30 Works

Data from: Fine-scale temporal analysis of genotype-dependent mortality at settlement in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

Louis V. Plough
Settlement and metamorphosis mark a critical transition in the life cycle of marine invertebrates, during which substantial mortality occurs in both field and laboratory settings. Previous pair-crossing experiments with the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas have revealed significant selective or genotype-dependent mortality around the metamorphic transition, but the fine-scale nature and timing of this mortality is not known, particularly whether it occurs before, during or after metamorphosis. In this laboratory study, microsatellite marker segregation ratios were...

Data from: Correcting for missing and irregular data in home-range estimation

Christen H. Fleming, Daniel Sheldon, William F. Fagan, Peter Leimgruber, Thomas Mueller, Dejid Nandintsetseg, Michael J. Noonan, Kirk A. Olson, Edy Setyawan, Abraham Sianipar & Justin M. Calabrese
Home-range estimation is an important application of animal tracking data that is frequently complicated by autocorrelation, sampling irregularity, and small effective sample sizes. We introduce a novel, optimal weighting method that accounts for temporal sampling bias in autocorrelated tracking data. This method corrects for irregular and missing data, such that oversampled times are downweighted and undersampled times are upweighted to minimize error in the home-range estimate. We also introduce computationally efficient algorithms that make this...

Data from: Individual-level trait variation and negative density dependence affects growth in tropical tree seedlings

Maria Natalia Umana, Elise F. Zipkin, Caicai Zhang, Min Cao, Luxiang Lin & Nathan G. Swenson
1. Individual-level interactions with neighbours and their surrounding environments are key factors influencing performance that ultimately shape and maintain diversity in tropical plant communities. Theory predicts that the strength of these interactions depends on the similarity among neighbours, the turnover in composition caused by individuals that enter as new recruits and individuals that die, and fitting to local conditions. Despite considerable phenotypic variation among individuals and high community dynamics, these three factors have rarely been...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Comparative morphology and evolution of the cnidosac in Cladobranchia (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia: Nudibranchia)

Jessica A. Goodheart, Sabrina Bleidißel, Dorothee Schillo, Ellen E. Strong, Daniel L. Ayres, Angelika Preisfeld, Allen G. Collins, Michael P. Cummings & Heike Wägele
Background: A number of shelled and shell-less gastropods are known to use multiple defensive mechanisms, including internally generated or externally obtained biochemically active compounds and structures. Within Nudipleura, nudibranchs within Cladobranchia possess such a special defense: the ability to sequester cnidarian nematocysts – small capsules that can inject venom into the tissues of other organisms. This ability is distributed across roughly 600 species within Cladobranchia, and many questions still remain in regard to the comparative...

Law, Liability, and Grey Literature: Resolving Issues of Law and Compliance

Daniel Mack
Grey literature faces a number of unique challenges when facing issues of liability and compliance with local, national, and international law. Conference and symposium proceedings, white papers, reports, newsletters, and other forms of grey literature often do not have the same legal support as journals, monographs, and other, more formal publications. This can create problems of compliance and liability. Grey publications often include works authored, edited, translated, compiled, or otherwise modified by many people affiliated...

Data from: Limited pollen dispersal, small genetic neighborhoods, and biparental inbreeding in Vallisneria americana Michx. (Hydrocharitaceae)

Michael Warren Lloyd, Hayley R. Tumas & Maile C. Neel
Premise of the study: Pollen dispersal is a key process that influences ecological and evolutionary dynamics of plant populations by facilitating sexual reproduction and gene flow. Habitat loss and fragmentation have the potential to reduce pollen dispersal within and among habitat patches. We assessed aquatic pollen dispersal and mating system characteristics in Vallisneria americana -- a water-pollinated plant with a distribution that has been reduced from historic levels. Methods: We examined pollen neighborhood size, biparental...

Data from: Cherry-picking by trialists and meta-analysts can drive conclusions about intervention efficacy

Evan Mayo-Wilson, Tianjing Li, Nicole Fusco, Lorenzo Bertizzolo, Joseph K. Canner, Terrie Cowley, Peter Doshi, Jeffrey Ehmsen, Gillian Gresham, Nan Guo, Jennifer A. Haythornthwaite, James Heyward, Hwanhee Hong, Diana Pham, Jennifer L. Payne, Lori Rosman, Elizabeth A. Stuart, Catalina Suarez-Cuervo, Elizabeth Tolbert, Claire Twose, Swaroop Vedula & Kay Dickersin
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN SUBSEQUENT PUBLICATIONS. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinepi.2017.05.007 FOR MORE INFORMATION. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine whether disagreements among multiple data sources affect systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Study Design and Setting Eligible RCTs examined gabapentin for neuropathic pain and quetiapine for bipolar depression, reported in public (e.g., journal articles) and nonpublic sources (clinical study reports [CSRs] and individual participant data [IPD]). Results...

Data from: A comprehensive analysis of autocorrelation and bias in home range estimation

Michael J. Noonan, Marlee A. Tucker, Christen H. Fleming, Tom S. Akre, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Jeanne Altmann, Pamela C. Antunes, Jerrold L. Belant, Dean Beyer, Niels Blaum, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, , Rogerio De Paula Cunha, Jasja Dekker, Jonathan Drescher-Lehman, Nina Farwig, Claudia Fichtel, Christina Fischer, Adam T. Ford, Jacob R. Goheen, René Janssen, Florian Jeltsch, Matthew Kauffman, Peter M. Kappeler … & Justin M. Calabrese
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently, the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autocorrelated tracking data remains open. This question is particularly relevant given that most estimators assume independently sampled data. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of...

Data from: Dolphins simplify their vocal calls in response to increased ambient noise

Leila Fouda, Jessica E. Wingfield, Amber D. Fandel, Aran Garrod, Kristin B. Hodge, Aaron N. Rice & Helen Bailey
Ocean noise varies spatially and temporally and is driven by natural and anthropogenic processes. Increased ambient noise levels can cause signal masking and communication impairment, affecting fitness and recruitment success. However, the effects of increasing ambient noise levels on marine species, such as marine mammals that primarily rely on sound for communication, are not well understood. We investigated the effects of concurrent ambient noise levels on social whistle calls produced by bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)...

Data from: Environmental DNA analysis of river herring in Chesapeake Bay: a powerful tool for monitoring threatened keystone species

Louis V. Plough, Matthew B. Ogburn, Gabriella A. Marafino, Kimberly D. Richie, Catherine L. Fitzgerald & Rose Geranio
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling has emerged as a powerful tool to detect and quantify species abundance in aquatic environments. However, relatively few studies have compared the performance of eDNA-based abundance estimates to traditional catch or survey approaches in the field. Here, we have developed and field-tested a qPCR assay to detect eDNA from alewife and blueback herring (collectively known as ‘river herring’), comparing eDNA-based presence and abundance data to traditional methods of quantification (ichthyoplankton sampling...

Data from: Landscape genomics provides evidence of climate-associated genetic variation in Mexican populations of Quercus rugosa Nee

Karina Martins, Paul Gugger, Jesus Llanderal-Mendoza, Antonio González-Rodríguez, Sorel T. Fitz-Gibbon, Jian-Li Zhao, Hernando Rodríguez-Correa, Ken Oyama, Victoria L. Sork & Paul F. Gugger
Local adaptation is a critical evolutionary process that allows plants to grow better in their local compared to nonnative habitat and results in species-wide geographic patterns of adaptive genetic variation. For forest tree species with a long generation time, this spatial genetic heterogeneity can shape the ability of trees to respond to rapid climate change. Here, we identify genomic variation that may confer local environmental adaptations and then predict the extent of adaptive mismatch under...

Data from: Males increase call frequency, not intensity, in response to noise, revealing no Lombard effect in the little torrent frog

Longhui Zhao, Xiaoqian Sun, Qinghua Chen, Yue Yang, Jichao Wang, Jianghong Ran, Steven E. Brauth, Yezhong Tang & Jianguo Cui
Noise is one of the main factors that can influence the processes of sound communication across a wide range of animal groups. Although the effects of ambient noise on animal communication, including anthropogenic noise, have received increasing attention, few studies have examined changes in the fine structure of acoustic signals produced by vocalizing species in constantly noisy environments. Here, we used natural recordings to determine the associations between stream noise and call parameters in the...

Data from: Vegetation structure mediates a shift in predator avoidance behavior in a range-edge population

Cora A. Johnston & Rachel S. Smith
Where organisms encounter novel conditions during range expansion, behavioral changes suited to the new habitat can enhance survival. Behavioral changes that mitigate predation risk are particularly important for the persistence of range-edge populations, especially where plastic responses outpace genetic adaptation. We use a climate-driven spatial mismatch between the arboreal mangrove tree crab (Aratus pisonii) and its primary mangrove habitat to evaluate differences in predator avoidance behavior between populations in range-center mangroves and adjacent range-edge salt...

Data from: Quantifying ecological and social drivers of ecological surprise

Karen Filbee-Dexter, Celia C. Symons, Kristal Jones, Heather Haig, Jeremy Pittman, Steven M. Alexander, Matthew J. Burke & Heather A. Haig
1. A key challenge facing ecologists and ecosystem managers is understanding what drives unexpected shifts in ecosystems and limits the effectiveness of human interventions during these events. Research that integrates and analyzes data from natural and social systems can provide important insight for unraveling the complexity of these dynamics, and is a critical step towards development of evidence-based, whole systems management approaches. 2. To examine our ability to influence ecosystems that are behaving in unexpected...

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: Phenological responses to multiple environmental drivers under climate change: insights from a long-term observational study and a manipulative field experiment

Susana M. Wadgymar, Jane E. Ogilvie, David W. Inouye, Arthur E. Weis & Jill T. Anderson
• Climate change has induced pronounced shifts in the reproductive phenology of plants, yet we know little about which environmental factors contribute to interspecific variation in responses and their effects on fitness. • We integrate data from a 43-year record of first flowering for six species in subalpine Colorado meadows with a 3-year snow manipulation experiment on the perennial forb Boechera stricta (Brassicaceae) from the same site. We analyze shifts in the onset of flowering...

Data from: Eco-evolutionary rescue promotes host-pathogen coexistence

Graziella V. DiRenzo, Elise F. Zipkin, Evan H. Campbell Grant, J. Andrew Royle, Ana V. Longo, Kelly R. Zamudio & Karen R. Lips
Emerging infectious pathogens are responsible for some of the most severe host mass-mortality events in wild populations. Yet, effective pathogen control strategies are notoriously difficult to identify, in part because quantifying and forecasting pathogen spread and disease dynamics is challenging. Following an outbreak, hosts must cope with the presence of the pathogen, leading to host-pathogen coexistence or extirpation. Despite decades of research, little is known about host-pathogen coexistence post-outbreak when low host abundances and cryptic...

Data from: Aggregation but not organo-metal complexes contributed to C storage in tidal freshwater wetland soils

Christine E. Maietta, Zachary A. Bernstein, Joshua R. Gaimaro, Victoria L. Monsaint-Queeney, Jeffrey Buyer, Martin Rabenhorst, Andrew H. Baldwin & Stephanie A. Yarwood
One of the many goals of wetland restoration is to promote the long-term storage of carbon (C) in the terrestrial biosphere. Unfortunately, soil C reservoirs in restored wetlands are slow to accumulate even after hydrology and plant communities are reestablished. Oftentimes wetland restoration changes the soil matrix and thus can dramatically alter how soil C is stored and processed. Our research investigated whether soil organic matter (SOM) preservation theories derived from studies in non-wetland soil...

Data from: Regional paleoclimates and local consequences: Integrating GIS analysis of diachronic settlement patterns and process-based agroecosystem modeling of potential agricultural productivity in Provence (France)

Daniel Contreras, Eneko Hiriart, Alberte Bondeau, Alan Kirman, Joël Guiot, Loup Bernard, Romain Suarez, Sander Van Der Leeuw & Daniel A. Contreras
Holocene climate variability in the Mediterranean Basin is often cited as a potential driver of societal change, but the mechanisms of this putative influence are generally little explored. In this paper we integrate two tools - agro-ecosystem modeling of potential agricultural yields and spatial analysis of archaeological settlement pattern data - in order to examine the human consequences of past climatic changes. Focusing on a case study in Provence (France), we adapt an agro-ecosystem model...

Data from: Diversification by host switching and dispersal shaped the diversity and distribution of avian malaria parasites in Amazonia

Alan Fecchio, Jeffrey Andrew Bell, Michael David Collins, Izeni Pires Farias, Christopher Harry Trisos, Joseph Andrew Tobias, Vasyl Volodymyr Tkach, Jason David Weckstein, Robert Eric Ricklefs & Henrique Batalha-Filho
Understanding how pathogens and parasites diversify through time and space is fundamental to predicting emerging infectious diseases. Here, we use biogeographic, coevolutionary and phylogenetic analyses to describe the origin, diversity, and distribution of avian malaria parasites in the most diverse avifauna on Earth. We first performed phylogenetic analyses using the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene to determine relationships among parasite lineages. Then, we estimated divergence times and reconstructed ancestral areas to uncover how landscape...

Data from: Salamander climbing behavior varies among species and is correlated with community composition

Tori D. Mezebish, August Blackman & Alexander J. Novarro
Species coexistence is often facilitated by behavioral strategies that minimize competition for limited resources. Terrestrial, lungless salamanders (genus Plethodon) coexist in predictable assemblages of body size guilds, but little is known about the behavioral mechanisms that promote such coexistence. Here, we considered the hypothesis that Plethodon salamanders use climbing behavior to reduce competitive interactions, thereby promoting coexistence through spatial partitioning. To explore this hypothesis, we quantified the frequency of climbing behavior at field sites where...

Data from: Archaeopedological analysis of colluvial deposits in favourable and unfavourable areas: reconstruction of land use dynamics in SW Germany

Jessica Henkner, Jan Ahlrichs, Sean Downey, Markus Fuchs, Bruce James, Andrea Junge, Thomas Knopf, Thomas Scholten & Peter Kühn
Colluvial deposits, as the correlate sediments of human induced soil erosion, depict an excellent archive of land use and landscape history as representatives of human-environment interactions. This study establishes a chronostratigraphy of colluvial deposits and reconstructs past land use dynamics in the Swabian Jura, the Baar and the Black Forest in SW Germany. In the agriculturally favourable Baar area multiple main phases of colluvial deposition, and thus intensified land use, can be identified from the...

Data from: RADseq data reveal ancient, but not pervasive, introgression between Californian tree and scrub oak species (Quercus sect. Quercus: Fagaceae)

Bernard Y. Kim, Xinzeng Wei, Sorel Fitz-Gibbon, Kirk E. Lohmueller, Joaquin Ortego, Paul F. Gugger & Victoria L. Sork
A long-term debate in evolutionary biology is the extent to which reproductive isolation is a necessary element of speciation. Hybridizing plants in general are cited as evidence against this notion and oaks specifically have been used as the classic example of species maintenance without reproductive isolation. Here, we use thousands of SNPs generated by RAD sequencing to describe the phylogeny of a set of sympatric white oak species in California and then test whether these...

Data from: Opening the door to the past: accessing phylogenetic, pathogen, and population data from museum curated bees

Anthony D. Vaudo, Megan L. Fritz & Margarita M. López-Uribe
Tens of thousands of insects are deposited in collections every year as a result of survey-based studies that aim to investigate ecological questions. DNA-based techniques can expand the utility of these collections to explore their demographic and evolutionary history, temporal changes in their abundance, and pathogen dynamics. Using museum collections of the non-model bee species Eucera (Peponapis) pruinosa Say 1837 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Eucerini), we developed a standard minimally-destructive and budget-friendly protocol to extract DNA and...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    30

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Maryland, College Park
    30
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    5
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    3
  • Biodiversity Research Institute
    3
  • The Ohio State University
    3
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
    3
  • Columbia University
    2