18 Works

Macroclimate drives growth of hair lichens in boreal forest canopies

Nathan Phinney, Yngvar Gauslaa, Kristin Palmqvist & Per-Anders Esseen
1. Epiphytic lichens are important biodiversity components of forest canopies worldwide, significantly contributing to ecosystem function. The relative growth rate (RGR), a measure of fitness, drives population dynamics and shapes lichens’ large-scale distributions. In a climate change scenario, we need to know how external (macro- and microclimate, and nitrogen deposition), and internal factors (cortical pigments, chlorophyll and specimen size) affect RGR in these ecologically important canopy organisms. 2. We used dominant pendulous (hair) lichens widely...

Data from: Ecological impact assessments of alien species in Norway

Hanno Sandvik, Olga Hilmo, Snorre Henriksen, Reidar Elven, Per Arvid Åsen, Hanne Hegre, Oddvar Pedersen, Per Anker Pedersen, Heidi Solstad, Vigdis Vandvik, Kristine B. Westergaard, Frode Ødegaard, Sandra Åström, Hallvard Elven, Anders Endrestøl, Øivind Gammelmo, Bjørn Arild Hatteland, Halvor Solheim, Björn Nordén, Leif Sundheim, Venche Talgø, Tone Falkenhaug, Bjørn Gulliksen, Anders Jelmert, Eivind Oug … & Lisbeth Gederaas
Due to globalisation, trade and transport, the spread of alien species is increasing dramatically. Some alien species become ecologically harmful by threatening native biota. This can lead to irreversible changes in local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and, ultimately, to biotic homogenisation. We risk-assessed all alien plants, animals, fungi and algae, within certain delimitations, that are known to reproduce in Norway. Mainland Norway and the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard plus Jan Mayen were treated as separate...

Data from: Sampling beetle communities: trap design interacts with weather and species traits to bias capture rates

Ryan Burner, Tone Birkemoe, Siri Lie Olsen & Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson
Globally, many insect populations are declining, prompting calls for action. Yet these findings have also prompted discussion about sampling methods and interpretation of long-term datasets. As insect monitoring and research efforts increase, it is critical to quantify the effectiveness of sampling methods. This is especially true if sampling biases of different methods covary with climate, which is also changing over time. We assess the effectiveness of two types of flight intercept traps commonly used for...

Data from: Consistent scaling of inbreeding depression in space and time in a house sparrow metapopulation

Alina K. Niskanen, Anna M. Billing, Håkon Holand, Ingerid J. Hagen, Yimen G. Araya-Ajoy, Arild Husby, Bernt Rønning, Ane Marlene Myhre, Peter Sjolte Ranke, Thomas Kvalnes, Henrik Pärn, Thor Harald Ringsby, Sigbjørn Lien, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Stefanie Muff & Henrik Jensen
Inbreeding may increase the extinction risk of small populations. Yet, studies using modern genomic tools to investigate inbreeding depression in nature have been limited to single populations, and little is known about the dynamics of inbreeding depression in subdivided populations over time. Natural populations often experience different environmental conditions and differ in demographic history and genetic composition; characteristics that can affect the severity of inbreeding depression. We utilised extensive long-term data on more than 3100...

Data from: Environmental conditions alter successional trajectories on an ephemeral resource: a field experiment with beetles in dead wood

Ole Petter Laksforsmo Vindstad, Tone Birkemoe, Rolf Anker Ims & Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson
Successional processes can be observed for many organisms and resources, but most studies of succession have focused on plants. A general framework has been proposed, advocating that successional patterns in species turnover are predominantly driven by competition, dispersal or abiotic limitation, and that the patterning of species accumulation over time gives clues to which process is most influential in a given system. We applied this framework to succession in communities of wood-living beetles, utilizing ephemeral...

A genome-wide linkage map for the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) provides insights into the evolutionary history of the avian genome

Ingerid Hagen, Sigbjørn Lien, Anna Billing, Tore O. Elgvin, Cassandra Trier, Alina K. Niskanen, Maja Tarka, Jon Slate, Glenn-Peter Sætre & Henrik Jensen
The house sparrow is an important model species for studying physiological, ecological and evolutionary processes in wild populations. Here, we present a medium density, genome wide linkage map for house sparrow (Passer domesticus) that has aided the assembly of the house sparrow reference genome, and that will provide an important resource for ongoing mapping of genes controlling important traits in the ecology and evolution of this species. Using a custom house sparrow 10K iSelect Illumina...

Phytplanction Juruá River

Joao Vitor Campos-Silva & Carlos Peres
1. Tropical floodplains secure the protein supply of millions of people, but only sound management can ensure the long-term continuity of such ecosystem services. Overfishing is a widespread threat to multitrophic systems, but how it affects ecosystem functioning is poorly understood, particularly in tropical freshwater foodwebs. Models based on temperate lakes frequently assume that primary producers are mostly bottom-up controlled by nutrient and light limitations, with negligible effects of top-down forces. Yet this assumption remains...

Enhancing pollination is more effective than increased conventional agriculture inputs for improving watermelon yields

Thomas Sawe, Katrine Eldegard, Ørjan Totland, Samora Macrice & Anders Nielsen
Agricultural practices to improve yields in small-scale farms in Africa usually focus on improving growing conditions for the crops by applying fertilizers, irrigation and/or pesticides. This may however, have limited effect on yield if the availability of effective pollinators is too low. In this study, we established an experiment to test whether soil fertility, soil moisture and/or pollination was limiting watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) yields in Northern Tanzania. We subjected the experimental field to common farming...

Data from: Neighborhood bully: no difference in territorial response towards neighbors or strangers in marmots

Mariona Ferrandiz-Rovira, Timothée Zidat, Pierre Dupont, Vérane Berger, Célia Rézouki & Aurélie Cohas
Territorial animals are expected to adjust their response to intruders according to the perceived threat-level. One of the factors that drives threat-level is the identity of the intruder. The dear enemy phenomenon theory postulates that individuals should respond with lower intensity to neighbors, already possessing a territory, than to strangers that may fight to evict them. In social species, the hierarchical status of the intruder might also mediate this response. Such behavioral adjustments presuppose a...

Data from: The standard metabolic rate of a land snail (Cepaea hortensis) is a repeatable trait and influences winter survival

Claus Bech, Maren Trones Christiansen, Pernille Kvernland, Randi Marie Nygård, Eline Rypdal, Sara Kjeldsø Sneltorp, Liv Monica Trondrud & Øyvind Gjønnes Tvedten
Phenotypic selection on physiological parameters is an underrepresented topic in studies of evolutionary biology. There is especially a lack of studies involving invertebrate organisms. We studied the repeatability of the standard metabolic rate (SMR) and the effect of individual variation in SMR on the subsequent winter survival in a terrestrial shell-bearing mollusc, the white-lipped snail (Cepaea hortensis) in mid-Norway. SMR was measured twice during the autumn and – after an experimental overwintering at controlled conditions...

European soil seed bank communities across a climate and land-cover gradient

Jan Plue, Hans Van Calster, Inger Auestad, Sofia Basto, Reneé M. Bekker, Hans Henrik Bruun, Richard Chevalier, Guillaume Decocq, Ulf Grandin, Martin Hermy, Hans Jacquemyn, Anna Jakobsson, Rein Kalamees, Rob H. Marrs, Bryndis Marteinsdóttir, Per Milberg, Robin J. Pakeman, Gareth Phoenix, Ken Thompson, Vigdis Vandvik, Markus Wagner, Sara A.O. Cousins, Ove Eriksson, Jamshid Ghorbani, Małgorzata Jankowska-Błaszczuk … & Alistair G. Auffret
This is the data set used for the publication Buffering effects of soil seed banks on plant community composition in response to land use and climate, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. Aim. Climate and land use are key determinants of biodiversity, with past and ongoing changes posing serious threats to global ecosystems. Unlike most other organism groups, plant species can possess dormant life-history stages such as soil seed banks, which may help...

Data from: A method to generate multi-locus barcodes of pinned insect specimens using MiSeq

Trace Akankunda, Hien To, Carlos R Lopez, Remko Leijs & Katja Hogendoorn
For molecular insect identification, amplicon sequencing methods are recommended because they offer a cost effective approach for targeting small sets of informative genes from multiple samples. In this context, high-throughput multilocus amplicon sequencing has been achieved using the MiSeq Illumina sequencing platform. However, this approach generates short gene fragments of less than 500 bp, which then have to be overlapped using bioinformatics to achieve longer sequence lengths. This increases the risk of generating chimeric sequences...

Data from: Comparative transcriptomics reveals domestication-associated features of Atlantic salmon lipid metabolism

Yang Jin, Rolf Erik Olsen, Thomas Nelson Harvey, Mari-Ann Østensen, Keshuai Li, Nina Santi, Olav Vadstein, Atle Magnar Bones, Jon Olav Vik, Simen Rød Sandve & Yngvar Olsen
Domestication of animals imposes strong targeted selection for desired traits but can also result in unintended selection due to new domestic environments. Atlantic salmon was domesticated in the 1970s and has subsequently been selected for faster growth in systematic breeding programmes. More recently, salmon aquaculture has replaced fish oils (FO) with vegetable oils (VO) in feed, radically changing the levels of essential long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA). Our aim was to study the impact of...

Chemical variations in Quercus pollen as a tool for taxonomic identification: implications for long-term ecological and biogeographical research

Florian Muthreich, Boris Zimmermann, Carlos M. Vila-Viçosa, H. John. B. Birks & Alistair W.R. Seddon
Aim Fossil pollen is an important tool for understanding biogeographic patterns in the past, but the taxonomic resolution of the fossil-pollen record may be limited to genus or even family level. Chemical analysis of pollen grains has the potential to increase the taxonomic resolution of pollen, but present-day chemical variability is poorly understood. This study aims to investigate whether a phylogenetic signal is present in the chemical variations of Quercus L. pollen and to assess...

An empirical evaluation of camera trap study design: how many, how long, and when?

Roland Kays, Brian Arbogast, Megan Baker-Whatton, Chris Beirne, Hailey Boone, Mark Bowler, Santiago Burneo, Michael Cove, Ping Ding, Santiago Espinosa, André Gonçalves, Christopher Hansen, Patrick Jansen, Joseph Kolowski, Travis Knowles, Marcela Lima, Joshua Millspaugh, William McShea, Krishna Pacifici, Arielle Parsons, Brent Pease, Francesco Rovero, Fernanda Santos, Stephanie Schuttler, Douglas Sheil … & Wilson Spironello
1. Camera traps deployed in grids or stratified random designs are a well-established survey tool for wildlife but there has been little evaluation of study design parameters. 2. We used an empirical subsampling approach involving 2225 camera deployments run at 41 study areas around the world to evaluate three aspects of camera trap study design (number of sites, duration and season of sampling) and their influence on the estimation of three ecological metrics (species richness,...

Opposing fitness consequences of habitat use in a harvested moose population

Endre Grüner Ofstad, Endre Ofstad, Stine Markussen, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Erling Johan Solberg, Morten Heim, Hallvard Haanes, Knut Røed & Ivar Herfindal
1. Landscape changes are happening at an unprecedented pace, and together with high levels of wildlife harvesting humans have a large effect on wildlife populations. A thorough knowledge of their combined influence on individual fitness is important in order to understand factors affecting population dynamics. 2. The goal of the study was to assess the individual consistency in the use of risky habitat types, and how habitat use was related to fitness components and life-history...

Phylogeny of the Norwegian flora

Ida M. Mienna, James D. M. Speed, Mika Bendiksby, Andrew H. Thornhill, Brent D. Mishler & Michael D. Martin
Abstract: Aim: In this study, we explored spatial patterns of phylogenetic diversity and endemism in the flora of Norway and tested hypothesized post-glacial environmental drivers of phylogenetic diversity, including temperature, precipitation, edaphic factors, and time since glacial retreat. Location: Norway. Taxon: Vascular plants (Trachaeophyta). Methods: We produced a multi-locus Maximum Likelihood (ML) phylogeny using a combination of newly produced DNA sequences from herbarium specimens and sequences available from public repositories. We combined the phylogeny with...

Data from: Congruence, but no cascade - pelagic biodiversity across 3 trophic levels in Nordic lakes

Tom Andersen, Dag O. Hessen, Johnny Håll, Maryia Khomich, Marcia Kyle, Markus Lindholm, Serana Rasconi, Birger Skjelbred, Jan-Erik Thrane & Bjørn Walseng
Covariation in species richness and community structure across taxonomical groups (cross-taxon congruence) has practical consequences for the identification of biodiversity surrogates and proxies, as well as theoretical ramifications for understanding the mechanisms maintaining and sustaining biodiversity. We found there to exist a high cross-taxon congruence between phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish in 73 large Scandinavian lakes across a 750 km longitudinal transect. The fraction of the total diversity variation explained by local environment alone was small...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    18
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    6
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    6
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • University of Bergen
    3
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    2
  • Norwegian Institute for Water Research
    2
  • University of Oulu
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • Autonomous University of San Luis Potosí
    1