13 Works

Data from: A novel mechanism for grazing lawn formation: large herbivore-induced modification of the plant-soil water balance

Michiel P. Veldhuis, Ruth A. Howison, Rienk W. Fokkema, Elske Tielens & Han Olff
1. Large herbivores play a key-role in creating spatial heterogeneity through the formation of grazing lawns. Recent research suggests that the currently accepted nutrient-based theory on the formation of these grazing lawns cannot universally explain their formation in all ecosystems where they are found. 2. We developed and investigated an alternative hypothesis on grazing lawn formation and maintenance based on herbivore effects on the plant-soil water balance. We propose that large herbivores change the soil...

Data from: \"Complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes for the jack species Caranx ignobilis (Forsskål, 1775) and C. melampygus (Cuvier, 1833) (Perciformes:Carangidae) from the High Hawaiian Islands\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 October 2013 – 30 November 2013

Scott R. Santos
Complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes for the jack species Caranx ignobilis (Forsskål, 1775) and C. melampygus (Cuvier, 1833) (Perciformes:Carangidae) from the High Hawaiian Islands are presented along with annotation and characterization of intragenomic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) and indel variation.

Data from: \"Genome-wide microsatellite marker development from next-generation sequencing of two non-model bat species impacted by wind turbine mortality: Lasiurus borealis and L. cinereus (Vespertilionidae)\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 October 2013 to 30 November 2013

Stephen R. Keller, Regina Trott, Cortney Pylant, David N. Nelson & Scott R. Santos
Tree-roosting bats in the genus Lasiurus are widespread, migratory species that have not been well characterized for population genetic diversity and structure due to a lack of genetic resources. Generating genetic resources in Lasiurus is made pressing by the need for conservation genetic assessments of demographic trends in this genus, which comprise a large percentage of bat mortalities at wind turbine sites across North America. We report on marker development from whole-genome Illumina sequencing of...

Data from: Target enrichment of ultraconserved elements from arthropods provides a genomic perspective on relationships among Hymenoptera

Brant C. Faircloth, Michael G. Branstetter, Noor D. White & Séan G. Brady
Gaining a genomic perspective on phylogeny requires the collection of data from many putatively independent loci across the genome. Among insects, an increasingly common approach to collecting this class of data involves transcriptome sequencing, because few insects have high-quality genome sequences available; assembling new genomes remains a limiting factor; the transcribed portion of the genome is a reasonable, reduced subset of the genome to target; and the data collected from transcribed portions of the genome...

Data from: Differentiating the evolution of female song and male-female duets in the New World blackbirds: can tropical natural history traits explain duet evolution?

Karan J. Odom, Kevin E. Omland & J. Jordan Price
Female bird song and combined vocal duets of mated pairs are both frequently associated with tropical, monogamous, sedentary natural histories. Little is known, however, about what selects for duetting behavior versus female song. Female song likely preceded duet evolution and could drive apparent relationships between duets and these natural histories. We compared the evolution of female song and male-female duets in the New World blackbirds (Icteridae) by investigating patterns of gains and losses of both...

Data from: The incidence and pattern of co-pollinator diversification in dioecious and monoecious figs

Li Yuan Yang, Carlos A. Machado, Xiao-Dong Dang, Yan-Qiong Peng, Da-Rong Yang, Wan-Jin Liao, Da-Yong Zhang & Li-Yuan Yang
Differences in breeding system are associated with correlated ecological and morphological changes in plants. In Ficus, dioecy and monoecy are strongly associated with different suites of traits (tree height, population density, fruiting frequency, pollinator dispersal ecology). Although ~30% of fig species are pollinated by multiple species of fig-pollinating wasps it has been suggested that co-pollinators are rare in dioecious figs. Here we test whether there is a connection between fig breeding system and co-pollinator incidence...

Data from: A gateway for phylogenetic analysis powered by grid computing featuring GARLI 2.0

Adam L. Bazinet, Derrick J. Zwickl & Michael P. Cummings
We introduce molecularevolution.org, a publicly available gateway for high-throughput, maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis powered by grid computing. The gateway features a garli 2.0 web service that enables a user to quickly and easily submit thousands of maximum likelihood tree searches or bootstrap searches that are executed in parallel on distributed computing resources. The garli web service allows one to easily specify partitioned substitution models using a graphical interface, and it performs sophisticated post-processing of phylogenetic...

Data from: How topography induces reproductive asynchrony and alters gypsy moth invasion dynamics

Jonathan A. Walter, Marcia S. Meixler, Thomas Mueller, William F. Fagan, Patrick C. Tobin & Kyle J. Haynes
1. Reproductive asynchrony, a temporal mismatch in reproductive maturation between an individual and potential mates, may contribute to mate-finding failure and Allee effects that influence the establishment and spread of invasive species. Variation in elevation is likely to promote variability in maturation times for species with temperature-dependent development, but it is not known how strongly this influences reproductive asynchrony or the population growth of invasive species. 2. We examined whether spatial variation in reproductive asynchrony,...

Data from: Ecological genomics meets community-level modeling of biodiversity: mapping the genomic landscape of current and future environmental adaptation

Matthew C. Fitzpatrick & Stephen R. Keller
Local adaptation is a central feature of most species occupying spatially heterogeneous environments, and may factor critically in responses to environmental change. However, most efforts to model the response of species to climate change ignore intraspecific variation due to local adaptation. Here, we present a new perspective on spatial modelling of organism–environment relationships that combines genomic data and community-level modelling to develop scenarios regarding the geographic distribution of genomic variation in response to environmental change....

Data from: Recent admixture generates heterozygosity-fitness correlations during the range expansion of an invading species

Stephen R. Keller, Peter D. Fields, Andrea E. Berardi & Doug R. Taylor
Admixture, the mixing of historically isolated gene pools, can have immediate consequences for the genetic architecture of fitness traits. Admixture may be especially important for newly colonized populations, such as during range expansion and species invasions, by generating heterozygosity that can boost fitness through heterosis. Despite widespread evidence for admixture during species invasions, few studies have examined the demographic history leading to admixture, how admixture affects the heterozygosity and fitness of invasive genotypes, and whether...

Data from: Restoration as mitigation: analysis of stream mitigation for coal mining impacts in southern Appalachia

Margaret A. Palmer & Kelly Lynn Hondula
Compensatory mitigation is commonly used to replace aquatic natural resources being lost or degraded but little is known about the success of stream mitigation. This article presents a synthesis of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from annual monitoring reports indicate that the ratio of lengths of stream impacted to lengths of stream mitigation projects were < 1 for many projects, and most mitigation was implemented...

Data from: Evolutionary relatedness does not predict competition and co-occurrence in natural or experimental communities of green algae

Markos A. Alexandrou, John D. Hall, Charles F. Delwiche, Bradley J. Cardinale, Keith Fritschie, Bastian Bentlage, Anita Narwani, Patrick A. Venail, M. Sabrina Pankey & Todd H. Oakley
The competition-relatedness hypothesis (CRH) predicts that the strength of competition is the strongest among closely related species and decreases as species become less related. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that common ancestry causes close relatives to share biological traits that lead to greater ecological similarity. Although intuitively appealing, the extent to which phylogeny can predict competition and co-occurrence among species has only recently been rigorously tested, with mixed results. When studies have failed...

Data from: Haldane's rule is linked to extraordinary sex ratios and sperm length in stalk-eyed flies.

Gerald S. Wilkinson, Sarah J. Christianson, Cara L. Brand, George Ru & Wyatt Shell
We use three allopatric populations of the stalk-eyed fly Teleopsis dalmanni from Southeast Asia to test two predictions made by the sex chromosome drive hypothesis for Haldane's rule. The first is that modifiers that suppress or enhance drive should evolve rapidly and independently in isolated populations. The second is that drive loci or modifiers should also cause sterility in hybrid males. We tested these predictions by assaying the fertility of 2,066 males derived from backcross...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • University of Maryland, College Park
    13
  • University of Virginia
    2
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    1
  • Smithsonian Institution
    1
  • St. Mary's College of Maryland
    1
  • Beijing Normal University
    1