67 Works

Data from: Female fecundity variation affects reproducibility of experiments on host plant preference and acceptance in a phytophagous insect

Alexander Schäpers, Hampus Petrén, Christopher W. Wheat, Christer Wiklund & Magne Friberg
Reproducibility is a scientific cornerstone. Many recent studies, however, describe a reproducibility crisis and call for assessments of reproducibility across scientific domains. Here, we explore the reproducibility of a classic ecological experiment—that of assessing female host plant preference and acceptance in phytophagous insects, a group in which host specialization is a key driver of diversification. We exposed multiple cohorts of Pieris napi butterflies from the same population to traditional host acceptance and preference tests on...

Data from: Experience buffers extrinsic mortality in a group-living bird species

Michael Griesser, Emeline Mourocq, Jonathan Barnaby, Katharine Bowegen, Sönke Eggers, Kevin Fletcher, Radoslav Kozma, Franziska Kurz, Anssi Laurila, Magdalena Nystrand, Enrico Sorato, Jan Ekman & Katharine M. Bowgen
Extrinsic mortality has a strong impact on the evolution of life-histories, prey morphology and behavioural adaptations, but for many animals the causes of mortality are poorly understood. Predation is an important driver of extrinsic mortality and mobile animals form groups in response to increased predation risk. Furthermore, in many species juveniles suffer higher mortality than older individuals, which may reflect a lower phenotypic quality, lower competitiveness, or a lack of antipredator or foraging skills. Here...

Data from: Evolution of brain region volumes during artificial selection for relative brain size

Alexander Kotrschal, Hong-Li Zeng, Wouter Van Der Bijl, Caroline Öhman-Mägi, Kurt Kotrschal, Kristiaan Pelckmans & Niclas Kolm
The vertebrate brain shows an extremely conserved layout across taxa. Still, the relative sizes of separate brain regions vary markedly between species. One interesting pattern is that larger brains seem associated with increased relative sizes only of certain brain regions, for instance telencephalon and cerebellum. Till now, the evolutionary association between separate brain regions and overall brain size is based on comparative evidence and remains experimentally untested. Here we test the evolutionary response of brain...

Data from: In situ modeling of multimodal floral cues attracting wild pollinators across environments

Karin Nordström, Josefin Dahlbom, V. S. Pragadheesh, Suhrid Ghosh, Amadeus Olsson, Olga Dyakova, Shravanti Krishna Suresh & Shannon B. Olsson
With more than 80% of flowering plant species specialized for animal pollination, understanding how wild pollinators utilize resources across environments can encourage efficient planting and maintenance strategies to maximize pollination and establish resilience in the face of environmental change. A fundamental question is how generalist pollinators recognize “flower objects” in vastly different ecologies and environments. On one hand, pollinators could employ a specific set of floral cues regardless of environment. Alternatively, wild pollinators could recognize...

Data from: Reproductive character displacement of female, but not male song discrimination in an avian hybrid zone

David Wheatcroft & Anna Qvarnstrom
Divergence of male sexual signals and female preferences for those signals often maintains reproductive boundaries between closely related, co-occurring species. However, contrasting sources of selection, such as interspecific competition, can lead to weak divergence or even convergence of sexual signals in sympatry. When signals converge, assortative mating can be maintained if the mating preferences of females diverge in sympatry (reproductive character displacement; RCD), but there are few explicit examples. Pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) are sympatric...

Data from: Does habitat specialization shape the evolutionary potential of wild bird populations?

Ivain Martinossi-Allibert, Joanne Clavel, Simon Ducatez, I. Le Viol & Celine Teplitsky
Because specialist species evolved in more temporally and spatially homogeneous environments than generalist species, they are supposed to experience less fluctuating selection. For this reason, we expect specialists to show lower overall genetic variation as compared to generalists. We also expect populations from specialist species to be smaller and more fragmented, with lower neutral genetic diversity. We tested these hypotheses by investigating patterns of genetic diversity along a habitat specialization gradient in wild birds, based...

Data from: Body size affects the strength of social interactions and spatial organization of a schooling fish (Pseudomugil signifer)

Maksym Romenskyy, James E. Herbert-Read, Ashley J. W. Ward, David J.T. Sumpter & David J. T. Sumpter
While a rich variety of self-propelled particle models propose to explain the collective motion of fish and other animals, rigorous statistical comparison between models and data remains a challenge. Plausible models should be flexible enough to capture changes in the collective behaviour of animal groups at their different developmental stages and group sizes. Here, we analyse the statistical properties of schooling fish (Pseudomugil signifer) through a combination of experiments and simulations. We make novel use...

Data from: Automated deep-phenotyping of the vertebrate brain

Amin Allalou, Yuelong Wu, Mostafa Ghannad-Rezaie, Peter M. Eimon, Mehmet Faith Yanik & Mehmet Fatih Yanik
Here we describe an automated platform suitable for large-scale deep-phenotyping of zebrafish mutant lines, which uses optical projection tomography to rapidly image brain-specific gene expression patterns in 3D at cellular resolution. Registration algorithms and correlation analysis are then used to compare 3D expression patterns, to automatically detect all statistically significant alterations in mutants, and to map them onto a brain atlas. Automated deep-phenotyping of a mutation in the master transcriptional regulator fezf2 not only detects...

Data from: Veronica officinalis product authentication using DNA metabarcoding and HPLC-MS reveals widespread adulteration with Veronica chamaedrys

Ancuta C. Raclariu, Andrei Mocan, Madalina Oana Popa, Laurian Vlase, Mihael C. Ichim, Gianina Crisan, Anne Krag Brysting & Hugo De Boer
Studying herbal products derived from local and traditional knowledge and their value chains is one of the main challenges in ethnopharmacology. The majority of these products have a long history of use, but non-harmonized trade and differences in regulatory policies between countries impact their value chains and lead to concerns over product efficacy, safety and quality. Veronica officinalis L. (common speedwell), a member of Plantaginaceae family, has a long history of use in European traditional...

Data from: Insights into the genetic architecture of morphological traits in two passerine bird species

Catarina N. S. Silva, S. Eryn McFarlane, Ingerid J. Hagen, Lars Rönnegård, Anna M. Billing, Thomas Kvalnes, Petri Kemppainen, Bernt Rønning, Thor Harald Ringsby, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Anna Qvarnström, Hans Ellegren, Henrik Jensen & Arild Husby
Knowledge about the underlying genetic architecture of phenotypic traits is needed to understand and predict their evolutionary dynamics. The number of causal loci, magnitude of their effects and location in the genome is however still largely unknown. Here we use genome-wide SNP data from two large-scale datasets on house sparrows and collared flycatchers to examine the genetic architecture of different morphological traits (tarsus length, wing length, body mass, bill depth, bill length, total and visible...

Data from: Climate and anthropogenic factors determine site occupancy in Scotland's Northern-range badger population: implications of context-dependent responses under environmental change

André P. Silva, Gonçalo Curveira-Santos, Kerry Kilshaw, Chris Newman, David W. Macdonald, Luciana G. Simões & Luís M. Rosalino
Aim In the light of human-induced rapid environmental change (HIREC), populations are exposed to ever-greater bioclimatic stress at the edge of a species’ historic range. The distribution dynamics of European badgers (Meles meles) at their southern edge are linked tightly to climatic variability. We contribute critical data on how climatic context and local factors determine site occupancy in a northern-range population. Location Eleven study areas (averaging ~21.3 km2) spread over ~50,000 km2 in Northern Scotland....

Data from: A crush on small fungi: an efficient and quick method for obtaining DNA from minute ascomycetes

Henrik Sundberg, Stefan Ekman & Åsa Kruys
1. We have developed a reliable technique for extracting DNA from single microscopic fungal thalli, including efficient cell disruption and transfer of cell content for subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The technique was primarily developed for members of the ascomycete order Laboulbeniales, which are minute fungi with tough cell walls that are exceedingly difficult to disrupt with standard extraction techniques. 2. Our method makes routine amplification of DNA from single thalli possible, even from small...

Data from: Specificity of fungal associations of Pyroleae and Monotropa hypopitys during germination and seedling development

Veronika A Johansson, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Urmas Köljalg & Ove Eriksson
Mycoheterotrophic plants obtain organic carbon from associated mycorrhizal fungi, fully or partially. Angiosperms with this form of nutrition possess exceptionally small 'dust seeds' which after germination develop 'seedlings' that remain subterranean for several years, fully dependent on fungi for supply of carbon. Mycoheterotrophs which as adults have photosynthesis thus develop from full to partial mycoheterotrophy, or autotrophy, during ontogeny. Mycoheterotrophic plants may represent a gradient of variation in a parasitism-mutualism continuum, both among and within...

Data from: Hoverfly locomotor activity is resilient to external influence and intrinsic factors

Malin Thyselius & Karin Nordström
Hoverflies are found across the globe, with approximately 6000 species described worldwide. Many hoverflies are being used in agriculture and some are emerging as model species for laboratory experiments. As such it is valuable to know more about their activity. Like many other dipteran flies, Eristalis hoverflies have been suggested to be strongly diurnal, but this is based on qualitative visualization by human observers. To quantify how hoverfly activity depends on internal and external factors,...

Data from: Evolution of the selfing syndrome: anther orientation and herkogamy together determine reproductive assurance in a self-compatible plant

Per Toräng, Linus Vikström, Jörg Wunder, Stefan Wötzel, George Coupland & Jon Ågren
Capacity for autonomous self-fertilization provides reproductive assurance, has evolved repeatedly in the plant kingdom, and typically involves several changes in flower morphology and development (the selfing syndrome). Yet, the relative importance of different traits and trait combinations for efficient selfing and reproductive success in pollinator-poor environments is poorly known. In a series of experiments, we tested the importance of anther-stigma distance and the less studied trait anther orientation for efficiency of selfing in the perennial...

Data from: Enzyme architecture: modeling the operation of a hydrophobic clamp in catalysis by triosephosphate isomerase

Yashraj S. Kulkarni, Qinghua Liao, Dušan Petrovic, Dennis M. Krüger, Birgit Strodel, Tina L. Amyes, John P. Richard & Shina Caroline Lynn Kamerlin
Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is a proficient catalyst of the reversible isomerization of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to d-glyceraldehyde phosphate (GAP), via general base catalysis by E165. Historically, this enzyme has been an extremely important model system for understanding the fundamentals of biological catalysis. TIM is activated through an energetically demanding conformational change, which helps position the side chains of two key hydrophobic residues (I170 and L230), over the carboxylate side chain of E165. This is critical...

Data from: Cope’s rule and the adaptive landscape of dinosaur body size evolution

Roger B. J. Benson, Gene Hunt, Matthew T. Carrano & Nicolás Campione
The largest known dinosaurs weighed at least 20 million times as much as the smallest, indicating exceptional phenotypic divergence. Previous studies have focused on extreme giant sizes, tests of Cope's rule, and miniaturization on the line leading to birds. We use non-uniform macroevolutionary models based on Ornstein–Uhlenbeck and trend processes to unify these observations, asking: what patterns of evolutionary rates, directionality and constraint explain the diversification of dinosaur body mass? We find that dinosaur evolution...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Uppsala University
    67
  • Lund University
    6
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    5
  • University of Cambridge
    4
  • University of Zurich
    4
  • Stockholm University
    4
  • University of Lausanne
    3
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3