17 Works

Data from: Long-term environmental monitoring for assessment of change: measurement inconsistencies over time and potential solutions

Kari E. Ellingsen, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Torkild Tveraa, Judi E. Hewitt & Simon F. Thrush
The importance of long-term environmental monitoring and research for detecting and understanding changes in ecosystems and human impacts on natural systems is widely acknowledged. Over the last decades a number of critical components for successful long-term monitoring have been identified. One basic component is quality assurance/quality control protocols to ensure consistency and comparability of data. In Norway, the authorities require environmental monitoring of the impacts of the offshore petroleum industry on the Norwegian continental shelf,...

Data from: Sociodemographic factors modulate the spatial response of brown bears to vacancies created by hunting

Shane C. Frank, Martin Leclerc, Fanie Pelletier, Frank Rosell, Jon E. Swenson, Richard Bischof, Jonas Kindberg, Hans Geir Eiken, Snorre B. Hagen, Andreas Zedrosser & Jon. E. Swenson
1.There is a growing recognition of the importance of indirect effects from hunting on wildlife populations, e.g., social and behavioral changes due to harvest, which occur after the initial offtake. Nonetheless, little is known about how the removal of members of a population influences the spatial configuration of the survivors. 2.We studied how surviving brown bears (Ursus arctos) used former home ranges that had belonged to casualties of the annual bear hunting season in southcentral...

Data from: Spatial mismatch between management units and movement ecology of a partially migratory ungulate

Erling L. Meisingset, Leif Egil Loe, Øystein Brekkum, Richard Bischof, Inger Maren Rivrud, Unni Støbet Lande, Barbara Zimmermann, Vebjørn Veiberg & Atle Mysterud
1. Population-level management is difficult to achieve if wildlife routinely crosses administrative boundaries, as is particularly frequent for migratory populations. However, the degree of mismatch between management units and scales at which ecological processes operate has rarely been quantified. Such insight is vital for delimiting functional population units of partially migratory species common in northern forest ecosystems. 2. We combined an extensive dataset of 412 GPS-marked red deer (Cervus elaphus) across Norway with information on...

Data from: Blood transcriptomes and de novo identification of candidate loci for mating success in lekking great snipe (Gallinago media)

Jacob Höglund, Biao Wang, Stein Are Saether, Mozes Pil Kyu Blom, Peder Fiske, Peter Halvarsson, Gavin J. Horsburgh, Terry Burke, John Atle Kålås & Robert Ekblom
We assembled the great snipe blood transcriptome using data from fourteen lekking males, in order to de novo identify candidate genes related to sexual selection, and determined the expression profiles in relation to mating success. The three most highly transcribed genes were encoding different haemoglobin subunits. All tended to be overexpressed in males with high mating success. We also called Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) from the transcriptome data and found considerable genetic variation for many...

Data from: Hydropower impacts on reservoir fish populations are modified by environmental variation

Antti P. Eloranta, Anders G. Finstad, Ingeborg P. Helland, Ola Ugedal & Michael Power
Global transition towards renewable energy production has increased the demand for new and more flexible hydropower operations. Before management and stakeholders can make informed choices on potential mitigations, it is essential to understand how the hydropower reservoir ecosystems respond to water level regulation (WLR) impacts that are likely modified by the reservoirs' abiotic and biotic characteristics. Yet, most reservoir studies have been case-specific, which hampers large-scale planning, evaluation and mitigation actions across various reservoir ecosystems....

Data from: Little impact of over-winter parasitism on a free-ranging ungulate in the high Arctic

Anja Morven Carlsson, Steve D. Albon, Stephen J. Coulson, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Ken Wilson, Leif Egil Loe, Vebjørn Veiberg, Robert Justin Irvine & Kenneth Wilson
1.Macroparasites have a central place in wildlife ecology because they have the potential to regulate host populations through effects on reproduction and/or survival. However, there remains a paucity of studies that have demonstrated the regulatory role of these parasites in free-ranging animals. 2.Previous work on Svalbard reindeer demonstrated that the experimental removal of the parasitic gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia gruehneri transmitted in summer, improved reindeer fecundity, and that the species was capable of mediating a density-dependent...

Data from: Demographic influences of translocated individuals on a resident population of house sparrows

Peter S. Ranke, Sigrun Skjelseth, Henrik Pärn, Ivar Herfindal, Åsa Alexandra Borg Borg, Bård Gunner Stokke, Thomas Kvalnes, Thor Harald Ringsby, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Henrik Jensen & Bernt-Erik Saether
Translocation of individuals from source populations to augment small populations facing risk of extinction is an important conservation tool. Here we examine sex-specific differences between resident and translocated house sparrows Passer domesticus in reproductive success and survival, and the contribution of translocated individuals to the growth of a local population. We found evidence for assortative mating based on origin revealed by fewer parentages between translocated males and resident females than expected, and the total number...

Data from: Taking a trip to the shelf: behavioural decisions are mediated by the proximity to foraging habitats in the black-legged kittiwake

Signe Christensen-Dalsgaard, Roel May & Svein-Håkon Lorentsen
1. For marine top predators like seabirds, the oceans represent a multitude of habitats regarding oceanographic conditions and food availability. Worldwide, these habitats are undergoing alterations due to changes in climate and increased anthropogenic impact. This is causing a growing concern on how seabird populations might adapt to these changes. 2. Understanding how seabird populations respond to fluctuating environmental conditions and to what extent behavioural flexibility can buffer variations in food availability, can help predict...

Data from: Sex-specific genetic analysis indicates low correlation between demographic and genetic connectivity in the Scandinavian brown bear (Ursus arctos)

Julia Schregel, Alexander Kopatz, Hans Geir Eiken, Jon E. Swenson & Snorre B. Hagen
Species viability is strongly connected to the degree of gene flow within and among populations. Such genetic population connectivity may closely track demographic population connectivity or, alternatively, the rate of gene flow may change relative to the rate of dispersal. In this study, we have explored the relationship between genetic and demographic population connectivity using the Scandinavian brown bear as model species, due to its pronounced male dispersal and female philopatry. Our expectation, based on...

Data from: Rapid polygenic response to secondary contact in a hybrid species

Glenn-Peter Sætre, Angelica Cuevas, Jo S. Hermansen, Tore O. Elgvin, Laura Piñeiro Fernández, Stein A. Sæther, Camilla Lo Cascio Sætre & Fabrice Eroukhmanoff
Secondary contact between closely related species can have genetic consequences. Competition for essential resources may lead to divergence in heritable traits that reduces interspecific competition, thus leading to increased genetic divergence. Conversely, hybridization and backcrossing can lead to genetic convergence. Here we study a population of a hybrid species, the Italian sparrow (Passer italiae), before and after it came into secondary contact with one of its parent species, the Spanish sparrow (P. hispaniolensis), in 2013....

Data from: Gene flow from domesticated escapes alters the life history of wild Atlantic salmon

Geir H. Bolstad, Kjetil Hindar, Grethe Robertsen, Bror Jonsson, Harald Sægrov, Ola H. Diserud, Peder Fiske, Arne J. Jensen, Kurt Urdal, Tor F. Næsje, Bjørn T. Barlaup, Bjørn Florø-Larsen, Håvard Lo, Eero Niemelä & Sten Karlsson
Interbreeding between domesticated and wild animals occurs in several species. This gene flow has long been anticipated to induce genetic changes in life-history traits of wild populations, thereby influencing population dynamics and viability. Here, we show that individuals with high levels of introgression (domesticated ancestry) have altered age and size at maturation in 62 wild Atlantic salmon Salmo salar populations, including seven ancestral populations to breeding lines of the domesticated salmon. This study documents widespread...

Data from: Freezer on, lights off! Environmental effects on activity rhythms of fish in the Arctic

Kate L. Hawley, Carolyn M. Rosten, Thrond O. Haugen, Guttorm Christensen & Martyn C. Lucas
Polar regions are characterized by acute seasonal changes in the environment, with organisms inhabiting these regions lacking diel photoperiodic information for parts of the year. We present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution analysis of diel and seasonal activity of free-living fishes in polar waters (74°N), subject to extreme variation in photoperiod, temperature and food availability. Using biotelemetry, we tracked two sympatric ecomorphs of lake-dwelling Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus n = 23) over an annual...

Data from: Berry production drives bottom-up effects on body mass and reproductive success in an omnivore

Anne G. Hertel, Richard Bischof, Ola Langvall, Atle Mysterud, Jonas Kindberg, Jon E. Swenson, Andreas Zedrosser & Ola Langval
Obligate herbivores dominate studies of the effects of climate change on mammals, however there is limited empirical evidence for how changes in the abundance or quality of plant food affect mammalian omnivores. Omnivores can exploit a range of different food resources over the course of a year, but they often rely on seasonally restricted highly nutritious fruiting bodies during critical life stages. Brown bears Ursus arctos in Sweden are dependent on berries for fattening before...

Data from: Quantifying risk of overharvest when implementation is uncertain

Lasse F. Eriksen, Pål F. Moa & Erlend B. Nilsen
1. Sustainable harvest management implies an ability to control harvest rates. This is challenging in systems that have limited control of resources and resource users, which is often the case in small game harvest management. The difference between management strategies and actual harvest bag size (i.e. implementation uncertainty) may be substantial, but few studies have explored this. 2. We investigated how different management strategies and ecosystem variables affected realised harvest of willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus...

Data from: Migration in geographic and ecological space by a large herbivore

Wibke Peters, Mark Hebblewhite, Atle Mysterud, Derek Spitz, Stefano Focardi, Ferdinando Urbano, Nicolas Morellet, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, John D.C. Linnell, Francesca Cagnacci & John D. C. Linnell
Partial migration, when only part of the population migrates seasonally while the other part remains resident on the shared range, is the most common form of migration in ungulates. Migration is often defined by spatial separation of seasonal ranges and consequently, classification of individuals as migrants or residents is usually only based on geographic criteria. However, the underlying mechanism for migration is hypothesized to be movement in response to spatiotemporal resource variability and thus, migrants...

Data from: Hidden survival heterogeneity of three common eider populations in response to climate fluctuations

Loreleï Guéry, Sébastien Descamps, Roger Pradel, Sveinn Are Hanssen, Kjell Einar Erikstad, Geir W. Gabrielsen, H. Grant Gilchrist & Joël Bêty
(1) Understanding how individuals and populations respond to fluctuations in climatic conditions is critical to explain and anticipate changes in ecological systems. Most such studies focus on climate impacts on single populations without considering inter- and intra-population heterogeneity. However, comparing geographically dispersed populations limits the risk of faulty generalizations and helps to improve ecological and demographic models. (2) We aimed to determine whether differences in migration tactics among and within populations would induce inter- or...

Data from: Sympatric population divergence within a highly pelagic seabird species complex (Hydrobates spp.)

Rebecca S. Taylor, Anna Bailie, Previn Gulavita, Tim Birt, Tomas Aarvak, Tycho Anker-Nilssen, Daniel C. Barton, Kirsten Lindquist, Yuliana Bedolla-Guzmán, Petra Quillfeldt & Vicki L. Friesen
Both physical and non-physical barriers can restrict gene flow among seabird populations. Understanding the relative importance of non-physical barriers, such as breeding phenology, is key to understanding seabird biodiversity. We investigated drivers of diversification in the Leach’s storm-petrel species complex (Hydrobates spp.) by examining population genetic structure across its range. Variation in the mitochondrial control region and six microsatellite loci was assayed in birds sampled from breeding colonies throughout the North Atlantic and North Pacific...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    17
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    6
  • University of Oslo
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    3
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    3
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    1
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    1