothesis. In order to assess the status...

Data from: Interspecific genetics of speciation phenotypes: song and preference coevolution in Hawaiian crickets

Kevin P. Oh, Daniel J. Fergus, Jaime L. Grace & Kerry L. Shaw
Understanding the genetic architecture of traits involved in premating isolation between recently diverged lineages can provide valuable insight regarding the mode and tempo of speciation. The repeated coevolution of male courtship song and female preference across the species radiation of Laupala crickets presents an unusual opportunity to compare the genetic basis of divergence across independent evolutionary histories. Previous studies of one pair of species revealed a polygenic basis (including a significant X chromosome contribution) to...

Data from: The adaptive potential of Populus balsamifera L. to phenology requirements in a warmer global climate

Matthew S. Olson, Nicholas Levsen, Raju Y. Soolanayakanahally, Robert D. Guy, William R. Schroeder, Stephen R. Keller & Peter Tiffin
The manner in which organisms adapt to climate change informs both a broader understanding of the evolution of biodiversity as well as plans for future conservation and mitigation. We apply common garden and association mapping approaches to quantify genetic variance and identify loci affecting bud flush and bud set, traits that define a tree’s season for height growth, in the boreal forest tree Populus balsamifera L. (balsam poplar). Using data from 478 genotypes grown in...

Data from: Phylogenetic conservatism in plant phenology

T. Jonathan Davies, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Nathan J. B. Kraft, Nicolas Salamin, Jenica M. Allen, Toby R. Ault, Julio L. Betancourt, Kjell Bolmgren, Elsa E. Cleland, Benjamin I. Cook, Theresa M. Crimmins, Susan J. Mazer, Gregory J. McCabe, Stephanie Pau, Jim Regetz, Mark D. Schwartz & Steven E. Travers
Phenological events – defined points in the life cycle of a plant or animal – have been regarded as highly plastic traits, reflecting flexible responses to various environmental cues. The ability of a species to track, via shifts in phenological events, the abiotic environment through time might dictate its vulnerability to future climate change. Understanding the predictors and drivers of phenological change is therefore critical. Here, we evaluated evidence for phylogenetic conservatism – the tendency...

Data from: Nutrient presses and pulses differentially impact plants, herbivores, detritivores and their natural enemies

Shannon M. Murphy, Gina M. Wimp, Danny Lewis & Robert F. Denno
Anthropogenic nutrient inputs into native ecosystems cause fluctuations in resources that normally limit plant growth, which has important consequences for associated food webs. Such inputs from agricultural and urban habitats into nearby natural systems are increasing globally and can be highly variable, spanning the range from sporadic to continuous. Despite the global increase in anthropogenically-derived nutrient inputs into native ecosystems, the consequences of variation in subsidy duration on native plants and their associated food webs...

Data from: Effects of exposure to pile driving sounds on the lake sturgeon, Nile tilapia, and hogchoker

Michele B. Halvorsen, Brandon M. Casper, Frazer Matthews, Thomas J. Carlson, Arthur N. Popper, B. M. Casper, F. Matthews & A. N. Popper
Pile driving and other impulsive sound sources have the potential to injure or kill fishes. One mechanism that produces injuries is the rapid motion of the walls of the swim bladder as it repeatedly contacts nearby tissues. To further understand the involvement of the swim bladder in tissue damage a specially-designed wave tube was used to expose three species to pile driving sounds. Species included lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvecens) with an open (physoclistous) swim bladder,...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • University of Maryland, College Park
    13
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • CIUDAD
    1
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • VA Office of Research and Development
    1
  • Lund University
    1
  • University of Rhode Island
    1