41 Works

Great cormorant diet data from the Norwegian coast

Nina Dehnhard, Magdalene Langset, Asgeir Aglen, Svein-Håkon Lorentsen & Tycho Anker-Nilssen
Piscivorous wildlife is often perceived as competitors by humans. Great cormorants of the continental subspecies (Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis) in the Baltic and North Sea increase, while local cod (Gadus morhua) stocks decline. In contrast, numbers of the Atlantic subspecies (P. c. carbo), breeding along the Norwegian and Barents Seas have been relatively stable. We investigated the diet of both great cormorant subspecies in breeding colonies along the Norwegian Coast from Lofoten to the Skagerrak and...

Short-Tandem-Repeat (STR) marker set for Eurasian lynx for article: Genetic analysis indicates spatial-dependent patterns of sex-biased dispersal in Eurasian lynx in Finland

Annika Herrero, Cornelya Klutsch, Katja Holmala, Simo Maduna, Alexander Kopatz, Hans Geir Eiken & Snorre Hagen
Conservation and management of large carnivores requires knowledge of female and male dispersal. Such information is crucial to evaluate the population’s status and thus management actions. This knowledge is challenging to obtain, often incomplete and contradictory at times. The size of the target population and the methods applied can bias the results. Also, population history and biological or environmental influences can affect dispersal on different scales within a study area. We have genotyped Eurasian lynx...

Extreme home range sizes among Eurasian lynx at the northern edge of their biogeographic range

Jenny Mattisson, John D. C. Linnell & John Odden
Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) have a wide distribution across Eurasia. The northern edge of this distribution is in Norway, where they reach up to 72 degrees north. We conducted a study of lynx space use in this region from 2007 to 2013 using GPS telemetry. The home range sizes averaged 2606 (± 438 SE) km2 for males (n=9 ranges) and 1456 (± 179 SE) km2 for females (n=24 ranges). These are the largest home ranges...

Of wolves and bears: Seasonal drivers of interference and exploitation competition between apex predators

Aimee Tallian, Andrés Ordiz, Matthew Metz, Barbara Zimmermann, Camilla Wikenros, Douglas Smith, Daniel Stahler, Petter Wabakken, Jon Swenson, Håkan Sand & Jonas Kindberg
Competition between apex predators can alter the strength of top-down forcing, yet we know little about the behavioral mechanisms that drive competition in multipredator ecosystems. Interactions between predators can be synergistic (facilitative) or antagonistic (inhibitive), both of which are widespread in nature, vary in strength between species and across space and time, and affect predation patterns and predator-prey dynamics. Recent research suggests gray wolf (Canis lupus) kill rates decrease where they are sympatric with brown...

Data and scripts for: Quantitative assessment of observed vs. predicted responses to selection

Christophe Pelabon, Elena Albertsen, Arnaud Le Rouzic, Cyril Firmat, Geir H. Bolstad, W. Scott Armbruster & Thomas Hansen
Although artificial-selection experiments seem well suited to testing our ability to predict evolution, the correspondence between predicted and observed responses is often ambiguous due to the lack of uncertainty estimates. We present equations for assessing prediction error in direct and indirect responses to selection that integrate uncertainty in genetic parameters used for prediction and sampling effects during selection. Using these, we analyzed a selection experiment on floral traits replicated in two taxa of the Dalechampia...

Trust in researchers and researchers’ statements in large carnivore conservation

Kristin Mathiesen, Magnus Barmoen, Kim Magnus Bærum & Maria Johansson
Human-wildlife interactions occur when humans and wildlife overlap in the same landscapes. Due to the growing human population, the number of interactions will continue to increase, and in some cases, develop further into social conflicts. Conflicts may occur between people disagreeing about wildlife conservation or arguing over which wildlife management measures should be taken. Social conflicts between humans are based on different attitudes, values and land-use aspirations. The success of solving these social conflicts strongly...

Social environment shapes female settlement decisions in a solitary carnivore

Jenny Hansen, Anne Hertel, Shane Frank, Jonas Kindberg & Andreas Zedrosser
How and where a female selects an area to settle and breed is of central importance in dispersal and population ecology as it governs range expansion and gene flow. Social structure and organization have been shown to influence settlement decisions, but its importance in settlement of large, solitary mammals is largely unknown. We investigate how the identity of overlapping conspecifics on the landscape, acquired during the maternal care period, influences selection of settlement home ranges...

Whole-genome resequencing confirms reproductive isolation between sympatric demes of brown trout (Salmo trutta) detected with allozymes

Atal Saha, Anastasia Andersson, Sara Kurland, Naomi Keehnen, Verena Kutschera, Ola Hössjer, Diana Ekman, Sten Karlsson, Marty Kardos, Gunnar Ståhl, Fred Allendorf, Nils Ryman & Linda Laikre
The sympatric existence of genetically distinct populations of the same species remains a puzzle in ecology. Coexisting salmonid fish populations are known from over 100 freshwater lakes. Most studies of sympatric populations have used limited numbers of genetic markers making it unclear if genetic divergence involves only certain parts of the genome. We return to the first reported case of salmonid sympatry, initially detected through contrasting homozygosity at a single allozyme locus (coding for lactate...

MetaComNet: A random forest-based framework for making spatial prediction of plant-pollinator interactions

Markus Arne Kjær Sydenham, Zander Venter, Trond Reitan, Claus Rasmussen, Astrid Skrindo, Daniel Skoog, Kaj-Andreas Hanevik, Stein Joar Hegland, Yoko Dupont, Anders Nielsen, Joseph Chipperfield & Graciela Rusch
1. Predicting plant-pollinator interaction networks over space and time will improve our understanding of how environmental change is likely to impact the functioning of ecosystems. Here we propose a framework for producing spatially explicit predictions of the occurrence and number of pairwise plant-pollinator interactions and of the species richness, diversity, and abundance of pollinators visiting flowers. We call the framework ‘MetaComNet’ because it aims to link metacommunity dynamics to the assembly of ecological networks. 2....

Data from: Integrated population models poorly estimate the demographic contribution of immigration

Matthieu Paquet, Jonas Knape, Debora Arlt, Pär Forslund, Tomas Pärt, Øystein Flagstad, Carl G. Jones, Malcolm A. C. Nicoll, Ken Norris, Josephine M. Pemberton, Håkan Sand, Linn Svensson, Vikash Tatayah, Petter Wabakken, Camilla Wikenros, Mikael Åkesson & Matthew Low
Estimating the contribution of demographic parameters to changes in population growth is essential for understanding why populations fluctuate. Integrated Population Models (IPMs) offer a possibility to estimate contributions of additional demographic parameters, for which no data have been explicitly collected: typically immigration. Such parametersare often subsequently highlighted as important drivers of population growth. Yet, accuracy in estimating their temporal variation, and consequently their contribution to changes in population growth rate, has not been investigated. To...

Directed endozoochorous dispersal by scavengers facilitate sexual reproduction in otherwise clonal plants at cadaver sites

Mie P. Arnberg, Shane C. Frank, Rakel Blaalid, Marie L. Davey, Amy E. Eycott & Sam M. J. G. Steyaert
The regeneration niche of many plant species involves spatially and temporally unpredictable disturbances, called recruitment windows of opportunity. However, even species with clear dispersal adaptations such as fleshy berries may not successfully reach such elusive regeneration microsites. Ericaceous, berry-producing species in the northern hemisphere demonstrate this dispersal limitation. They are said to display a reproductive paradox owing to their lack of regeneration in apparently suitable microsites despite considerable investment in producing large quantities of berries....

Disentangling the roles of plant functional diversity and plaint traits in regulating plant nitrogen accumulation and denitrification in freshwaters

Maidul I. Choudhury, Sara Hallin, Frauke Ecke, Valerie Hubalek, Jaanis Juhanson, André Frainer & Brendan G. McKie
1. There is a growing recognition that functional measures of diversity, based on quantification of functionally important species traits, are useful for explaining variation in ecosystem processes. However, the mechanisms linking functional diversity to different processes remain poorly understood, hindering development of a predictive framework for ecosystem functioning based on species traits. 2. The current understanding of how the functional traits of aquatic plants (macrophytes) affect nitrogen (N) cycling by regulating microbial communities and their...

Selection against individuals from genetic introgression of escaped farmed salmon in a natural population of Atlantic salmon

Sebastian Wacker, Tonje Aronsen, Sten Karlsson, Ola Ugedal, Ola Diserud, Eva Ulvan, Kjetil Hindar & Tor Næsje
The viability of wild Atlantic salmon populations is threatened by genetic introgression from escaped farmed salmon. Farmed Atlantic salmon are genetically improved for important commercial traits and a life in captivity but are poorly adapted to the natural environment. The rate of geneflow from escaped farmed to wild salmon depends on their spawning success and on offspring survival at various life-stages. We here investigate relative survival of introgressed juvenile Atlantic salmon (parr) in a river...

Microsatellite variation in Nordic semi-domestic reindeer

Knut Røed, Kjersti Kvie, Bård-Jørgen Bårdsen, Sauli Laaksonen, Hannes Lohi, Juoko Kumpula, Kjell-Åke Aronsson, Birgitta Åhman, Jørn Våge & Øystein Holand
We have analyzed DNA microsatellites and the mitochondrial control region in reindeer from 31 different husbandry areas in Norway, Sweden and Finland in order to better understand the processes that underlie the genetic variability of the Nordic domestic herds. The distinct differentiation found in the nuclear markers but less so in the mitochondrial marker, gives evidence of an origin from a common ancestral population which later evolved into the two main gene pools characterizing the...

Herbivores reduce seedling recruitment in alpine plant communities

Øystein H. Opedal, Kristin Nystuen, Dagmar Hagen, Håkon Holien, Mia Sørensen, Simone Lang, Sigrid Lindmo, G. RIchard Strimbeck & Bente Graae
Through changes in climate and other environmental factors, alpine tundra ecosystems are subject to increased cover of erect shrubs, reduced predictability of rodent dynamics, and changes in wild and domesticated herbivore densities. To predict the dynamics of these ecosystems, we need to understand how these simultaneous changes affect alpine vegetation. In the long term, vegetation dynamics may depend critically on seedling recruitment. To study drivers of alpine plant seedling recruitment, we set up a field...

Exceptionally high apparent adult survival in three tropical species of plovers in Madagascar

William Jones, Luke Eberhart-Hertel, Robert Freckleton, Joseph Hoffmann, Oliver Krüger, Brett Sandercock, Orsolya Vincze, Sama Zefania & Tamás Székely
Adult survival is a key component of population dynamics and understanding variation in and the drivers of adult survival rates and longevity is critical for ecological and evolutionary studies, as well as for conservation biology and practice. Tropical species of landbirds are often selected to have higher adult survival due to high nest predation rates, but it is unclear if the same patterns occur in other avian lineages with different life history strategies. Here, we...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    41

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    41

Affiliations

  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    41
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    8
  • Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences
    7
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    7
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    6
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    5
  • University of Oslo
    4
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    4
  • Lund University
    3
  • University of Aberdeen
    3