61 Works

Data for: Parasitoids indicate major climate-induced shifts in Arctic communities

Tuomas Kankaanpää, Eero Vesterinen, Bess Hardwick, Niels Martin Martin Schmidt, Tommi Andersson, Paul Eric Aspholm, Isabel Barrio, Niklas Beckers, Joël Bêty, Tone Birkemoe, Melissa DeSiervo, Katherine Drotos, Dorothee Ehrich, Olivier Gilg, Vladimir Gilg, Nils Hein, Toke Høye, Kristian Jakobsen, Camille Jodouin, Jesse Jorna, Mikhail Kozlov, Jean-Claude Kresse, Don-Jean Leandri-Breton, Nicolas Lecomte, Maia Olsen … & Tomas Roslin
Climatic impacts are especially pronounced in the Arctic, which as a region is warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe. Here, we investigate how mean climatic conditions and rates of climatic change impact parasitoid insect communities in 16 localities across the Arctic. We focus on parasitoids in a wide-spread habitat, Dryas heathlands, and describe parasitoid community composition in terms of larval host use (i.e. parasitoid use of herbivorous Lepidoptera versus pollinating Diptera)...

Data from: Model-based ordination for species with unequal niche widths

Bert Van Der Veen, Francis K.C. Hui, Knut A. Hovstad, Erik B. Solbu & Robert B. O'Hara
It is common practice for ecologists to examine species niches in the study of community composition. The response curve of a species in the fundamental niche is usually assumed to be quadratic. The center of a quadratic curve represents a species' optimal environmental conditions, and the width its ability to tolerate deviations from the optimum. Most multivariate methods assume species respond linearly to the environment of the niche, or with a quadratic curve that is...

Short-Tandem-Repeat (STR) marker set for Eurasian lynx for article: Genetic analysis indicates spatial-dependent patterns of sex-biased dispersal in Eurasian lynx in Finland

Annika Herrero, Cornelya Klutsch, Katja Holmala, Simo Maduna, Alexander Kopatz, Hans Geir Eiken & Snorre Hagen
Conservation and management of large carnivores requires knowledge of female and male dispersal. Such information is crucial to evaluate the population’s status and thus management actions. This knowledge is challenging to obtain, often incomplete and contradictory at times. The size of the target population and the methods applied can bias the results. Also, population history and biological or environmental influences can affect dispersal on different scales within a study area. We have genotyped Eurasian lynx...

Sea ice reduction drives genetic differentiation among Barents Sea polar bears

Simo Njabulo Maduna, Jon Aars, Ida Fløystad, Cornelya Klutsch, Eve Zeyl Fiskebeck, Øystein Wiig, Dorothee Ehrich, Magnus Andersen, Lutz Bachmann, Andrew Derocher, Tommi Nyman, Hans Geir Eiken & Snorre Hagen
Loss of Arctic sea ice due to climate change is predicted to reduce both genetic diversity and gene flow in ice-dependent species, with potential negative consequences for their long-term viability. Here, we tested for the population-genetic impacts of reduced sea ice cover on the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) sampled across two decades (1995–2016) from the Svalbard Archipelago, Norway, an area that is affected by rapid sea ice loss in the Arctic Barents Sea. We analysed...

MetaComNet: A random forest-based framework for making spatial prediction of plant-pollinator interactions

Markus Arne Kjær Sydenham, Zander Venter, Trond Reitan, Claus Rasmussen, Astrid Skrindo, Daniel Skoog, Kaj-Andreas Hanevik, Stein Joar Hegland, Yoko Dupont, Anders Nielsen, Joseph Chipperfield & Graciela Rusch
1. Predicting plant-pollinator interaction networks over space and time will improve our understanding of how environmental change is likely to impact the functioning of ecosystems. Here we propose a framework for producing spatially explicit predictions of the occurrence and number of pairwise plant-pollinator interactions and of the species richness, diversity, and abundance of pollinators visiting flowers. We call the framework ‘MetaComNet’ because it aims to link metacommunity dynamics to the assembly of ecological networks. 2....

Data from: Future suitability of habitat in a migratory ungulate under climate change

Inger Maren Rivrud, Erling L. Meisingset, Leif Egil Loe & Atle Mysterud
With climate change, the effect of global warming on snow cover is expected to cause range expansion and enhance habitat suitability for species at their northern distribution limits. However, how this depend on landscape topography and sex in size-dimorphic species remains uncertain, and is further complicated for migratory animals following climate-driven seasonal resource fluctuations across vast landscapes. Using 11 years of data from a partially migratory ungulate at their northern distribution ranges, the red deer...

Data from: Genetic changes caused by restocking and hydroelectric dams in demographically bottlenecked brown trout in a transnational subarctic riverine system

Cornelya F. C. Klutsch, Simo N. Maduna, Natalia Polikarpova, Kristin Forfang, Paul Eric Aspholm, Tommi Nyman, Hans Geir Eiken, Per-Arne Amundsen & Snorre B. Hagen
Habitat discontinuity, anthropogenic disturbance, and overharvesting have led to population fragmentation and declines worldwide. Preservation of remaining natural genetic diversity is crucial to avoid continued genetic erosion. Brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) is an ideal model species for studying anthropogenic influences on genetic integrity, as it has experienced significant genetic alterations throughout its natural distribution range due to habitat fragmentation, overexploitation, translocations, and stocking. The Pasvik River is a subarctic riverine system shared between Norway,...

Data and scripts for: Quantitative assessment of observed vs. predicted responses to selection

Christophe Pelabon, Elena Albertsen, Arnaud Le Rouzic, Cyril Firmat, Geir H. Bolstad, W. Scott Armbruster & Thomas Hansen
Although artificial-selection experiments seem well suited to testing our ability to predict evolution, the correspondence between predicted and observed responses is often ambiguous due to the lack of uncertainty estimates. We present equations for assessing prediction error in direct and indirect responses to selection that integrate uncertainty in genetic parameters used for prediction and sampling effects during selection. Using these, we analyzed a selection experiment on floral traits replicated in two taxa of the Dalechampia...

Data from: Wood modification by furfuryl alcohol caused delayed decomposition response in Rhodonia (Postia) placenta

Inger Skrede, Monica Hongrø Solbakken, Jaqueline Hess, Carl Gunnar Fossdal, Olav Hegnar & Gry Alfredsen
The aim of this study was to investigate differential expression profiles of the brown rot fungus Rhodonia placenta (previously Postia placenta) harvested at several time points when grown on radiata pine (Pinus radiata) and radiata pine with three different levels of modification by furfuryl alcohol, an environmentally benign commercial wood protection system. The entire gene expression pattern of a decay fungus is followed in untreated and modified wood from initial to advanced stages of decay....

Using semiochemicals to predict biotic resistance and facilitation of invading phytophagous insects

Rylee Isitt, Bjørn Økland, Paal Krokene, Jon Sweeney, Stephen Heard & Deepa Pureswaran
Invasive species are leading causes of biodiversity loss and economic damage. Allocating limited resources towards prevention and management of invasions requires risk assessments based on ecological knowledge for species of potential concern. Interactions of potentially invasive species with heterospecifics in a novel community will contribute to biotic resistance and facilitation experienced by the invader, and thus the likelihood of establishment. To experimentally predict heterospecific interactions, we conducted field experiments using synthetic aggregation-pheromone lures to measure...

Additional file 2 of Comparative analysis of the anthelmintic efficacy of European heather extracts on Teladorsagia circumcincta and Trichostrongylus colubriformis egg hatching and larval motility

Francesca Shepherd, Caroline Chylinski, Michael R. Hutchings, Joana Lima, Ross Davidson, Robert Kelly, Alastair Macrae, Juha-Pekka Salminen, Marica T. Engström, Veronika Maurer, Håvard Steinshamn, Susanne Fittje, Angela Morell Perez, Rocío Rosa García & Spiridoula Athanasiadou
Additional file 2: Table S1. Environmental conditions at sites of heather collection.

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Affiliations

  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
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  • University of Turku
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