61 Works

Data from: Autosomal and X linked additive genetic variation for lifespan and aging: comparisons within and between the sexes in Drosophila melanogaster

Robert M. Griffin, Holger Schielzeth & Urban Friberg
Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster. To achieve unbiased...

Data from: Crop-to-wild gene flow and its fitness consequences for a wild fruit tree: towards a comprehensive conservation strategy of the wild apple in Europe

Alice Feurtey, Amandine Cornille, Jacqui A. Shykoff, Alodie Snirc & Tatiana Giraud
Crop-to-wild gene flow can reduce the fitness and genetic integrity of wild species. Malus sylvestris, the European crabapple fruit tree, in particular is threatened by the disappearance of its habitat and by gene flow from its domesticated relative, Malus domestica. With the aims of evaluating threats for M. sylvestris and of formulating recommendations for its conservation, we studied here, using microsatellite markers and growth experiments: i) hybridization rates in seeds and trees from a French...

Data from: Resource- and pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits

Nina Sletvold, Matthew Tye & Jon Ågren
Female reproductive success is predicted to be simultaneously limited by the availability of pollen and resources. Selection on floral traits results from both factors, but their relative importance and interaction is poorly understood. We increased nutrient and pollen availability of the orchid Dactylorhiza lapponica in a factorial experiment to quantify resource- and pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits. Hand-pollination increased female fitness (number of fruits × mean fruit mass) by 74% in both nutrient treatments, whereas...

Data from: Global population divergence and admixture of the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus)

Emily E. Puckett, Jane Park, Matthew Combs, Michael J. Blum, Juliet E. Bryant, Adalgisa Caccone, Federico Costa, Eva E. Deinum, Alexandra Esther, Chelsea G. Himsworth, Peter D. Keightley, Albert Ko, Ake Lundkvist, Lorraine M. McElhinney, Serge Morand, Judith Robins, James Russell, Tanja M. Strand, Olga Suarez, Lisa Yon & Jason Munshi-South
Native to China and Mongolia, the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) now enjoys a worldwide distribution. While black rats and the house mouse tracked the regional development of human agricultural settlements, brown rats did not appear in Europe until the 1500s, suggesting their range expansion was a response to relatively recent increases in global trade. We inferred the global phylogeography of brown rats using 32 k SNPs, and detected 13 evolutionary clusters within five expansion routes....

Data from: Proto-cooperation: group hunting sailfish improve hunting success by alternating attacks on grouping prey

James E. Herbert-Read, Pawel Romanczuk, Stefan Krause, Daniel Strömbom, Pierre Couillaud, Paolo Domenici, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers, Stefano Marras, John F. Steffensen, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Jens Krause, Alexander D. M. Wilson & Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers
We present evidence of a novel form of group hunting. Individual sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) alternate attacks with other group members on their schooling prey (Sardinella aurita). While only 24% of attacks result in prey capture, multiple prey are injured in 95% of attacks, resulting in an increase of injured fish in the school with the number of attacks. How quickly prey are captured is positively correlated with the level of injury of the school, suggesting...

Data from: A new method for reconstructing brain morphology: applying the brain-neurocranial spatial relationship in an extant lungfish to a fossil endocast

Alice M. Clement, Robin Strand, Johan Nysjö, John A. Long & Per E. Ahlberg
Lungfish first appeared in the geological record over 410 million years ago and are the closest living group of fish to the tetrapods. Palaeoneurological investigations into the group show that unlike numerous other fishes—but more similar to those in tetrapods—lungfish appear to have had a close fit between the brain and the cranial cavity that housed it. As such, researchers can use the endocast of fossil taxa (an internal cast of the cranial cavity) both...

Data from: The price of looking sexy: visual ecology of a three level predator-prey system

David Outomuro, Linus Söderquist, Frank Johansson, Anders Ödeen & Karin Nordström
Colour signals and colour vision play a pivotal role in intraspecific communication and predator-prey interactions. However, the costs of expressing conspicuous sexual signals at multiple trophic levels have been largely overlooked. Sexual signals can also experience character displacement in sympatric populations of closely-related species, leading to potential changes in conspicuousness. We here investigate a bird-damselfly-fruit fly predator-prey system, where two closely related damselfly species have conspicuous, sexually selected wing coloration. The damselflies can occur in...

Data from: Strong pollinator-mediated selection for increased flower brightness and contrast in a deceptive orchid

Nina Sletvold, Judith Trunschke, Mart Smit, Jeffrey Verbeek & Jon Ågren
Contrasting flower color patterns that putatively attract or direct pollinators towards a reward are common among angiosperms. In the deceptive orchid Anacamptis morio, the lower petal, which makes up most of the floral display, has a light central patch with dark markings. Within populations, there is pronounced variation in petal brightness, patch size, amount of dark markings, and contrast between patch and petal margin. We tested whether pollinators mediate selection on these color traits and...

Data from: Phylogeny and generic delimitation in Molluginaceae, new pigment data in Caryophyllales, and the new family Corbichoniaceae

Mats Thulin, Abigail J. Moore, Hesham El-Seedi, Anders Larsson, Pascal-Antoine Christin & Erika J. Edwards
The circumscription of Molluginaceae has changed radically in recent years, with Corbichonia being moved to Lophiocarpaceae, Limeum to Limeaceae, Macarthuria to Macarthuriaceae and all species of Hypertelis, except the type, to Kewa in Kewaceae. In a broad analysis of core Caryophyllales using plastid trnK-matK and rbcL sequences, the position of Molluginaceae in a strict sense as sister to the Portulacineae clade is corroborated, as are the positions of Corbichonia, Limeum and Kewa outside the family....

Data from: Family-assisted inference of the genetic architecture of MHC variation

Arnaud Gaigher, Reto Burri, Walid H. Gharib, Pierre Taberlet, Alexandre Roulin & Luca Fumagalli
With their direct link to individual fitness, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a popular system to study the evolution of adaptive genetic diversity. However, owing to the highly dynamic evolution of the MHC region, the isolation, characterization and genotyping of MHC genes remain a major challenge. While high-throughput sequencing technologies now provide unprecedented resolution of the high allelic diversity observed at the MHC, in many species, it remains unclear (i) how alleles...

Data from: Ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi respond differently to long-term experimentally increased snow depth in the High Arctic

Sunil Mundra, Rune Halvorsen, Håvard Kauserud, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Bo Elberling, Elisabeth J. Cooper & Pernille Bronken Eidesen
Changing climate is expected to alter precipitation patterns in the Arctic, with consequences for subsurface temperature and moisture conditions, community structure, and nutrient mobilization through microbial belowground processes. Here, we address the effect of increased snow depth on the variation in species richness and community structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and saprotrophic fungi. Soil samples were collected weekly from mid-July to mid-September in both control and deep snow plots. Richness of ECM fungi was lower, while...

Data from: The extent and meaning of hybridization and introgression between Siberian spruce (Picea obovata) and Norway spruce (Picea abies): cryptic refugia as stepping stones to the west?

Yoshiaki Tsuda, Jun Chen, Michael Stocks, Thomas Källman, Jørn Henrik Sønstebø, Laura Parducci, Vladimir Semerikov, Christoph Sperisen, Dmitry Politov, Tiina Ronkainen, Minna Väliranta, Giovanni Giuseppe Vendramini, Mari Mette Tollefsrud, Martin Lascoux & Giovanni Giuseppe Vendramin
Boreal species were repeatedly exposed to ice ages and went through cycles of contraction and expansion while sister species alternated periods of contact and isolation. The resulting genetic structure is consequently complex, and demographic inferences are intrinsically challenging. The range of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Siberian spruce (Picea obovata) covers most of northern Eurasia; yet their geographical limits and histories remain poorly understood. To delineate the hybrid zone between the two species and reconstruct...

Data from: Females discriminate against heterospecific sperm in a natural hybrid zone

Emily Rebecca Alison Cramer, Murielle Ålund, S. Eryn McFarlane, Arild Johnsen & Anna Qvarnström
When hybridization is maladaptive, species-specific mate preferences are selectively favored, but low mate availability may constrain species-assortative pairing. Females paired to heterospecifics may then benefit by copulating with multiple males and subsequently favoring sperm of conspecifics. Whether such mechanisms for biasing paternity toward conspecifics act as important reproductive barriers in socially monogamous vertebrate species remains to be determined. We use a combination of long-term breeding records from a natural hybrid zone between collared and pied...

Data from: Competition-driven build-up of habitat isolation and selection favouring dispersal modification in a young avian hybrid zone

Jakub Rybinski, Päivi M. Sirkiä, S. Eryn McFarlane, Niclas Vallin, David Wheatcroft, Murielle Ålund & Anna Qvarnström
Competition-driven evolution of habitat isolation is an important mechanism of ecological speciation but empirical support for this process is often indirect. We examined how an on-going displacement of pied flycatchers from their preferred breeding habitat by collared flycatchers in a young secondary contact zone is associated with (a) access to an important food resource (caterpillar larvae), (b) immigration of pied flycatchers in relation to habitat quality, and (c) the risk of hybridization in relation to...

Data from: Sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis and the evolution of mitochondrial bioenergetics, ageing and life history in seed beetles

Mirko Dorđević, Biljana Stojkovic, Uroš Savković, Elina Immonen, Nikola Tucic, Jelica Jelica Lazarević & Göran Arnqvist
The role of mitochondrial DNA for the evolution of life history traits remains debated. We examined mitonuclear effects on the activity of the multi-subunit complex of the electron transport chain (ETC) involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) across lines of the seed beetle Acanthoscelides obtectus, selected for a short (E) or a long (L) life for more than >160 generations. We constructed and phenotyped mitonuclear introgression lines, which allowed us to assess the independent effects of...

Data from: Effect of haemosporidian infections on host survival and recapture rate in the blue tit

Edyta Podmokła, Anna Dubiec, Szymon M. Drobniak, Joanna Sudyka, Adam Krupski, Aneta Arct, Lars Gustafsson & Mariusz Cichoń
Parasites are ubiquitous in the wild and by imposing fitness costs on their hosts they constitute an important selection factor. One of the most common parasites of wild birds are Plasmodium and Haemoproteus, protozoans inhabiting the blood, which cause avian malaria and malaria-like disease, respectively. Although they are expected to cause negative effects in infected individuals, in many cases studies in natural populations failed to detect such effect. Using data from seven breeding seasons (2008...

Data from: Changing the habitat: the evolution of inter-correlated traits to escape from predators

Dirk J. Mikolajewski, Kristin Scharnweber, Bin Jiang, Sebastian Leicht, Ruediger Mauersberger & Frank Johansson
Burst escape speed is an effective and widely used behaviour for evading predators, with burst escape speed relying on several different morphological features. However, we know little about how behavioural and underlying morphological attributes change in concert as a response to changes in selective predation regime. We studied inter-correlated trait differentiation of body shape and burst-swim-mediating morphology in response to a habitat shift related reduction in burst escape speed using larvae of the dragonfly genus...

Data from: Photosynthesis, growth, and decay traits in Sphagnum – a multispecies comparison

Fia Bengtsson, Gustaf Granath & Håkan Rydin
Peat mosses (Sphagnum) largely govern carbon sequestration in Northern Hemisphere peatlands. We investigated functional traits related to growth and decomposition in Sphagnum species. We tested the importance of environment and phylogeny in driving species traits and investigated trade-offs among them. We selected 15 globally important Sphagnum species, representing four sections (subgenera) and a range of peatland habitats. We measured rates of photosynthesis and decomposition in standard laboratory conditions as measures of innate growth and decay...

Data from: Multi-trait aposematic signal in Batesian mimicry

David Outomuro, Pedro Ángel-Giraldo, Alberto Corral-Lopez & Emilio Realpe
Batesian mimics can parasitize Müllerian mimicry rings mimicking the warning color signal. The evolutionary success of Batesian mimics can increase adding complexity to the signal by behavioral and locomotor mimicry. We investigated three fundamental morphological and locomotor traits in a Neotropical mimicry ring based on Ithomiini butterflies and parasitized by Polythoridae damselflies: wing color, wing shape, and flight style. The study species have wings with a subapical white patch, considered the aposematic signal, and a...

Data from: Genetic divergence and isolation by thermal environment in geothermal populations of an aquatic invertebrate

Magnus P. Johansson, María Quintela & Anssi Laurila
JEB_2016_Genetic structure across thermal environmentsAFLP raw data.

Data from: Evolutionary potential in the Alpine: trait heritabilities and performance variation of the dwarf willow Salix herbacea from different elevations and microhabitats

Janosch Sedlacek, Andrés J. Cortés, Julia Wheeler, Oliver Bossdorf, Guenter Hoch, Jaroslav Klápště, Christian Lexer, Christian Rixen, Sonja Wipf, Sophie Karrenberg & Mark Van Kleunen
Alpine ecosystems are seriously threatened by climate change. One of the key mechanisms by which plants can adapt to changing environmental conditions is through evolutionary change. However, we still know little about the evolutionary potential in wild populations of long-lived alpine plants. Here, we investigated heritabilities of phenological traits, leaf size, and performance traits in natural populations of the long-lived alpine dwarf shrub Salix herbacea using relatedness estimates inferred from SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) markers....

Data from: Genomic and phenotypic differentiation of Arabidopsis thaliana along altitudinal gradients in the North Italian Alps

Torsten Günther, Christian Lampei, Ivan Barilar & Karl J. Schmid
Altitudinal gradients in mountain regions are short-range clines of different environmental parameters such as temperature or radiation. We investigated genomic and phenotypic signatures of adaptation to such gradients in five Arabidopsis thaliana populations from the North Italian Alps that originated from 580 to 2350 m altitude by resequencing pools of 19–29 individuals from each population. The sample includes two pairs of low- and high-altitude populations from two different valleys. High-altitude populations showed a lower nucleotide...

Data from: Divergence history of the Carpathian and smooth newts modelled in space and time

Piotr ZIeliński, Krystyna Nadachowska-Brzyska, Katarzyna Dudek & Wiesław Babik
Information about demographic history is essential for the understanding of the processes of divergence and speciation. Patterns of genetic variation within and between closely related species provide insights into the history of their interactions. Here, we investigated historical demography and genetic exchange between the Carpathian (Lissotriton montandoni, Lm) and smooth (L. vulgaris, Lv) newts. We combine an extensive geographical sampling and multilocus nuclear sequence data with the approximate Bayesian computation framework to test alternative scenarios...

Data from: SNP discovery in candidate adaptive genes using exon capture in a free-ranging alpine ungulate

Gretchen H. Roffler, Stephen J. Amish, Seth Smith, Ted Cosart, Marty Kardos, Michael K. Schwartz & Gordon Luikart
Identification of genes underlying genomic signatures of natural selection is key to understanding adaptation to local conditions. We used targeted resequencing to identify SNP markers in 5,321 candidate adaptive genes associated with known immunological, metabolic, and growth functions in ovids and other ungulates. We selectively targeted 8,161 exons in protein-coding and nearby 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of chosen candidate genes. Targeted sequences were taken from bighorn sheep (O. canadensis) exon capture data and directly...

Data from: The cranial endocast of Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi) and the interrelationships of stem-group lungfishes

Alice M. Clement, Tom J. Challands, John A. Long & Per E. Ahlberg
The first virtual cranial endocast of a lungfish from the Early Devonian, Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi, is described. Dipnorhynchus, only the fourth Devonian lungfish for which a near complete cranial endocast is known, is a key taxon for clarifying primitive character states within the group. A ventrally-expanded telencephalic cavity is present in the endocast of Dipnorhynchus demonstrating that this is the primitive state for “true” Dipnoi. Dipnorhynchus also possesses a utricular recess differentiated from the sacculolagenar pouch...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    61

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    61

Affiliations

  • Uppsala University
    61
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • Flinders University
    3
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • Institute of Biosciences and Bioresources
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • University of Paris-Sud
    2