9 Works

Data from: Curation: heat stress responses and population genetics of the kelp Laminaria digitata (Phaeophyceae) across latitudes reveal differentiation among North Atlantic populations

Louise Fouqueau, Daniel Liesner, Myriam Valero, Michael Roleda, Gareth Pearson, Kai Bischof, Klaus Valentin & Inka Bartsch
We aim to understand the thermal plasticity of a coastal foundation species across its latitudinal distribution by assessing physiological responses to high temperature stress in the kelp Laminaria digitata in combination with population genetic characteristics. We hypothesize that Arctic and cold-temperate populations are less heat resilient than warm-temperate populations. Using meristems of natural L. digitata populations from six locations ranging between Kongsfjorden, Spitsbergen (79°N), and Quiberon, France (47°N), we performed a common-garden heat stress experiment...

Highways associated with expansion of boreal scavengers into the alpine tundra of Fennoscandia

Lars Rød-Eriksen, Johanna Skrutvold, Ivar Herfindal, Henrik Jensen & Nina Elisabeth Eide
1) Habitat fragmentation may affect species distributions through, for example, altered resource availability and shifts in species interactions. Fragmentation by roads has had negative impacts on Fennoscandian alpine ecosystems, with reduction of habitats and connectivity for alpine species. Concurrently, infrastructure development cause influx of subsidies through roadkills and litter, which may facilitate expansion of boreal scavenging species, such as the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), which may intensify negative interactions with alpine species. Hence, understanding the...

Heat stress responses of the kelp Laminaria digitata (Phaeophyceae) across Northeast Atlantic populations: growth, biochemistry, chlorophyll fluorescence, pigments

Daniel Liesner, Louise Fouqueau, Myriam Valero, Michael Y. Roleda, Gareth A. Pearson, Kai Bischof, Klaus Valentin & Inka Bartsch
To understand the thermal plasticity of a coastal foundation species across its latitudinal distribution, we assess physiological responses to high temperature stress in the kelp Laminaria digitata in combination with population genetic characteristics and relate heat resilience to genetic features and phylogeography. We hypothesize that populations from Arctic and cold-temperate locations are less heat resilient than populations from warm distributional edges. Using meristems of natural L. digitata populations from six locations ranging between Kongsfjorden, Spitsbergen...

Interfering with neighbouring communities: allelopathy astray in the tundra delays seedling development

Kari Anne Bråthen, Anna Katharina Pilsbacher, Bente Lindgård, Rigmor Reiersen & Victoria Gonzalez
1. Altered species composition caused by environmental and climatic change can affect the transfer of plant residues among communities. Whereas transferred residues are typically considered a resource in recipient systems, residues of allelopathic species may instead cause interference. 2. Evergreen dwarf shrubs, specifically the allelopathic species Empetrum nigrum are increasing in abundance in response to a warming climate. Empetrum has small, evergreen leaves that can be transferred to other communities when withered and lost from...

Genotype data from: Restoration of transborder connectivity for Fennoscandian brown bears (Ursus arctos)

Alexander Kopatz, Kleven Oddmund, Kojola Ilpo, Aspi Jouni, Anita J. Norman, Göran Spong, Niclas Gyllenstrand, Love Dalén, Ida Fløystad, Snorre B. Hagen, Jonas Kindberg & Øystein Flagstad
Knowledge about the connectivity among natural populations is essential to identify management units for effective conservation actions. Conservation-minded management has led to the recovery of large carnivore populations in northern Europe, possibly restoring connectivity between the two separated, but expanding brown bear (Ursus arctos) populations on the Scandinavian peninsula to the west and Karelia, a part of the large Eurasian population, to the east. The degree of connectivity between these populations has been poorly understood,...

Data from: Translocation of an arctic seashore plant reveals signs of maladaptation to altered climatic conditions

Maria Hällfors, Susanna Lehvävirta, Tone Aandahl, Iida-Maria Lehtimäki, Lars Ola Nilsson, Anna-Liisa Ruotsalainen, Leif Schulman & Marko Hyvärinen
Ongoing anthropogenic climate change alters the local climatic conditions to which species may be adapted. Information on species’ climatic requirements and their intraspecific variation is necessary for predicting the effects of climate change on biodiversity. We used a climatic gradient to test whether populations of two allopatric varieties of an arctic seashore herb (Primula nutans ssp. finmarchica) show adaptation to their local climates and how a future warmer climate may affect them. Our experimental set-up...

Data from: Ecological impact assessments of alien species in Norway

Hanno Sandvik, Olga Hilmo, Snorre Henriksen, Reidar Elven, Per Arvid Åsen, Hanne Hegre, Oddvar Pedersen, Per Anker Pedersen, Heidi Solstad, Vigdis Vandvik, Kristine B. Westergaard, Frode Ødegaard, Sandra Åström, Hallvard Elven, Anders Endrestøl, Øivind Gammelmo, Bjørn Arild Hatteland, Halvor Solheim, Björn Nordén, Leif Sundheim, Venche Talgø, Tone Falkenhaug, Bjørn Gulliksen, Anders Jelmert, Eivind Oug … & Lisbeth Gederaas
Due to globalisation, trade and transport, the spread of alien species is increasing dramatically. Some alien species become ecologically harmful by threatening native biota. This can lead to irreversible changes in local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and, ultimately, to biotic homogenisation. We risk-assessed all alien plants, animals, fungi and algae, within certain delimitations, that are known to reproduce in Norway. Mainland Norway and the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard plus Jan Mayen were treated as separate...

Data from: Norway and Sweden Green Roof (GF) plant data

Joel Lönnqvist, Hans Martin Hanslin & Birgitte Gisvold Johannessen
Standard succulent vegetation mixes developed mostly in temperate climates are being increasingly used on green roofs in different climate zones with uncertain outcome regarding vegetation survival and cover. We investigated vegetation on green roofs at nine temperate, cold and/or wet locations in Norway and Sweden covering wide ranges of latitude, mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, frequencies of freeze-thaw cycles and longest annual dry period. The vegetation on the roofs were surveyed in two consecutive years,...

Using ecological context to interpret spatiotemporal variation in natural selection

Elena Albertsen, Elena Albertsen, Øystein Opedal, Geir Bolstad, Rocio Barrales, Thomas Hansen, Christophe Pelabon & W. Scott Armbruster
Spatiotemporal variation in natural selection is expected, but difficult to estimate. Pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits provides a good system for understanding and linking variation in selection to differences in ecological context. We studied pollinator-mediated selection in five populations of Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae) in Costa Rica and Mexico. Using a nonlinear path-analytical approach, we assessed several functional components of selection, and linked variation in pollinator-mediated selection across time and space to variation in pollinator assemblages....

Registration Year

  • 2020
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    9
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    4
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    4
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    2
  • University of Algarve
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research
    2
  • Roscoff Marine Station
    2
  • University of Oulu
    2
  • University of Bremen
    2