7 Works

A “Dirty” Footprint: Soil macrofauna biodiversity and fertility in Amazonian Dark Earths and adjacent soils

Wilian C. Demetrio, Ana C. Conrado, Agno N. S. Acioli, Alexandre C. Ferreira, Marie L. C. Bartz, Samuel W. James, Elodie Silva, Lilianne S. Maia, Gilvan C. Martins, Rodrigo S. Macedo, David W. G. Stanton, Patrick Lavelle, Elena Velasquez, Anne Zangerlé, Rafaella Barbosa, Sandra C. Tapia‐Coral, Aleksander W. Muniz, Alessandra Santos, Talita Ferreira, Rodrigo F. Segalla, Thibaud Decaëns, Herlon S. Nadolny, Clara P. Peña‐Venegas, Cláudia M. B. F. Maia, Amarildo Pasini … & George G. Brown
Amazonian rainforests once thought to hold an innate pristine wilderness, are increasingly known to have been densely inhabited by populations showing a diverse and complex cultural background prior to European arrival. To what extent these societies impacted their landscape is unclear. Amazonian Dark Earths (ADEs) are fertile soils found throughout the Amazon Basin, created by pre-Columbian societies as a result of more sedentary habits. Much is known of the chemistry of these soils, yet their...

A worldwide assessment of soil macroinvertebrate communities

Patrick Lavelle, Jerome Mathieu, Alister Spain, George Brown, Carlos Fragoso, Emmanuel Lapied, Adriana De Aquino, Isabelle Barois, Edmundo Barrios, Eleusa Barros, Juan Camilo Bedano, Eric Blanchart, Mark Caulfield, Yamileth Chagueza, Jun Dai, Thibaud Decaens, Anahi Domninquez, Yamileth Dominquez, Alex Feijoo, Patricia Folgaraiti, Steven Fonte, Norma Gorosito, Esperanza Huerta, Juan Jose Jimenez, Courtland Kelly … & Chi Zhang
Soil macroinvertebrate communities have been assessed worldwide using the standard ISO/TSBF sampling procedure. The Macrofauna database currently comprises 3694 sites distributed throughout 41 countries, from 55º S latitude to 57ºN, sea level to over 4000m in elevation, in total annual total rainfall regimes between 500 and >3000mm and 5 to 32ºC mean temperature. These communities are significantly influenced by climatic parameters, soil texture and vegetation cover. Abundance and diversity were highest in tropical rain forests...

Interviews from field research in Rio de Janeiro State - Brazil

Nádia Aun & Renato Linhares De Assis
This paper presents a case study on organic agriculture at Região Serrana Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. We sought to understand what was the role of organic farming, and if it can be considered as an aggregating element between different kind of people or groups who were located in the same region. The methodology used to carry out this investigation was based on the concept of the Rural Network, which enabled us to comprehend...

Data and scripts from: Phylogenomic analysis points to a South American origin of Manihot and illuminates the primary gene pool of cassava

Marcelo F. Simon, J. Moises Mendoza F., Márcio Lacerda Lopes Martins, Sergei V. Drovetski, Natalia A. S. Przelomska, Hope Loiselle, Taciana B. Cavalcanti, Peter W. Inglis, Natalie G. Mueller, Robin G. Allaby, Fábio De Oliveira Freitas & Logan Kistler
The genus Manihot, with around 120 known species, is native to a wide range of habitats and regions in the tropical and subtropical Americas. Its high species richness and recent diversification only ~6Mya have significantly complicated previous phylogenetic analyses. Several basic elements of Manihot evolutionary history therefore remain unresolved. Here, we conduct a comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of Manihot, focusing on exhaustive sampling of South American taxa. We find that two recently described species from northeast...

Precipitation, water level and descriptive statistics

Marcelo Medeiros, Marcelo Simon, Washington Oliveira & Pamela Moser
Extreme weather events and the presence of mega-hydroelectric dams, when combined, present an emerging threat to natural habitats in the Amazon region. To understand the magnitude of these impacts, we used remote sensing data to assess forest loss in areas affected by the extreme 2014 flood in the entire Madeira River basin, the location of two mega-dams. In addition, forest plots (26 ha) were monitored between 2011 and 2015 (14,328 trees) in order to evaluate...

Quantitative interactions: the disease outcome of Botrytis cinerea across the plant kingdom

Celine Caseys, Gongjun Shi, Nicole Soltis, Raoni Gwinner, Jason Corwin, Susanna Atwell & Daniel Kliebenstein
Botrytis cinerea is a fungal pathogen that causes necrotic disease on more than a thousand known hosts widely spread across the plant kingdom. How B. cinerea interacts with such extensive host diversity remains largely unknown. To address this question, we generated an infectivity matrix of 98 strains of B. cinerea on 90 genotypes representing eight host plants. This experimental infectivity matrix revealed that the disease outcome is largely explained by variations in either the host...

Negative impacts of dominance on bee communities: Does the influence of invasive honey bees differ from native bees?

Lucas Alejandro Garibaldi, Lucas Garibaldi, Néstor Pérez-Méndez, Guaraci Cordeiro, Alice Hughes, Michael Orr, Isabel Alves Dos Santos, Breno Freitas, Favízia Freitas De Oliveira, Gretchen Lebuhn, Ignasi Bartomeus, Marcelo Aizen, Patricia Andrade, Betina Blochtein, Danilo Boscolo, Patricia Drumond, Maria Gaglianone, Barbara Gemmill-Herren, Rosana Halinski, Cristiane Krug, Marcia Maues, Lucia Piedade Kiill, Mardiore Pinheiro, Carmen Pires & Blandina Felipe Viana
Invasive species can reach high abundances and dominate native environments. One of the most impressive examples of ecological invasions is the spread of the African sub-species of the honey bee throughout the Americas, starting from its introduction in a single locality in Brazil. The invasive honey bee is expected to more negatively impact bee community abundance and diversity than native dominant species, but this has not been tested previously. We developed a comprehensive and systematic...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation
    7
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    2
  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    2
  • University of Brasília
    2
  • National University of Colombia
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • National University of Río Cuarto
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    1