163 Works

Access to Grey Content: An Analysis of Grey Literature based on Citation and Survey Data: A Follow-up Study

Dominic Farace, Jerry Frantzen & Albert Boekhorst
Co-authored together with Jerry Frantzen, Albert Boekhorst, Joachim Schöpfel, and Christine Stock. Grey literature, an area of interest to special librarians and information professionals, can be traced back a half-century. However, grey literature as a specialized field in information studies is less than a decade old. At GL’97 in Luxembourg, grey literature was redefined “as information produced on all levels of government, academics, business and industry in electronic and print formats not controlled by commercial...

Data from: Population genetics of Wolbachia-infected, parthenogenetic and uninfected, sexual populations of Tetrastichus coeruleus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

Barbara M. Reumer, Jacques J. M. Van Alphen & Ken Kraaijeveld
Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria known to manipulate the reproduction of their hosts. These manipulations are expected to have consequences on the population genetics of the host, such as heterozygosity levels, genetic diversity and gene flow. The parasitoid wasp Tetrastichus coeruleus has populations that are infected with parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia and populations that are not infected. We studied the population genetics of T. coeruleus between and within Wolbachia-infected and uninfected populations, using nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA....

Data from: Soaring across continents: decision-making of a soaring migrant under changing atmospheric conditions along an entire flyway

Wouter Vansteelant, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, James D. McLaren, Jan Van Diermen, Willem Bouten, Wouter M. G. Vansteelant & James McLaren
(1) Thermal soaring birds reduce flight-energy costs by alternatingly gaining altitude in thermals and gliding across the earth’s surface. To find out how soaring migrants adjust their flight behaviour to dynamic atmospheric conditions across entire migration routes, we combined optimal soaring migration theory with high-resolution GPS tracking data of migrating Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus and wind data from a global numerical atmospheric model. (2) We compared measurements of gliding air speeds to predictions based on...

Data from: Latitudinal and altitudinal patterns of plant community diversity on mountain summits across the tropical Andes

Francisco Cuesta, Priscilla Muriel, Luis D. Llambí, Stephan Halloy, Nikolay Aguirre, Stephan Beck, Julieta Carilla, Rosa I. Meneses, Soledad Cuello, Alfredo Grau, Luis E. Gámez, Javier Irazábal, Jorge Jacome, Ricardo Jaramillo, Lirey Ramírez, Natalia Samaniego, David Suárez-Duque, Natali Thompson, Alfredo Tupayachi, Paul Viñas, Karina Yager, María T. Becerra, Harald Pauli & William D. Gosling
The high tropical Andes host one of the richest alpine floras of the world, with exceptionally high levels of endemism and turnover rates. Yet, little is known about the patterns and processes that structure altitudinal and latitudinal variation in plant community diversity. Herein we present the first continental-scale comparative study of plant community diversity on summits of the tropical Andes. Data were obtained from 792 permanent vegetation plots (1m2) within 50 summits, distributed along a...

Data from: A circannual perspective on daily and total flight distances in a long-distance migratory raptor, the Montagu's harrier, Circus pygargus

Almut E. Schlaich, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Henning Heldbjerg, Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Iben H. Sørensen, Alexandre Villers & Christiaan Both
Long-distance migrants are particularly recognized for the distances covered on migration, yet little is known about the distances they cover during the rest of the year. GPS-tracks of 29 Montagu's harriers from breeding areas in France, The Netherlands and Denmark showed that harriers fly between 35 653 and 88 049 km yr−1, of which on average only 28.5% is on migration. Mean daily distances during migration were 296 km d−1 in autumn and 252 km...

Data from: Patterns of reproductive isolation in a haplodiploid – strong post‐mating, prezygotic barriers among three forms of a social spider mite

Yukie Sato, Hironori Sakamoto, Tetsuo Gotoh, Yutaka Saito, Jung-Tai Chao, Martijn Egas & Atsushi Mochizuki
In speciation research, much attention is paid to the evolution of reproductive barriers, preventing diverging groups from hybridizing back into one gene pool. The prevalent view is that reproductive barriers evolve gradually as a byproduct of genetic changes accumulated by natural selection and genetic drift in groups that are segregated spatially and/or temporally. Reproductive barriers, however, can also be reinforced by natural selection against maladaptive hybridization. These mutually compatible theories are both empirically supported by...

Data from: Host-targeted RAD-Seq reveals genetic changes in the coral Oculina patagonica associated with range expansion along the Spanish Mediterranean coast

Karine Posbic Leydet, Carsten G.B. Grupstra, Rafel Coma, Marta Ribes, Michael E. Hellberg & Carsten G. B. Grupstra
Many organisms are expanding their ranges in response to changing environmental conditions. Understanding the patterns of genetic diversity and adaptation along an expansion front is crucial to assessing a species’ long-term success. While next-generation sequencing techniques can reveal these changes in fine detail, ascribing them to a particular species can be difficult for organisms that live in close association with symbionts. Using a novel modified restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) protocol to target coral DNA,...

Data from: Influence of full-length dystrophin on brain volumes in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Bauke Kogelman, Artem Khmelinskii, Ingrid Verhaart, Laura Van Vliet, Diewertje I. Bink, Annemieke Aartsma-Rus, Maaike Van Putten & Louise Van Der Weerd
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) affects besides muscle also the brain, resulting in memory and behavioral problems. The consequences of dystrophinopathy on gross macroscopic alterations are unclear. To elucidate the effect of dystrophin expression on brain morphology, we used high-resolution post-mortem MRI in mouse models that either express 0% (mdx), 100% (BL10) or a low amount of full-length dystrophin (mdx-Xist∆hs). While absence or low amounts of dystrophin did not result in significantly different whole brain volume...

Data from: Field validation of radar systems for monitoring bird migration

Cecilia Nilsson, Adriaan M. Dokter, Baptiste Schmid, Martina Scacco, Liesbeth Verlinden, Johan Bäckman, Günther Haase, Giacomo Dell'Omo, Jason W. Chapman, Hidde Leijnse & Felix Liechti
1. Advances in information technology are increasing the use of radar as a tool to investigate and monitor bird migration movements. We set up a field campaign to compare and validate outputs from different radar systems. 2. Here we compare the pattern of nocturnal bird migration movements recorded by four different radar systems at a site in southern Sweden. Within the range of the weather radar (WR) Ängelholm, we operated a “BirdScan” (BS) dedicated bird...

Data from: The positive side of a negative reference: the delay between linguistic processing and common ground

Edmundo Kronmüller, Ira Noveck, Natalia Rivera, Francisco Jaume-Guazzini & Dale Barr
Interlocutors converge on names to refer to entities. For example, a speaker might refer to a novel looking object as the jellyfish and, once identified, the listener will too. The hypothesized mechanism behind such referential precedents is a subject of debate. The common ground view claims that listeners register the object as well as the identity of the speaker who coined the label. The linguistic view claims that, once established, precedents are treated by listeners...

Data from: The oldest actinopterygian highlights the cryptic early history of the hyperdiverse ray-finned fishes

Jing Lu, Sam Giles, Matt Friedman, Jan L. Den Blaauwen & Min Zhu
Osteichthyans comprise two divisions, each containing over 32,000 living species: Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods) and Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes). Recent discoveries from China highlight the morphological disparity of early sarcopterygians and extend their origin into the late Silurian. By contrast, the oldest unambiguous actinopterygians are roughly 30 million years younger, leaving a long temporal gap populated by fragments and rare body fossils of controversial phylogenetic placement. Here we reinvestigate the enigmatic osteichthyan Meemannia from the...

Data from: Seven common mistakes in population genetics and how to avoid them

Patrick Meirmans & Patrick G. Meirmans
As the data resulting from modern genotyping tools are astoundingly complex, genotyping studies require great care in the sampling design, genotyping, data analysis and interpretation. Such care is necessary because, with data sets containing thousands of loci, small biases can easily become strongly significant patterns. Such biases may already be present in routine tasks that are present in almost every genotyping study. Here, I discuss seven common mistakes that can be frequently encountered in the...

Data from: Active prey mixing as an explanation for polyphagy in predatory arthropods: synergistic dietary effects on egg production despite a behavioural cost

Renata Vieira Marques, Renato Almeida Sarmento, Felipe Lemos, Marçal Pedro-Neto, Maurice W. Sabelis, Madelaine Venzon, Angelo Pallini & Arne Janssen
1.Mixing of prey that differ in nutrient content or toxic compounds (dietary mixing) may allow synovigenic predatory arthropods to balance their diet or dilute toxins of different prey items to maximize performance: dietary mixing may therefore explain the prevalence of polyphagy in this functional group. 2.Several predatory arthropods can redress nutritional imbalances in their diet by actively mixing different diets, based on experiments with artificial diets or with prey that were manipulated to contain different...

Data from: Modelling flight heights of lesser black-backed gulls and great skuas from GPS: a Bayesian approach

Viola H. Ross-Smith, Chris B. Thaxter, Elizabeth A. Masden, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Niall H. K. Burton, Lucy J. Wright, Mark M. Rehfisch & Alison Johnston
Wind energy generation is increasing globally, and associated environmental impacts must be considered. The risk of seabirds colliding with offshore wind turbines is influenced by flight height, and flight height data usually come from observers on boats, making estimates in daylight in fine weather. GPS tracking provides an alternative and generates flight height information in a range of conditions, but the raw data have associated error. Here, we present a novel analytical solution for accommodating...

Data from: Historical colonization and dispersal limitation supplement climate and topography in shaping species richness of African lizards (Reptilia: Agaminae)

W. Daniel Kissling, Anne Blach-Overgaard, Roelof E. Zwaan & Philipp Wagner
To what extent deep-time dispersal limitation shapes present-day biodiversity at broad spatial scales remains elusive. Here, we compiled a continental dataset on the distributions of African lizard species in the reptile subfamily Agaminae (a relatively young, Neogene radiation of agamid lizards which ancestors colonized Africa from the Arabian peninsula) and tested to what extent historical colonization and dispersal limitation (i.e. accessibility from areas of geographic origin) can explain present-day species richness relative to current climate,...

Plant dispersal strategies of high tropical alpine communities across the Andes

Carolina Tovar, Inga Melcher, Buntarou Kusumoto, Francisco Cuesta, Antoine Cleef, Rosa Isela Meneses, Stephan Halloy, Luis Daniel Llambi, Stephan Beck, Priscilla Muriel, Ricardo Jaramillo, Jorge Jacome & Julieta Carilla
• Dispersal is a key ecological process that influences plant community assembly. Therefore, understanding whether dispersal strategies are associated with climate is of utmost importance, particularly in areas greatly exposed to climate change. We examined alpine plant communities located in the mountain summits of the tropical Andes across a 4000 km latitudinal gradient. We investigated species dispersal strategies and tested their association with climatic conditions and their evolutionary history. • We used dispersal-related traits (dispersal...

Beyond the group: how food, mates and group size influence inter-group encounters in wild bonobos

Stefano Lucchesi, Leveda Cheng, Karline Janmaat, Roger Mundry, Anne Pisor & Surbeck Martin
In social-living animals, interactions between groups are frequently agonistic, but they can also be tolerant and even cooperative. Inter-group tolerance and cooperation are regarded as a crucial step in the formation of highly-structured multilevel societies. Behavioral ecological theory suggests that inter-group tolerance and cooperation can emerge either when the costs of hostility outweigh the benefits of exclusive resource access, or when both groups gain fitness benefits through their interactions. However, the factors promoting inter-group tolerance...

Data from: Projecting consequences of global warming for the functional diversity of fleshy-fruited plants and frugivorous birds along a tropical elevational gradient

Larissa Nowak, W. Daniel Kissling, Irene M. A. Bender, D. Matthias Dehling, Till Töpfer, Katrin Böhning-Gaese & Matthias Schleuning
Aim: Species in ecological communities are linked by biotic interactions. It is therefore important to simultaneously study the impacts of global warming on interdependent taxa from different trophic levels. Here, we quantify current and potential future associations of functional diversity (based on multiple traits) and functional identity (based on individual traits) between interacting taxa using projection models under climate change. Location: A tropical elevational gradient (500–3500 m a.s.l.) in the Manú biosphere reserve, southeast Peru...

Shorebird feeding specialists differ in how environmental conditions alter their foraging time

Henk-Jan Van Der Kolk, Bruno J. Ens, Kees Oosterbeek, Willem Bouten, Andrew M. Allen, Magali Frauendorf, Thomas K. Lameris, Thijs Oosterbeek, Symen Deuzeman, Kelly De Vries, Eelke Jongejans & Martijn Van De Pol
Feeding specialisation is a common cause of individual variation. Fitness payoffs of specialisation vary with environmental conditions, but the underlying behavioural mechanisms are poorly understood. Such mechanistic knowledge, however, is crucial to reliably predict responses of heterogeneous populations to environmental change. We quantified spatiotemporal allocation of foraging behaviour in wintering Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus), a species in which feeding specialisation can be inferred from bill shape. We combined GPS and accelerometer data to quantify foraging...

Data from: Human occupation and ecosystem change on Upolu (Samoa) during the Holocene

William Gosling, David Sear, Jonathan Hassall, Pete Langdon, Mick Bönnen, Tessa Driessen, Zoë Van Kemenada, Kevin Noort, Melanie Leng, Ian Croudace, Anna Bourne & Crystal McMichael
Aim To track the peopling of the South Pacific and assess their impact on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Location Upolu, Samoa. Taxon Ancient charcoal, pollen, sprores, algae and cyanobacteria types are recorded. Methods A sedimentary record covering the last c. 10,500 years was recovered from the volcanic crater that contains Lake Lanoto'o near the centre of Upolu Island. Information on past ecological change was obtained from microscopic and macroscopic remains extracted from the sediments: charcoal...

Data from: Aeroecology meets aviation safety: early warning systems in Europe and the Middle East prevent collisions between birds and aircraft

Hans Van Gasteren, Karen L. Krijgsveld, Nadine Klauke, Yossi Leshem, Isabel C. Metz, Michal Skakuj, Serge Sorbi, Inbal Schekler & Judy Shamoun-Baranes
The aerosphere is utilized by billions of birds, moving for different reasons and from short to great distances spanning tens of thousands of kilometres. The aerosphere, however, is also utilized by aviation which leads to increasing conflicts in and around airfields as well as en-route. Collisions between birds and aircraft cost billions of euros annually and, in some cases, result in the loss of human lives. Simultaneously, aviation has diverse negative impacts on wildlife. During...

Data from: Functional biogeography of dietary strategies in birds

Jean-Yves Barnagaud, Nathan Mazet, François Munoz, Matthias Grenié, Pierre Denelle, Mar Sobral, W. Daniel Kissling, Çağan H. Sekercioglu & Cyrille Violle
Aim: Diet is key to understanding species’ resource use, relationships with their environment and biotic interactions. We aimed to identify the major strategies that shape birds’ diet space, and to investigate their spatial distributions in association with biogeographic, bioclimatic and anthropogenic drivers. Location: Global Time period: Current Major taxa studied: Birds Methods: We analysed score-based assessments of eight diet categories for 8937 out of 10964 extant bird species. We constructed a multivariate diet space by...

Data from: No signal of deleterious mutation accumulation in conserved gene sequences of extant asexual hexapods

Alexander Brandt, Jens Bast, Stefan Scheu, Karen Meusemann, Alexander Donath, Kai Schütte, Ryuichiro Machida & Ken Kraaijeveld
Loss of sex and recombination is generally assumed to impede the effectiveness of purifying selection and to result in the accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations. Empirical evidence for this has come from several studies investigating mutational load in a small number of individual genes. However, recent whole transcriptome based studies have yielded inconsistent results, hence questioning the validity of the assumption of mutational meltdown in asexual populations. Here, we study the effectiveness of purifying selection...

Data and code for: Past and future extinctions shape the body size - fruit size relationship between palms and mammalian frugivores

Jun Ying Lim, Jens-Christian Svenning, Bastian Göldel, Søren Faurby & W. Daniel Kissling
The dispersal of seeds by mammalian frugivores influences the structure and composition of plant communities, but most ecosystems have undergone defaunation over thousands of years, a process that continues today. Understanding how past defaunation has affected fruit-frugivore interactions will thus provide insights into how ecosystems may respond to future frugivore loss. By integrating palm and mammalian frugivore trait and occurrence data worldwide, we reveal a global positive relationship between fruit size and body size of...

The brains of elite soccer players are subject to experience-dependent alterations in white matter connectivity

Zai-Fu Yao
Soccer is the only major sport with voluntary unprotected head-to-ball contact. It is crucial to determine if head impact through regular soccer sports training is manifested in brain structure and connectivity, and whether such alterations are due to sustained training per se. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we documented a comprehensive view of soccer players’ brains in a sample of twenty-five right-handed male elite soccer players aged from 18 to 22 years and twenty-five non-athletic controls...

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Affiliations

  • University of Amsterdam
    154
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
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  • Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University
    9
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan
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  • SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow
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  • Aarhus University
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  • NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
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  • Lockheed Martin Solar & Astrophysics Laboratory
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