10 Works

Data from: Restoration and management for plant diversity enhances the rate of belowground ecosystem recovery

Ryan P. Klopf, Sara G. Baer, Elizabeth M. Bach & Johan Six
The positive relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning has been criticized for its applicability at large scales and in less controlled environments that are relevant to land management. To inform this gap between ecological theory and application, we compared recovery rates of belowground properties using two chronosequences consisting of continuously cultivated and independently restored fields with contrasting diversity management strategies: grasslands restored with high plant richness and managed for diversity with frequent burning (n=20)...

Data from: Illuminating prey selection in an insectivorous bat community, exposed to artificial light at night

Zachary M. Cravens, Veronica A. Brown, Timothy J. Divoll & Justin G. Boyles
1.Light pollution has been increasing around the globe and threatens to disturb natural rhythms of wildlife species. Artificial light impacts the behaviour of insectivorous bats in numerous ways, including foraging behaviour, which may in turn lead to altered prey selection. 2.In a manipulative field experiment, we collected faecal samples from six species of insectivorous bats in naturally dark and artificially lit conditions, and identified prey items using molecular methods to investigate effects of light pollution...

Data from: Genetic and epigenetic variation in Spartina alterniflora following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Marta Robertson, Aaron Schrey, Ashley Shayter, Christina J. Moss & Christina Richards
Catastrophic events offer unique opportunities to study rapid population response to stress in natural settings. In concert with genetic variation, epigenetic mechanisms like DNA methylation may offer a mechanism of rapid response to organisms facing severe environmental challenges, and contribute to the high resilience of species like Spartina alterniflora, a foundation salt marsh grass which shows resilience to strong environmental disturbance. In 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill devastated large portions of the coastline along...

Data from: Seed polyphenols in a diverse tropical plant community

Sofia Gripenberg, Jadranka Rota, Jorma Kim, S. Joseph Wright, Nancy C. Garwood, Evan C. Fricke, Paul-Camilo Zalamea & Juha-Pekka Salminen
1. Polyphenols are one of the most common groups of secondary metabolites in plants and thought to play a key role in enhancing plant fitness by protecting plants against enemies. Although enemy-inflicted mortality at the seed stage can be an important regulator of plant populations and a key determinant of community structure, few studies have assessed community-level patterns of polyphenol content in seeds. 2. We describe the distribution of the main seed polyphenol groups across...

Data from: Does landscape connectivity shape local and global social network structure in white-tailed deer?

Erin L. Koen, Marie I. Tosa, Clayton K. Nielsen & Eric M. Schauber
Intraspecific social behavior can be influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. While much research has focused on how characteristics of individuals influence their roles in social networks, we were interested in the role that landscape structure plays in animal sociality at both individual (local) and population (global) levels. We used female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Illinois, USA, to investigate the potential effect of landscape on social network structure by weighting the edges of...

Data from: Habitat patch use by fishers in the deciduous forest-dominated landscape of the central Appalachian Mountains, USA

Hance Ellington E., Sean W. Gess, Erin L. Koen, Joe Duchamp, Matthew Lovallo, Matthew R. Dzialak, Jeffrey Larkin, Joseph E. Duchamp & Jeffery L. Larkin
Fishers (Pekania pennanti) are often associated with the coniferous and mixed forests of the northern United States and central Canada, and their ecology has been studied extensively in portions of their distributional range. Recently, natural range expansion and reintroductions have led to recolonization by fishers of portions of the central Appalachian Mountains, USA, where deciduous forest is the dominant vegetation type. We used noninvasive hair snare surveys and microsatellite genetic analysis to detect fishers in...

Data from: Variation in thermal niche of a declining river-breeding frog: from counter-gradient responses to population distribution patterns

Alessandro Catenazzi & Sarah J. Kupferberg
When dams or climate change alter the thermal regimes of rivers, conditions can shift outside optimal ranges for aquatic poikilothermic vertebrates. Plasticity in thermal performance and preference, however, may allow temperature-vulnerable fauna to persist under challenging conditions. To determine the effects of thermal regime on Rana boylii (Ranidae), a threatened frog species endemic to rivers of California and Oregon, we quantified tadpole thermal preferences and performance in relation to thermal conditions. We monitored temperature and...

Data from: Divergence of thermal physiological traits in terrestrial breeding frogs along a tropical elevational gradient

Rudolf Von May, Alessandro Catenazzi, Ammon Corl, Roy Santa-Cruz, Ana Carolina Carnaval & Craig Moritz
Critical thermal limits are thought to be correlated with the elevational distribution of species living in tropical montane regions, but with upper limits being relatively invariant compared to lower limits. To test this hypothesis, we examined the variation of thermal physiological traits in a group of terrestrial breeding frogs (Craugastoridae) distributed along a tropical elevational gradient. We measured the critical thermal maximum (CTmax; n = 22 species) and critical thermal minimum (CTmin; n = 14...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses of Crassiclitellata support major Northern and Southern Hemisphere clades and a Pangaean origin for earthworms

Frank Anderson, Bronwyn Waller Williams, Kevin H. Horn, Christer Erséus, Kenneth M. Halanych, Scott R. Santos & Samuel W. James
Background: Earthworms (Crassiclitellata) are a diverse group of annelids of substantial ecological and economic importance. Earthworms are primarily terrestrial infaunal animals, and as such are probably rather poor natural dispersers. Therefore, the near global distribution of earthworms reflects an old and likely complex evolutionary history. Despite a long-standing interest in Crassiclitellata, relationships among and within major clades remain unresolved. Methods: In this study, we evaluate crassiclitellate phylogenetic relationships using 38 new transcriptomes in combination with...

Data from: Critical disease windows shaped by stress exposure alter allocation trade-offs between development and immunity

Lucas J. Kirschman, Erica J. Crespi & Robin W. Warne
1. Ubiquitous environmental stressors are often thought to alter animal susceptibility to pathogens and contribute to disease emergence. However, duration of exposure to a stressor is likely critical, because while chronic stress is often immunosuppressive, acute stress can temporarily enhance immune function. Furthermore, host susceptibility to stress and disease often varies with ontogeny; increasing during critical developmental windows. How the duration and timing of exposure to stressors interact to shape critical windows and influence disease...

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