177 Works

Data from: Genetic isolation within the malaria mosquito Anopheles melas

Kevin C. Deitz, Giridhar Athrey, Michael R. Reddy, Hans J. Overgaard, Abrahan Matias, Jawara Musa, Alessandra Della Torre, Vincenzo Petrarca, Joao Pinto, Anthony E. Kiszewski, Pierre Kengne, Carlo Costantini, Adalgisa Caccone, Michel A. Slotman, Musa Jawara & Giri Athrey
Anopheles melas is a brackish water-breeding member of the An. gambiae complex that is distributed along the coast of West Africa and is a major malaria vector within its range. Because little is known about the population structure of this species, we analyzed 15 microsatellite markers and 1,161 bp of mtDNA in 11 An. melas populations collected throughout its range. Compared to its sibling species An. gambiae, An. melas populations have a high level of...

Data from: Mapping and validation of a major QTL affecting resistance to pancreas disease (salmonid alphavirus) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

Serap Gonen, Matthew Baranski, Ingunn Thorland, Ashie Norris, Harald Grove, Petter Arnesen, Håvard Bakke, Sigbjørn Lien, Stephen C. Bishop & Ross D. Houston
Pancreas disease (PD), caused by a salmonid alphavirus (SAV), has a large negative economic and animal welfare impact on Atlantic salmon aquaculture. Evidence for genetic variation in host resistance to this disease has been reported, suggesting that selective breeding may potentially form an important component of disease control. The aim of this study was to explore the genetic architecture of resistance to PD, using survival data collected from two unrelated populations of Atlantic salmon; one...

Data from: Ethnolinguistic structuring of sorghum genetic diversity in Africa and the role of local seed systems

Ola T. Westengen, Mark Atam Okongo, Leo Onek, Trygve Berg, Hari Upadhyaya, Siri Dharma Kaur Khalsa, Siri Birkeland, Nils C. Stenseth & Anne K. Brysting
Sorghum is a drought-tolerant crop with a vital role in the livelihoods of millions of people in marginal areas. We examined genetic structure in this diverse crop in Africa. On the continent-wide scale, we identified three major sorghum populations (Central, Southern, and Northern) that are associated with the distribution of ethnolinguistic groups on the continent. The codistribution of the Central sorghum population and the Nilo-Saharan language family supports a proposed hypothesis about a close and...

Data from: A genome-wide association study identifies a region strongly associated with symmetrical onychomadesis on chromosome 12 in dogs

Stina Dahlgren, Martine Lund Ziener & Frode Lingaas
Symmetrical onychomadesis causes periodic loss of claws in otherwise healthy dogs. Genome-wide association analysis in 225 Gordon Setters identified a single region associated with symmetrical onychomadesis on chromosome 12 (spanning about 3.3 mb). A meta-analysis including also English Setters indicated that this genomic region predisposes for symmetrical onychomadesis in English Setters as well. The associated region spans most of the major histocompatibility complex and nearly 1 Mb downstream. Like many other autoimmune diseases, associations of...

Data from: Evolution of the immune system influences speciation rates in teleost fishes

Martin Malmstrøm, Michael Matschiner, Ole K. Tørresen, Bastiaan Star, Lars G. Snipen, Thomas F. Hansen, Helle T. Baalsrud, Alexander J. Nederbragt, Reinhold Hanel, Walter Salzburger, Nils C. Stenseth, Kjetill S. Jakobsen & Sissel Jentoft
Teleost fishes constitute the most species-rich vertebrate clade and exhibit extensive genetic and phenotypic variation, including diverse immune defense strategies. The genomic basis of a particularly aberrant strategy is exemplified by Atlantic cod, in which a loss of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II functionality coincides with a marked expansion of MHC I genes. Through low-coverage genome sequencing (9–39×), assembly and comparative analyses for 66 teleost species, we show here that MHC II is missing in...

Data from: Across population genomic prediction scenarios in which Bayesian variable selection outperforms GBLUP

Sanne Van Den Berg, Mario P. L. Calus, Theo H. E. Meuwissen & Yvonne C. J. Wientjes
Background: The use of information across populations is an attractive approach to increase the accuracy of genomic prediction for numerically small populations. However, accuracies of across population genomic prediction, in which reference and selection individuals are from different populations, are currently disappointing. It has been shown for within population genomic prediction that Bayesian variable selection models outperform GBLUP models when the number of QTL underlying the trait is low. Therefore, our objective was to identify...

Data from: Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals a genetic basis for sea-age variation in a wild population of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

Susan E. Johnston, Panu Orell, Victoria L. Pritchard, Matthew P. Kent, Sigbjørn Lien, Eero Niemelä, Jaakko Erkinaro, Craig Primmer & Craig R. Primmer
Delaying sexual maturation can lead to larger body size and higher reproductive success, but carries an increased risk of death before reproducing. Classical life history theory predicts that trade-offs between reproductive success and survival should lead to the evolution of an optimal strategy in a given population. However, variation in mating strategies generally persists, and in general, there remains a poor understanding of genetic and physiological mechanisms underlying this variation. One extreme case of this...

Data from: Ancient hybridizations among the ancestral genomes of bread wheat

Thomas Marcussen, Simen R. Sandve, Lise Heier, Manuel Spannagl, Matthias Pfeifer, The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, Kjetill S. Jakobsen, Brande B. H. Wulff, Burkhard Steuernagel, Klaus F. X. Mayer & Odd-Arne Olsen
The allohexaploid bread wheat genome consists of three closely related subgenomes (A, B, and D), but a clear understanding of their phylogenetic history has been lacking. We used genome assemblies of bread wheat and five diploid relatives to analyze genome-wide samples of gene trees, as well as to estimate evolutionary relatedness and divergence times. We show that the A and B genomes diverged from a common ancestor ~7 million years ago and that these genomes...

Data from: Comparative analyses of QTLs influencing obesity and metabolic phenotypes in pigs and humans

Sameer D. Pant, Peter Karlskov-Mortensen, Mette J. Jacobsen, Susanna Cirera, Lisette J. A. Kogelman, Camilla S. Bruun, Thomas Mark, Claus B. Jørgensen, Niels Grarup, Emil V. R. Appel, Ehm A. A. Galjatovic, Torben Hansen, Oluf B. Pedersen, Maryse Guerin, Thierry Huby, Philippe Lesnik, Theo H. E. Meuwissen, Haja N. Kadarmideen, Merete Fredholm & Oluf Pedersen
The pig is a well-known animal model used to investigate genetic and mechanistic aspects of human disease biology. They are particularly useful in the context of obesity and metabolic diseases because other widely used models (e.g. mice) do not completely recapitulate key pathophysiological features associated with these diseases in humans. Therefore, we established a F2 pig resource population (n = 564) designed to elucidate the genetics underlying obesity and metabolic phenotypes. Segregation of obesity traits...

Data from: Population structure, genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in perennial ryegrass populations divergently selected for freezing tolerance

Mallikarjuna Rao Kovi, Siri Fjellheim, Simen R. Sandve, Arild Larsen, Heidi Rudi, Torben Asp, Matthew Peter Kent & Odd Arne Rognli
Low temperature is one of the abiotic stresses seriously affecting the growth of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. Understanding the genetic control of freezing tolerance would aid in the development of cultivars of perennial ryegrass with improved adaptation to frost. A total number of 80 individuals (24 of High frost [HF]; 29 of Low frost [LF] and 27 of Unselected [US]) from the second generation of the two divergently selected populations and an unselected control...

Data from: Contrasting the roles of section length and instream habitat enhancement for river restoration success: a field study on 20 European restoration projects

Daniel Hering, Jukka Aroviita, Annette Baattrup-Pedersen, Karel Brabec, Tom Buijse, Frauke Ecke, Nikolai Friberg, Marek Gielczewski, Kathrin Januschke, Jan Köhler, Benjamin Kupilas, Armin W. Lorenz, Susanne Muhar, Amael Paillex, Michaela Poppe, Torsten Schmidt, Stefan Schmutz, Jan Vermaat, Piet F. M. Verdonschot, Ralf C. M. Verdonschot, Jochem Kail & Christian Wolter
1. Restoration of river hydromorphology often has limited detected effects on river biota. One frequently discussed reason is that the restored river length is insufficient to allow populations to develop and give the room for geomorphologic processes to occur. 2. We investigated ten pairs of restored river sections of which one was a large project involving a long, intensively restored river section and one represented a smaller restoration effort. The restoration effect was quantified by...

Data from: Using network analysis to study behavioural phenotypes: an example using domestic dogs

Conor Goold, Judit Vas, Christine Olsen & Ruth C. Newberry
Phenotypic integration describes the complex interrelationships between organismal traits, traditionally focusing on morphology. Recently, research has sought to represent behavioural phenotypes as composed of quasi-independent latent traits. Concurrently, psychologists have opposed latent variable interpretations of human behaviour, proposing instead a network perspective envisaging interrelationships between behaviours as emerging from causal dependencies. Network analysis could also be applied to understand integrated behavioural phenotypes in animals. Here, we assimilate this cross-disciplinary progression of ideas by demonstrating the...

Data from: Monitoring of plant-environment interactions by high throughput FTIR spectroscopy of pollen

Murat Bağcıoğlu, Achim Kohler, Stephan Seifert, Janina Kneipp & Boris Zimmermann
Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy enables chemical analysis of pollen samples for plant phenotyping to study plant–environment interactions, such as influence of climate change or pathogens. However, current approach, such as microspectroscopy and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy, does not allow for high-throughput protocols. This study at hand suggests a new spectroscopic method for high-throughput characterization of pollen. Samples were measured as thin films of pollen fragments using a Bruker FTIR spectrometer with a high-throughput eXTension...

Data from: Berry production drives bottom-up effects on body mass and reproductive success in an omnivore

Anne G. Hertel, Richard Bischof, Ola Langvall, Atle Mysterud, Jonas Kindberg, Jon E. Swenson, Andreas Zedrosser & Ola Langval
Obligate herbivores dominate studies of the effects of climate change on mammals, however there is limited empirical evidence for how changes in the abundance or quality of plant food affect mammalian omnivores. Omnivores can exploit a range of different food resources over the course of a year, but they often rely on seasonally restricted highly nutritious fruiting bodies during critical life stages. Brown bears Ursus arctos in Sweden are dependent on berries for fattening before...

Data from: A high-throughput FTIR spectroscopy approach to assess adaptive variation in the chemical composition of pollen

Boris Zimmermann, Murat Bağcıoğlu, Valeria Tafinstseva, Achim Kohler, Mikael Ohlson & Siri Fjellheim
The two factors defining male reproductive success in plants are pollen quantity and quality, but our knowledge about the importance of pollen quality is limited due to methodological constraints. Pollen quality in terms of chemical composition may be either genetically fixed for high performance independent of environmental conditions, or it may be plastic to maximize reproductive output under different environmental conditions. In this study, we validated a new approach for studying the role of chemical...

Data from: Population genetic analysis of a global collection of Fragaria vesca using microsatellite markers

Hrannar Smári Hilmarsson, Timo Hytönen, Sachiko Isobe, Magnus Göransson, Tuomas Toivainen & Jón Hallsteinn Hallsson
The woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, holds great promise as a model organism. It not only represents the important Rosaceae family that includes economically important species such as apples, pears, peaches and roses, but it also complements the well-known model organism Arabidopsis thaliana in key areas such as perennial life cycle and the development of fleshy fruit. Analysis of wild populations of A. thaliana has shed light on several important developmental pathways controlling, for example, flowering...

Data from: Parallel and nonparallel genome-wide divergence among replicate population pairs of freshwater and anadromous Atlantic salmon

Charles Perrier, Vincent Bourret, Matthew P. Kent & Louis Bernatchez
Little is known about the genetic basis differentiating resident and anadromous forms found in many salmonid species. Using a medium-density SNP array, we documented genomic diversity and divergence at 2336 genetically mapped loci among three pairs of North American anadromous and freshwater Atlantic salmon populations. Our results show that across the genome, freshwater populations have lower diversity and a smaller proportion of private polymorphism relative to anadromous populations. Moreover, differentiation was more pronounced among freshwater...

Data from: Genomic signatures of parasite-driven natural selection in north European Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

Ksenia J. Zueva, Jaakko Lumme, Alexei E Veselov, Matthew P. Kent & Craig R. Primmer
Understanding the genomic basis of host-parasite adaptation is important for predicting the long-term viability of species and developing successful management practices. However, in wild populations, identifying specific signatures of parasite-driven selection often presents a challenge, as it is difficult to unravel the molecular signatures of selection driven by different, but correlated, environmental factors. Furthermore, separating parasite-mediated selection from similar signatures due to genetic drift and population history can also be difficult. Populations of Atlantic salmon...

Data from: Circadian rhythmicity persists through the Polar night and midnight sun in Svalbard reindeer

Walter Arnold, Thomas Ruf, Leif Egil Loe, R. Justin Irvine, Erik Ropstad, Vebjørn Veiberg & Steve D. Albon
Studies of locomotor activity in Svalbard reindeer reported the temporary absence of diel rhythms under Arctic photic conditions. However, using Lomb-Scargle periodogram analyses with high statistical power we found diel or circadian rhythmicity throughout the entire year in measures of behaviour, temperature in the rumen and heart rate in free-living Svalbard reindeer. Significant diel rhythmicity was only lacking during some of the 15-day intervals analysed in the less frequently measured heart rate. During Polar Night...

Data from: A local evaluation of the individual state-space to scale up Bayesian spatial capture recapture

Cyril Milleret, Pierre Dupont, Christophe Bonenfant, Henrik Brøseth, Øystein Flagstad, Chris Sutherland & Richard Bischof
1. Spatial capture-recapture models (SCR) are used to estimate animal density and to investigate a range of problems in spatial ecology that cannot be addressed with traditional non-spatial methods. Bayesian approaches in particular offer tremendous flexibility for SCR modelling. Increasingly, SCR data are being collected over very large spatial extents making analysis computational intensive, sometimes prohibitively so. 2. To mitigate the computational burden of large-scale SCR models, we developed an improved formulation of the Bayesian...

Data from: Anthrax outbreaks in the humans-livestock and wildlife interface areas of northern Tanzania: a retrospective review 2006 - 2016

Elibariki Reuben Mwakapeje, Sol Hoegset, Robert Fyumagwa, Hezron E Nonga, Robinson Mdegela & Eystein Skjerve
BACKGROUND: Anthrax outbreaks in Tanzania have been reported from the human, livestock and wildlife sectors over several years, and is among the notifiable diseases. Despite frequent anthrax outbreaks, there is no comprehensive dataset indicating the magnitude and distribution of the disease in susceptible species. This study is a retrospective review of anthrax outbreaks from the human, livestock, and wildlife surveillance systems from 2006 to 2016. The objectives were to identify hotspot districts, describe anthrax epidemiology...

Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests

Wannes Hubau, Simon Lewis, Oliver Phillips, Kofi Kofi Affum-Baffoe, Hans Hans Beeckman, Aida Cuni-Sanchez, Corneille Ewango, Sophie Fauset, Douglas Sheil, Bonaventure Sonké, Martin Sullivan, Terry Sunderland, Sean Thomas, Katharine Abernethy, Stephen Adu-Bredu, Christian Amani, Timothy Baker, Lindsay Banin, Fidèle Baya, Serge Begne, Amy Bennett, Fabrice Benedet, Robert Bitariho & Yannick Bocko
Data and R-code from Hubau W et al. 2020. 'Asynchronous Saturation of the Carbon Sink in African and Amazonian tropical forests'. Nature 579, 80-87. 2020. DOI: 10.1038/s41586-020-2035-0. ABSTRACT: Structurally intact tropical forests sequestered ~50% of global terrestrial carbon uptake over the 1990s and early 2000s, offsetting ~15% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions1-3. Climate-driven vegetation models typically predict that this tropical forest ‘carbon sink’ will continue for decades4,5. However, recent inventories of intact Amazonian forests show declining...

Data from: Neighborhood bully: no difference in territorial response towards neighbors or strangers in marmots

Mariona Ferrandiz-Rovira, Timothée Zidat, Pierre Dupont, Vérane Berger, Célia Rézouki & Aurélie Cohas
Territorial animals are expected to adjust their response to intruders according to the perceived threat-level. One of the factors that drives threat-level is the identity of the intruder. The dear enemy phenomenon theory postulates that individuals should respond with lower intensity to neighbors, already possessing a territory, than to strangers that may fight to evict them. In social species, the hierarchical status of the intruder might also mediate this response. Such behavioral adjustments presuppose a...

Data from: The standard metabolic rate of a land snail (Cepaea hortensis) is a repeatable trait and influences winter survival

Claus Bech, Maren Trones Christiansen, Pernille Kvernland, Randi Marie Nygård, Eline Rypdal, Sara Kjeldsø Sneltorp, Liv Monica Trondrud & Øyvind Gjønnes Tvedten
Phenotypic selection on physiological parameters is an underrepresented topic in studies of evolutionary biology. There is especially a lack of studies involving invertebrate organisms. We studied the repeatability of the standard metabolic rate (SMR) and the effect of individual variation in SMR on the subsequent winter survival in a terrestrial shell-bearing mollusc, the white-lipped snail (Cepaea hortensis) in mid-Norway. SMR was measured twice during the autumn and – after an experimental overwintering at controlled conditions...

European soil seed bank communities across a climate and land-cover gradient

Jan Plue, Hans Van Calster, Inger Auestad, Sofia Basto, Reneé M. Bekker, Hans Henrik Bruun, Richard Chevalier, Guillaume Decocq, Ulf Grandin, Martin Hermy, Hans Jacquemyn, Anna Jakobsson, Rein Kalamees, Rob H. Marrs, Bryndis Marteinsdóttir, Per Milberg, Robin J. Pakeman, Gareth Phoenix, Ken Thompson, Vigdis Vandvik, Markus Wagner, Sara A.O. Cousins, Ove Eriksson, Jamshid Ghorbani, Małgorzata Jankowska-Błaszczuk … & Alistair G. Auffret
This is the data set used for the publication Buffering effects of soil seed banks on plant community composition in response to land use and climate, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. Aim. Climate and land use are key determinants of biodiversity, with past and ongoing changes posing serious threats to global ecosystems. Unlike most other organism groups, plant species can possess dormant life-history stages such as soil seed banks, which may help...

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