6 Works

Data from: Exploring rainforest diversification using demographic model testing in the African foam-nest treefrog (Chiromantis rufescens)

Adam Leache, Daniel Portik, Danielle Rivera, Mark-Oliver Rodel, Johannes Penner, Václav Gvoždík, Eli Greenbaum, Gregory Jongsma, Caleb Ofori-Boateng, Marius Burger, Edem Eniang, Rayna Bell & Matthew Fujita
Aim: Species with wide distributions spanning the African Guinean and Congolian rainforests are often composed of genetically distinct populations or cryptic species with geographic distributions that mirror the locations of the remaining forest habitats. We used phylogeographic inference and demographic model testing to evaluate diversification models in a widespread rainforest species, the African Foam-nest Treefrog (Chiromantis rufescens). Location: Guinean and Congolian rainforests, West and Central Africa. Taxon: Chiromantis rufescens. Methods: We collected mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)...

Persistence of an endangered native duck, feral mallards, and multiple hybrid swarms across the main Hawaiian Islands

Caitlin Wells, Philip Lavretsky, Michael Sorenson, Jeffrey Peters, Jeffrey DaCosta, Stephen Turnbull, Kimberly Uyehara, Christopher Malachowski, Bruce Dugger, John Eadie & Andrew Engilis
Interspecific hybridization is recognized as an important process in the evolutionary dynamics of both speciation and the reversal of speciation. However, our understanding of the spatial and temporal patterns of hybridization that erode versus promote species boundaries is incomplete. The endangered, endemic koloa maoli (or Hawaiian duck, Anas wyvilliana) is thought to be threatened with genetic extinction through ongoing hybridization with an introduced congener, the feral mallard (A. platyrhynchos). We investigated spatial and temporal variation...

Data from: ddRAD‐seq data reveal significant genome‐wide population structure and divergent genomic regions that distinguish the mallard and close relatives in North America

Philip Lavretsky, Jeffrey M. DaCosta, Michael D. Sorenson, Kevin G. McCracken & Jeffrey L. Peters
Recently evolved species typically share genetic variation across their genomes due to incomplete lineage sorting and/or ongoing gene flow. Given only subtle allele frequency differences at most loci and the expectation that divergent selection may affect only a tiny fraction of the genome, distinguishing closely related species based on multi‐locus data requires substantial genomic coverage. In this study, we used ddRAD‐seq to sample the genomes of five recently diverged, New World “mallards” (Anas spp.), a...

Data from: A global dataset for economic losses of extreme hydrological events during 1960-2014

Bo Tao, Liping Gao, Yunxuan Miao, Lihua Zhang, Xia Song, Wei Ren, Liyuan He & Xiaofeng Xu
A comprehensive dataset of extreme hydrological events (EHEs) – floods and droughts, consisting of 2,171 occurrences worldwide, during 1960‐2014 was compiled, and then their economic losses were normalized using a price index in U.S. dollar. The dataset showed a significant increasing trend of EHEs before 2000, while a slight post‐2000 decline. Correspondingly, the EHEs‐caused economic losses increased obviously before 2000 followed by a slight decrease; the post‐2000 decline could be partially attributed to the decreases...

Data from: When one phenotype is not enough - divergent evolutionary trajectories govern venom variation in a widespread rattlesnake species

Giulia Zancolli, Juan J. Calvete, Michael D. Cardwell, Harry W. Greene, William K. Hayes, Matthew J. Hegarty, Hans-Werner Herrmann, Andrew T. Holycross, Dominic I. Lannutti, John F. Mulley, Libia Sanz, Zachary D. Travis, Joshua R. Whorley, Catharine E. Wüster & Wolfgang Wuster
Understanding the origin and maintenance of phenotypic variation, particularly across a continuous spatial distribution, represents a key challenge in evolutionary biology. For this, animal venoms represent ideal study systems: they are complex, variable, yet easily quantifiable molecular phenotypes with a clear function. Rattlesnakes display tremendous variation in their venom composition, mostly through strongly dichotomous venom strategies, which may even coexist within single species. Here, through dense, widespread population-level sampling of the Mojave rattlesnake, Crotalus scutulatus,...

Data from: Idenitfying hybrids & the genomics of hybridization: mallards & American black ducks of Eastern North America

Philip Lavretsky, Thijs Janzen & Kevin G. McCracken
Resolving evolutionary relationships and establishing population structure depends on molecular diagnosability that is often limited for closely related taxa. Here, we use 3,200 ddRAD-seq loci across 290 mallards, American black ducks, and putative hybrids to establish population structure and estimate hybridization rates. We test between traditional assignment probability and accumulated recombination events based analyses to assign hybrids to generational classes. For hybrid identification, we report the distribution of recombination events complements ADMIXTURE simulation by extending...

Registration Year

  • 2019
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • The University of Texas at El Paso
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  • San Diego State University
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  • University of Miami
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  • Boston College
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  • Wright State University
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  • Bangor University
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  • University of Washington
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  • Seattle Central College
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  • Aberystwyth University
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