22 Works

Data from: Little impact of over-winter parasitism on a free-ranging ungulate in the high Arctic

Anja Morven Carlsson, Steve D. Albon, Stephen J. Coulson, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Ken Wilson, Leif Egil Loe, Vebjørn Veiberg, Robert Justin Irvine & Kenneth Wilson
1.Macroparasites have a central place in wildlife ecology because they have the potential to regulate host populations through effects on reproduction and/or survival. However, there remains a paucity of studies that have demonstrated the regulatory role of these parasites in free-ranging animals. 2.Previous work on Svalbard reindeer demonstrated that the experimental removal of the parasitic gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia gruehneri transmitted in summer, improved reindeer fecundity, and that the species was capable of mediating a density-dependent...

Data from: Ancient chromosomal rearrangement associated with local adaptation of a post-glacially colonized population of Atlantic Cod in the northwest Atlantic

Marion Sinclair-Waters, Ian R. Bradbury, Corey J. Morris, Sigbjorn Lien, Matthew P. Kent & Paul Bentzen
Intraspecific diversity is central to the management and conservation of exploited species, yet knowledge of how this diversity is distributed and maintained in the genome of many marine species is lacking. Recent advances in genomic analyses allow for genome-wide surveys of intraspecific diversity and offer new opportunities for exploring genomic patterns of divergence. Here, we analyzed genome-wide polymorphisms to measure genetic differentiation between an offshore migratory and a non-migratory population and to define conservation units...

Data from: Berry production drives bottom-up effects on body mass and reproductive success in an omnivore

Anne G. Hertel, Richard Bischof, Ola Langvall, Atle Mysterud, Jonas Kindberg, Jon E. Swenson, Andreas Zedrosser & Ola Langval
Obligate herbivores dominate studies of the effects of climate change on mammals, however there is limited empirical evidence for how changes in the abundance or quality of plant food affect mammalian omnivores. Omnivores can exploit a range of different food resources over the course of a year, but they often rely on seasonally restricted highly nutritious fruiting bodies during critical life stages. Brown bears Ursus arctos in Sweden are dependent on berries for fattening before...

Data from: Parallel and nonparallel genome-wide divergence among replicate population pairs of freshwater and anadromous Atlantic salmon

Charles Perrier, Vincent Bourret, Matthew P. Kent & Louis Bernatchez
Little is known about the genetic basis differentiating resident and anadromous forms found in many salmonid species. Using a medium-density SNP array, we documented genomic diversity and divergence at 2336 genetically mapped loci among three pairs of North American anadromous and freshwater Atlantic salmon populations. Our results show that across the genome, freshwater populations have lower diversity and a smaller proportion of private polymorphism relative to anadromous populations. Moreover, differentiation was more pronounced among freshwater...

Data from: A high-throughput FTIR spectroscopy approach to assess adaptive variation in the chemical composition of pollen

Boris Zimmermann, Murat Bağcıoğlu, Valeria Tafinstseva, Achim Kohler, Mikael Ohlson & Siri Fjellheim
The two factors defining male reproductive success in plants are pollen quantity and quality, but our knowledge about the importance of pollen quality is limited due to methodological constraints. Pollen quality in terms of chemical composition may be either genetically fixed for high performance independent of environmental conditions, or it may be plastic to maximize reproductive output under different environmental conditions. In this study, we validated a new approach for studying the role of chemical...

Data from: Population genetic analysis of a global collection of Fragaria vesca using microsatellite markers

Hrannar Smári Hilmarsson, Timo Hytönen, Sachiko Isobe, Magnus Göransson, Tuomas Toivainen & Jón Hallsteinn Hallsson
The woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, holds great promise as a model organism. It not only represents the important Rosaceae family that includes economically important species such as apples, pears, peaches and roses, but it also complements the well-known model organism Arabidopsis thaliana in key areas such as perennial life cycle and the development of fleshy fruit. Analysis of wild populations of A. thaliana has shed light on several important developmental pathways controlling, for example, flowering...

Data from: Wood-inhabiting insects can function as targeted vectors for decomposer fungi

Rannveig Margrete Jacobsen, Håvard Kauserud, Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson, Marit Markussen Bjorbækmo & Tone Birkemoe
Most wood-inhabiting fungi are assumed to be dispersed primarily by wind, with the exception of a few species involved in mutualistic relationships with insects. In this study we tested whether several species of wood-inhabiting insects can function as dispersal vectors for non-mutualistic fungi, which would indicate that wood-inhabiting fungi can benefit from targeted animal-mediated dispersal. We sampled wood-inhabiting beetles (Coleoptera) from freshly felled wood experimentally added to forests and used DNA metabarcoding to investigate the...

Data from: Biochar from \"Kon Tiki\" flame curtain and other kilns: effects of nutrient enrichment and kiln type on crop yield and soil chemistry

Naba Raj Pandit, Jan Mulder, Sarah Elisabeth Hale, Hans Peter Schmidt & Gerard Cornelissen
Biochar application to soils has been investigated as a means of improving soil fertility and mitigating climate change through soil carbon sequestration. In the present work, the invasive shrub "Eupatorium adenophorum" was utilized as a sustainable feedstock for making biochar under different pyrolysis conditions in Nepal. Biochar was produced using several different types of kilns; four sub types of flame curtain kilns (deep-cone metal kiln, steel shielded soil pit, conical soil pit and steel small...

Data from: Sex-specific genetic analysis indicates low correlation between demographic and genetic connectivity in the Scandinavian brown bear (Ursus arctos)

Julia Schregel, Alexander Kopatz, Hans Geir Eiken, Jon E. Swenson & Snorre B. Hagen
Species viability is strongly connected to the degree of gene flow within and among populations. Such genetic population connectivity may closely track demographic population connectivity or, alternatively, the rate of gene flow may change relative to the rate of dispersal. In this study, we have explored the relationship between genetic and demographic population connectivity using the Scandinavian brown bear as model species, due to its pronounced male dispersal and female philopatry. Our expectation, based on...

Data from: Direct and indirect effects of early-life environment on lifetime fitness of bighorn ewes

Gabriel Pigeon & Fanie Pelletier
Cohort effects, when a common environment affects long-term performance, can have a major impact on population dynamics. Very few studies of wild animals have obtained the necessary data to study the mechanisms leading to cohort effects. We exploited 42 years of individual-based data on bighorn sheep to test for causal links between birth density, body mass, age at first reproduction, longevity, and lifetime reproductive success using path analysis. Specifically, we investigated whether the effect of...

Data from: Freezer on, lights off! Environmental effects on activity rhythms of fish in the Arctic

Kate L. Hawley, Carolyn M. Rosten, Thrond O. Haugen, Guttorm Christensen & Martyn C. Lucas
Polar regions are characterized by acute seasonal changes in the environment, with organisms inhabiting these regions lacking diel photoperiodic information for parts of the year. We present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution analysis of diel and seasonal activity of free-living fishes in polar waters (74°N), subject to extreme variation in photoperiod, temperature and food availability. Using biotelemetry, we tracked two sympatric ecomorphs of lake-dwelling Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus n = 23) over an annual...

Data from: Competition between apex predators? Brown bears decrease wolf kill rate on two continents

Aimee Tallian, Andres Ordiz, Matthew C. Metz, Cyril Milleret, Camilla Wikenros, Douglas W. Smith, Daniel R. Stahler, Jonas Kindberg, Daniel R. MacNulty, Petter Wabakken, Jon E. Swenson & Håkan Sand
Trophic interactions are a fundamental topic in ecology, but we know little about how competition between apex predators affects predation, the mechanism driving top-down forcing in ecosystems. We used long-term datasets from Scandinavia (Europe) and Yellowstone National Park (North America) to evaluate how grey wolf (Canis lupus) kill rate was affected by a sympatric apex predator, the brown bear (Ursus arctos). We used kill interval (i.e. the number of days between consecutive ungulate kills) as...

Data from: Fungal communities influence decomposition rates of plant litter from two dominant trees species

Johan Asplund, Håvard Kauserud, Stef Bokhorst, Marit H. Lie, Mikael Ohlson & Line Nybakken
The home-field advantage hypothesis (HFA) predicts that plant litter decomposes faster than expected underneath the plant from which it originates. We tested this hypothesis in a decomposition experiment where litters were incubated reciprocally in neighbouring European beech and Norway spruce forests. We analysed fungal communities in the litter through DNA metabarcoding and evaluated the effect of mesofauna (mites and springtails) on litter mass loss by using different litter-bag mesh sizes. Accounting for general differences in...

Data from: Sociodemographic factors modulate the spatial response of brown bears to vacancies created by hunting

Shane C. Frank, Martin Leclerc, Fanie Pelletier, Frank Rosell, Jon E. Swenson, Richard Bischof, Jonas Kindberg, Hans Geir Eiken, Snorre B. Hagen, Andreas Zedrosser & Jon. E. Swenson
1.There is a growing recognition of the importance of indirect effects from hunting on wildlife populations, e.g., social and behavioral changes due to harvest, which occur after the initial offtake. Nonetheless, little is known about how the removal of members of a population influences the spatial configuration of the survivors. 2.We studied how surviving brown bears (Ursus arctos) used former home ranges that had belonged to casualties of the annual bear hunting season in southcentral...

Data from: Spatial mismatch between management units and movement ecology of a partially migratory ungulate

Erling L. Meisingset, Leif Egil Loe, Øystein Brekkum, Richard Bischof, Inger Maren Rivrud, Unni Støbet Lande, Barbara Zimmermann, Vebjørn Veiberg & Atle Mysterud
1. Population-level management is difficult to achieve if wildlife routinely crosses administrative boundaries, as is particularly frequent for migratory populations. However, the degree of mismatch between management units and scales at which ecological processes operate has rarely been quantified. Such insight is vital for delimiting functional population units of partially migratory species common in northern forest ecosystems. 2. We combined an extensive dataset of 412 GPS-marked red deer (Cervus elaphus) across Norway with information on...

Data from: Strong positive effects of termites on savanna bird abundance and diversity are amplified by large herbivore exclusion

Stein R. Moe, Katrine Eldegard, Ole Tobias Rannestad, Paul Okullo, Ommund Lindtjørn, Ole Gunnar Støen & Svein Dale
Vast areas of the African savanna landscapes are characterized by tree-covered Macrotermes termite mounds embedded within a relatively open savanna matrix. In concert with termites, large herbivores are important determinants of savanna woody vegetation cover. The relative cover of woody species has considerable effects on savanna function. Despite the potentially important ecological relationships between termite mounds, woody plants, large herbivores, and birds, these associations have previously received surprisingly little attention. We experimentally studied the effects...

Data from: Climate change and bird reproduction: warmer springs benefit breeding success in boreal forest grouse

Per Wegge & Jorund Rolstad
Global warming is predicted to adversely affect reproduction of birds, especially in northern latitudes. A recent study in Finland inferred that declining populations of black grouse Tetrao tetrix could be attributed to advancement of the time of mating and chicks hatching too early – a support of the mismatch hypothesis. Here, we examine the breeding success of sympatric capercaillie T. urogallus and black grouse over a 38-year period in southeast Norway. Breeding season temperatures increased,...

Data from: A case for considering individual variation in diel activity patterns

Anne G. Hertel, Jon E. Swenson & Richard Bischof
There is a growing recognition of the role of individual variation in patterns emerging at higher levels of biological organization. Despite the importance of the temporal configuration of ecological processes and patterns, intraspecific individual variation in diel activity patterns is almost never accounted for in behavioral studies at the population level. We used individual-based monitoring data from 98 GPS-collared brown bears in Scandinavia to estimate diel activity patterns before the fall hunting season. We extracted...

Data from: Widespread increases in iron concentration in European and North American freshwaters

Caroline Björnerås, Gesa A. Weyhenmeyer, Chris D. Evans, Mark O. Gessner, Hans-Peter Grossart, Külli Kangur, Ilga Kokorite, Pirkko Kortelainen, Hjalmar Laudon, Jouni Lehoranta, Noah Lottig, Don T. Monteith, Peter Nõges, Tiina Nõges, Filip Oulehle, Gunnhild Riise, James A. Rusak, Antti Räike, Janis Sire, Shannon Sterling & Emma Kritzberg
Recent reports of increasing iron (Fe) concentrations in freshwaters are of concern, given the fundamental role of Fe in biogeochemical processes. Still, little is known about the frequency and geographical distribution of Fe trends, or about the underlying drivers. We analyzed temporal trends of Fe concentrations across 340 water bodies distributed over 10 countries in northern Europe and North America in order to gain a clearer understanding of where, to what extent, and why Fe...

Data from: Life-stage associated remodeling of lipid metabolism regulation in Atlantic salmon

Gareth Gillard, Thomas N. Harvey, Arne Gjuvsland, Yang Jin, Magny Thomassen, Sigbjorn Lien, Michael Leaver, Jacob S. Torgersen, Torgeir R. Hvidsten, Jon Olav Vik, Simen Sandve & Simen R. Sandve
Atlantic salmon migrates from rivers to sea to feed, grow and develop gonads before returning to spawn in freshwater. The transition to marine habitats is associated with dramatic changes in the environment, including water salinity, exposure to pathogens, and shift in dietary lipid availability. Many anticipatory changes in physiology occur before migration to sea, but little is known about the molecular nature of these changes. Here we use a long term feeding experiment to study...

Data from: Geographically widespread honeybee-gut symbiont subgroups show locally distinct antibiotic-resistant patterns

Jane Ludvigsen, Davide Porcellato, Trine M. L'Abée-Lund, Gro V. Amdam & Knut Rudi
How long-term antibiotic treatment affects host bacterial associations is still largely unknown. The honeybee-gut microbiota has a simple composition, so we used this gut community to investigate how long-term antibiotic treatment affects host-associated microbiota. We investigated the phylogenetic relatedness, genomic content (GC percentage, genome size, number of genes, and CRISPR), and antibiotic-resistant genes for strains from two abundant members of the honeybee core gut microbiota (Gilliamella apicola and Snodgrassella alvi). Domesticated honeybees are subjected to...

Data from: Definition and estimation of vital rates from repeated censuses: choices, comparisons and bias corrections focusing on trees

Takashi S. Kohyama, Tetsuo I. Kohyama, Douglas Sheil & Takashi Kohyama
1.Mortality and recruitment rates are fundamental measures of population dynamics. Ecologists and others have defined and estimated these vital rates in various ways. We review these alternatives focusing on tree population census data in fixed area plots, though many aspects have wider application when similar data characteristics and assumptions apply: our goal is to guide choices and facilitate comparisons. 2.We divide our estimates into ‘instantaneous’ and ‘annual’ rates, corresponding to continuous- or discrete-time dynamics respectively....

Registration Year

  • 2017
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    22
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    6
  • University of Oslo
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    4
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • Utah State University
    1