31 Works

Highways associated with expansion of boreal scavengers into the alpine tundra of Fennoscandia

Lars Rød-Eriksen, Johanna Skrutvold, Ivar Herfindal, Henrik Jensen & Nina Elisabeth Eide
1) Habitat fragmentation may affect species distributions through, for example, altered resource availability and shifts in species interactions. Fragmentation by roads has had negative impacts on Fennoscandian alpine ecosystems, with reduction of habitats and connectivity for alpine species. Concurrently, infrastructure development cause influx of subsidies through roadkills and litter, which may facilitate expansion of boreal scavenging species, such as the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), which may intensify negative interactions with alpine species. Hence, understanding the...

Timing is everything: survival of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) postsmolts during events of high salmon lice densities

Thomas Bøhn, Karl Øystein Gjelland, Rosa Serra-Llinares, Bengt Finstad, Raul Primicerio, Rune Nilsen, Ørjan Karlsen, Anne Sandvik, Ove Skilbrei, Kristine Marit Elvik, Øystein Skaala & Pål Bjørn
Atlantic salmon in aquaculture act as reservoir hosts and vectors of parasites like salmon lice and this parasite is shown to harm wild salmonid populations. In the present study, n=29817 tagged Atlantic salmon were studied in four release trials. Half of the released fish were given prophylactic treatment against lice, the other half represented sham control fish. We used a nested design comparing years with low and high lice density and seasonal dynamics in infestation...

Life history genomic regions explain differences in Atlantic salmon marine diet specialization

Tutku Aykanat, Martin Rasmussen, Mikhail Ozerov, Eero Niemelä, Lars Paulin, Juha-Pekka Vaha, Kjetil Hindar, Vidar Wennevik, Torstein Pedersen, Martin Svenning & Craig Primmer
Abstract 1. Animals employ various foraging strategies along their ontogeny to acquire energy, and with varying degree of efficiencies, to support growth, maturation and subsequent reproduction events. Individuals that can efficiently acquire energy early are more likely to mature at an earlier age, as a result of faster energy gain which can fuel maturation and reproduction. 2. We aimed to test the hypothesis that heritable resource acquisition variation that co-varies with efficiency along the ontogeny...

Genotype data from: Restoration of transborder connectivity for Fennoscandian brown bears (Ursus arctos)

Alexander Kopatz, Kleven Oddmund, Kojola Ilpo, Aspi Jouni, Anita J. Norman, Göran Spong, Niclas Gyllenstrand, Love Dalén, Ida Fløystad, Snorre B. Hagen, Jonas Kindberg & Øystein Flagstad
Knowledge about the connectivity among natural populations is essential to identify management units for effective conservation actions. Conservation-minded management has led to the recovery of large carnivore populations in northern Europe, possibly restoring connectivity between the two separated, but expanding brown bear (Ursus arctos) populations on the Scandinavian peninsula to the west and Karelia, a part of the large Eurasian population, to the east. The degree of connectivity between these populations has been poorly understood,...

Data used in: \"Impacts of predator-mediated interactions along a climatic gradient on the population dynamics of an alpine bird\"

Diana Bowler, Mikkel Kvasnes, Hans Pedersen, Brett Sandercock & Erlend Nilsen
Data for: Impacts of predator-mediated interactions along a climatic gradient on the population dynamics of an alpine bird doi: 10.1098/rspb.2020.2653 Diana E. Bowler, Mikkel A. J. Kvasnes, Hans C. Pedersen, Brett K. Sandercock, Erlend B. Nilsen Questions to: diana.e.bowler@gmail.com or erlend.nilsen@nina.no

Fungal sporocarps house diverse and host-specific communities of fungicolous fungi

Sundy Maurice, Gontran Arnault, Jenni Norden, Synnøve Smebye Botnen, Otto Miettinen & Håvard Kauserud
Sporocarps (fruit bodies) are the sexual reproductive stage in the life cycle of many fungi. They are highly nutritious and consequently vulnerable to grazing by birds and small mammals, and invertebrates, and can be infected by microbial and fungal parasites and pathogens. The complexity of communities thriving inside sporocarps is largely unknown. In this study, we revealed the diversity, taxonomic composition and host-preference of fungicolous fungi (i.e fungi that feed on other fungi) in sporocarps....

Data from: Exploratory and confirmatory research in the open science era

Erlend B. Nilsen, Diana Bowler & John Linnell
1. Applied ecological research is increasingly inspired by the Open Science movement. However, new challenges about how we define our science when biodiversity data is being shared and re-used are not solved. Among these challenges is the risk associated with blurring the distinction between research that mainly seeks to explore patterns with no a-priori articulated hypotheses (exploratory research), and research that explicitly tests a-priori formulated hypotheses (confirmatory research). 2. A rapid screening of a random...

Data from: Ecological impact assessments of alien species in Norway

Hanno Sandvik, Olga Hilmo, Snorre Henriksen, Reidar Elven, Per Arvid Åsen, Hanne Hegre, Oddvar Pedersen, Per Anker Pedersen, Heidi Solstad, Vigdis Vandvik, Kristine B. Westergaard, Frode Ødegaard, Sandra Åström, Hallvard Elven, Anders Endrestøl, Øivind Gammelmo, Bjørn Arild Hatteland, Halvor Solheim, Björn Nordén, Leif Sundheim, Venche Talgø, Tone Falkenhaug, Bjørn Gulliksen, Anders Jelmert, Eivind Oug … & Lisbeth Gederaas
Due to globalisation, trade and transport, the spread of alien species is increasing dramatically. Some alien species become ecologically harmful by threatening native biota. This can lead to irreversible changes in local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and, ultimately, to biotic homogenisation. We risk-assessed all alien plants, animals, fungi and algae, within certain delimitations, that are known to reproduce in Norway. Mainland Norway and the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard plus Jan Mayen were treated as separate...

Data from: Assessing the usefulness of Citizen Science Data for habitat suitability modelling: opportunistic reporting versus sampling based on a systematic protocol

Laura Henckel, Ute Bradter, Mari Jönsson, Nick Isaac & Tord Snäll
Aim: To evaluate the potential of models based on opportunistic reporting (OR) compared to models based on data from a systematic protocol (SP) for modelling species distributions. We compared model performance for eight forest bird species with contrasting spatial distributions, habitat requirements, and rarity. Differences in the reporting of species were also assessed. Finally, we tested potential improvement of models when inferring high quality absences from OR based on questionnaires sent to observers. Location: Both...

Scavenger community structure along an environmental gradient from boreal forest to alpine tundra in Scandinavia

Gjermund Gomo, Lars Rød-Eriksen, Harry P. Andreassen, Jenny Mattisson, Morten Odden, Olivier Devineau & Nina E. Eide
Scavengers can have strong impacts on food webs, and awareness of their role in ecosystems have increased during the last decades. In our study, we used baited camera traps to quantify the structure of the winter scavenger community in central Scandinavia across a forest-alpine continuum and assess how climatic conditions affected spatial patterns of species occurrences. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that the main habitat type (forest or alpine tundra) and snow depth were main determinants...

Data from: Effect of tower base painting on willow ptarmigan collision rates with wind turbines

Bård Stokke, Torgeir Nygard, Ulla Falkdalen, Hans Pedersen & Roel May
1. Birds colliding with turbine rotor blades is a well-known negative consequence of wind-power plants. However, there has been far less attention to the risk of birds colliding with the turbine towers, and how to mitigate this risk. 2. Based on data from the Smøla wind-power plant in Central Norway, it seems highly likely that willow ptarmigan (the only gallinaceous species found on the island) is prone to collide with turbine towers. By employing a...

Data from: Multi-generational genetic consequences of reinforcement in a bird metapopulation

Peter S. Ranke, Sigrun Skjelseth, Ingerid Julie Hagen, Anna Maria Billing, Åsa Alexandra Borg Pedersen, Henrik Pärn, Thor Harald Ringsby, Bernt-Erik Sæther & Henrik Jensen
Translocation of conspecific individuals to reduce extinction risk of small, isolated populations and prevent genetic depletion is a powerful tool in conservation biology. An important question is how the translocated individuals influence the long-term genetic composition of the recipient population. Here, we experimentally reinforced a house sparrow (Passer domesticus) population, and examined the impact of this translocation on allele frequencies, levels of heterozygosity and genetic differentiation over six cohorts. We found no permanent increase in...

Resource-driven colonization by cod in a high Arctic food web

Edda Johannesen, Nigel Yoccoz, Torkild Tveraa, Nancy Shackell, Kari Ellingsen, Andrey Dolgov & Kenneth Frank
Climate change is commonly associated with many species redistributions and the influence of other factors may be marginalized, especially in the rapidly warming Arctic. The Barents Sea, a high latitude large marine ecosystem in the Northeast Atlantic has experienced above average temperatures since the mid 2000’s with divergent bottom temperature trends at sub-regional scales. Concurrently, the Barents Sea stock of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, one of the most important commercial fish stocks in the world,...

When does weather synchronise life history traits? Spatiotemporal patterns in juvenile body mass of two ungulates

Ivar Herfindal, Torkild Tveraa, Audun Stien, Erling Johan Solberg & Vidar Grøtan
1. Theory predicts that animal populations will be synchronised over large distances by weather and climatic conditions with high spatial synchrony. However, local variation in population responses to weather, and low synchrony in key weather variables or in other ecological processes may reduce the population synchrony. 2. We investigated to what extent temperature and precipitation during different periods of the year synchronised juvenile body mass of moose and reindeer in Norway. We expected high synchronising...

The unique spatial ecology of human hunters

Atle Mysterud, Inger Maren Rivrud, Hildegunn Viljugrein, Vegard Gundersen & Christer Rolandsen
Human hunters are described as ‘superpredators’ with a unique ecology. Chronic Wasting Disease among cervids and African swine fever among wild boar are emerging wildlife diseases in Europe with huge economic and cultural repercussions. Understanding hunter movements at broad scales has implications for how to control their spread. Here we show, based on the analysis of the settlement patterns and movements of reindeer (n = 9,685), red deer (n = 47,845), moose (n = 60,365),...

Environmental change reduces body condition, but not population growth, in a high-arctic herbivore

Kate Layton-Matthews, Vidar Grøtan, Brage Bremset Hansen, Maarten J. J.E. Loonen, Eva Fuglei & Dylan Childs
Environmental change influences fitness-related traits and demographic rates, which in herbivores are often linked to resource-driven variation in body condition. Coupled body condition-demographic responses may therefore be important for herbivore population dynamics in fluctuating environments, such as the Arctic. We applied a transient Life-Table Response Experiment (‘transient-LTRE’) to demographic data from Svalbard barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis), to quantify their population-dynamic responses to changes in body mass. We partitioned contributions from direct and delayed demographic and...

Migration of tagged silver eels in the Atlantic 2006 - 2014

Known and estimated locations of silver European eels in the Atlantic from 2006 to 2014 derived from popup satellite tags and archival tags. Other data associated with the tagging experiments such as the length, weight, fat percentage, Pankhurst index and Fin index are also included. Locations were either known (from transmitted positions) or were estimated based on the temperature at depth data recorded by electronic tags (latitude) and the timing of steep dives at dawn...

Fear the reaper: ungulate carcasses may generate an ephemeral landscape of fear for rodents

Shane Frank, Rakel Blaalid, Martin Mayer, Andreas Zedrosser & Sam Steyaert
Animal carcasses provide an ephemeral pulse of nutrients for scavengers that utilize them. Carcass sites can increase species interactions and/or ephemeral, localized landscapes of fear for prey within the vicinity. Few studies have applied the landscape of fear to carcasses. Here we use a mass die-off of reindeer caused by lightning in Norway to test whether rodents avoided larger scavengers (e.g. corvids and fox). We used the presence and abundance of faeces as a proxy...

Hidden treasure of the Gobi: understanding how water limits range use of khulan in the Mongolian Gobi

John C. Payne, Bayarbaatar Buuveibaatar, Diana E. Bowler, Kirk A. Olson, Chris Walzer & Petra Kaczensky
Most large herbivores in arid landscapes need to drink which constrains their movements and makes them vulnerable to disturbance. Asiatic wild ass or khulan (Equus hemionus) were widespread and abundant throughout the arid landscapes of Central Asia and Mongolia, but have undergone dramatic population declines and range constrictions; denying khulan access to water is believed to have played a major role. Mongolia’s South Gobi Region now houses the world largest remaining khulan population, but is...

End-user involvement to improve predictions and management of populations with complex dynamics and multiple drivers

John-André Henden, Einar Asbjørnsen, Rolf Ims, Nigel Yoccoz, Audun Stien, Jarad Mellard, Torkild Tveraa, Filippo Marolla & Jane Jepsen
Sustainable management of wildlife populations can be aided by building models that both identify current drivers of natural dynamics and provide near-term predictions of future states. We employed a Strategic Foresight Protocol (SFP) involving stakeholders to decide the purpose and structure of a dynamic state-space model for the population dynamics of the willow ptarmigan - a popular game species in Norway. Based on local knowledge of stakeholders, it was decided that the model should include...

Opposing fitness consequences of habitat use in a harvested moose population

Endre Grüner Ofstad, Endre Ofstad, Stine Markussen, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Erling Johan Solberg, Morten Heim, Hallvard Haanes, Knut Røed & Ivar Herfindal
1. Landscape changes are happening at an unprecedented pace, and together with high levels of wildlife harvesting humans have a large effect on wildlife populations. A thorough knowledge of their combined influence on individual fitness is important in order to understand factors affecting population dynamics. 2. The goal of the study was to assess the individual consistency in the use of risky habitat types, and how habitat use was related to fitness components and life-history...

Using ecological context to interpret spatiotemporal variation in natural selection

Elena Albertsen, Elena Albertsen, Øystein Opedal, Geir Bolstad, Rocio Barrales, Thomas Hansen, Christophe Pelabon & W. Scott Armbruster
Spatiotemporal variation in natural selection is expected, but difficult to estimate. Pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits provides a good system for understanding and linking variation in selection to differences in ecological context. We studied pollinator-mediated selection in five populations of Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae) in Costa Rica and Mexico. Using a nonlinear path-analytical approach, we assessed several functional components of selection, and linked variation in pollinator-mediated selection across time and space to variation in pollinator assemblages....

Data from: Congruence, but no cascade - pelagic biodiversity across 3 trophic levels in Nordic lakes

Tom Andersen, Dag O. Hessen, Johnny Håll, Maryia Khomich, Marcia Kyle, Markus Lindholm, Serana Rasconi, Birger Skjelbred, Jan-Erik Thrane & Bjørn Walseng
Covariation in species richness and community structure across taxonomical groups (cross-taxon congruence) has practical consequences for the identification of biodiversity surrogates and proxies, as well as theoretical ramifications for understanding the mechanisms maintaining and sustaining biodiversity. We found there to exist a high cross-taxon congruence between phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish in 73 large Scandinavian lakes across a 750 km longitudinal transect. The fraction of the total diversity variation explained by local environment alone was small...

Data from: Consistent scaling of inbreeding depression in space and time in a house sparrow metapopulation

Alina K. Niskanen, Anna M. Billing, Håkon Holand, Ingerid J. Hagen, Yimen G. Araya-Ajoy, Arild Husby, Bernt Rønning, Ane Marlene Myhre, Peter Sjolte Ranke, Thomas Kvalnes, Henrik Pärn, Thor Harald Ringsby, Sigbjørn Lien, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Stefanie Muff & Henrik Jensen
Inbreeding may increase the extinction risk of small populations. Yet, studies using modern genomic tools to investigate inbreeding depression in nature have been limited to single populations, and little is known about the dynamics of inbreeding depression in subdivided populations over time. Natural populations often experience different environmental conditions and differ in demographic history and genetic composition; characteristics that can affect the severity of inbreeding depression. We utilised extensive long-term data on more than 3100...

A genome-wide linkage map for the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) provides insights into the evolutionary history of the avian genome

Ingerid Hagen, Sigbjørn Lien, Anna Billing, Tore O. Elgvin, Cassandra Trier, Alina K. Niskanen, Maja Tarka, Jon Slate, Glenn-Peter Sætre & Henrik Jensen
The house sparrow is an important model species for studying physiological, ecological and evolutionary processes in wild populations. Here, we present a medium density, genome wide linkage map for house sparrow (Passer domesticus) that has aided the assembly of the house sparrow reference genome, and that will provide an important resource for ongoing mapping of genes controlling important traits in the ecology and evolution of this species. Using a custom house sparrow 10K iSelect Illumina...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    31
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    10
  • University of Oslo
    8
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    6
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    5
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • University of Oulu
    3
  • Institute of Marine Research
    3
  • Lund University
    2