26 Works

Associated evolution of fruit size, fruit color and spines in Neotropical palms

Lucas Ferreira Do Nascimento, , Renske E. Onstein, W. Daniel Kissling & Mathias M. Pires
Understanding how ecological interactions have shaped the evolutionary dynamics of species traits remains a challenge in evolutionary ecology. Combining trait evolution models and phylogenies, we analyzed the evolution of characters associated with seed dispersal (fruit size and color) and herbivory (spines) in Neotropical palms to infer the role of these opposing animal-plant interactions in driving evolutionary patterns. We found that the evolution of fruit color and fruit size were associated in Neotropical palms, supporting the...

Modelling the distribution of Amazonian tree species in response to long-term climate change during the mid-late Holocene

Vitor Gomes, Francis Mayle, William Gosling, Ima Vieira, Rafael Salomão & Hans Ter Steege
Aim: To (a) assess the environmental suitability for rainforest tree species of Moraceae and Urticaceae across Amazonia during the Mid-Late Holocene and (b) determine the extent to which their distributions increased in response to long-term climate change over this period. Location: Amazonia. Methods: We used MaxEnt and inverse distance weighting interpolation to produce environmental suitability and relative abundance models at 0.5-degree resolution for tree species of Moraceae and Urticaceae, based on natural history collections and...

Winds at departure shape seasonal patterns of nocturnal bird migration over the North Sea

Maja Bradarić, Willem Bouten, Ruben Fijn, Karen Krijgsveld & Judy Shamoun-Baranes
On their migratory journeys, terrestrial birds can come across large inhospitable areas with limited opportunities to rest and refuel. Flight over these areas poses a risk especially when wind conditions en route are adverse, in which case inhospitable areas can act as an ecological barrier for terrestrial migrants. Thus, within the East-Atlantic flyway, the North Sea can function as an ecological barrier. The main aim of this study was to shed light on seasonal patterns...

Data from: Integration and harmonization of trait data from plant individuals across heterogeneous sources

Tim P. Lenters, Andrew Henderson, Caroline M. Dracxler, Guilherme A. Elias, Suzanne Mogue Kamga, Thomas L. P. Couvreur & W. Daniel Kissling
Trait data represent the basis for ecological and evolutionary research and have relevance for biodiversity conservation, ecosystem management and earth system modelling. The collection and mobilization of trait data has strongly increased over the last decade, but many trait databases still provide only species-level, aggregated trait values (e.g. ranges, means) and lack the direct observations on which those data are based. Thus, the vast majority of trait data measured directly from individuals remains hidden and...

Quantifying thermal exposure for migratory riverine species: phenology of Chinook salmon populations predicts thermal stress

Alyssa FitzGerald, Sara John, Travis Apgar, Nathan Mantua & Benjamin Martin
Migratory species are particularly vulnerable to climate change because habitat throughout their entire migration cycle must be suitable for the species to persist. For migratory species in rivers, predicting climate change impacts is especially difficult because there is a lack of spatially-continuous and seasonally-varying stream temperature data, habitat conditions can vary for an individual throughout its life cycle, and vulnerability can vary by life stage and season. To predict thermal impacts on migratory riverine populations,...

Apparent breeding success drives long-term population dynamics of a migratory swan

Rascha Nuijten, Stefan Vriend, Kevin Wood, Trinus Haitjema, Eileen Rees, Eelke Jongejans & Bart Nolet
The ability of a species to adapt to environmental change is ultimately reflected in its vital rates – i.e., survival and reproductive success of individuals. Together, vital rates determine trends in numbers, commonly monitored using counts of species abundance. Rapid changes in abundance can give rise to concern, leading to calls for research into the biological mechanisms underlying variations in demography. For the NW European population of Bewick’s swan (Cygnus columbianus bewickii), there have been...

Data from: Tetranychus evansi spider mite populations suppress tomato defences to varying degrees

Bram Knegt, Tomas Meijer, Merijn Kant, E. Toby Kiers & Martijn Egas
Plant defence suppression is an offensive strategy of herbivores, in which they manipulate plant physiological processes to increase their performance. Paradoxically, defence suppression does not always benefit the defence-suppressing herbivores, because lowered plant defences can also enhance the performance of competing herbivores and can expose herbivores to increased predation. Suppression of plant defence may therefore entail considerable ecological costs depending on the presence of competitors and natural enemies in a community. Hence, we hypothesize that...

Data from: A life-history perspective on sexual selection in a polygamous species

Astrid T Groot, Ke Gao, Michiel Van Wijk, Martijn Egas & Zoe Clement
Background: Ever since Darwin, evolutionary biologists have studied sexual selection driving differences in appearance and behaviour between males and females. An unchallenged paradigm in such studies is that one sex (usually the male) signals its quality as a mate to the other sex (usually the female), who is choosy in accepting a partner. Here, we hypothesize that in polygamous species these roles change dynamically with the mating status of males and females, depending on direct...

Identifying drivers of forest resilience in long-term records from the Neotropics

Carole Adolf, Carolina Tovar, Nicola Kühn, Hermann Behling, Juan Carlos Berrío, Gabriela Dominguez-Vázquez, Blanca Figueroa-Rangel, Zaire Gonzalez-Carranza, Gerald Alexander Islebe, Henry Hooghiemstra, Hector Neff, Miguel Olvera-Vargas, Bronwen Whitney, Matthew J. Wooller & Kathy J. Willis
Here we use 30 long-term, high-resolution palaeoecological records from Mexico, Central and South America to address two hypotheses regarding possible drivers of resilience in tropical forests as measured in terms of recovery rates from previous disturbances. First, we hypothesise that faster recovery rates are associated with regions of higher biodiversity, as suggested by the insurance hypothesis. And second, that resilience is due to intrinsic abiotic factors that are location specific, thus regions presently displaying resilience...

We Are Right, They Are Wrong

Michael Hameleers
Populism maintains a specific relationship with discourses of (un)truthfulness. Yet, although a growing body of research has explored the nature and effects of populist rhetoric, populism’s cultivation of reality and dishonesty has been under-theorized. In this paper, we explore three relationships between populism and (un)truthfulness: (1) the cultivation of a conspiracy theory in populist discourse; (2) populism’s denial or discrediting of expert knowledge or empirical information, and the legitimacy of journalism and mainstream sources of...

Grey Literature Survey 2004: A research project tracking developments in the field of grey literature

Albert Boekhorst, Dominic Farace & Jerry Frantzen
Last December, at GL5 in Amsterdam, many of the authors and researchers reiterated the Luxembourg Convention on grey literature. Some questioned if it were not time to rethink the definition, some offered moderations, but not one called for its complete elimination or abolition. During the course of the authors’ presentations, specific attributes of grey were brought to lively discussion and debate. However, time and circumstance being known limitations on this kind of interaction and communication,...

Access to Grey Content: An Analysis of Grey Literature based on Citation and Survey Data: A Follow-up Study

Dominic Farace, Jerry Frantzen & Albert Boekhorst
Co-authored together with Jerry Frantzen, Albert Boekhorst, Joachim Schöpfel, and Christine Stock. Grey literature, an area of interest to special librarians and information professionals, can be traced back a half-century. However, grey literature as a specialized field in information studies is less than a decade old. At GL’97 in Luxembourg, grey literature was redefined “as information produced on all levels of government, academics, business and industry in electronic and print formats not controlled by commercial...

Change in terrestrial human footprint drives continued loss of intact ecosystems

Brooke Williams, Oscar Venter, James Allan, Scott Atkinson, Jose Rehbein, Michelle Ward, Moreno Di Marco, Hedley Grantham, Jamison Ervin, Scott Goetz, Andrew Hansen, Patrick Jantz, Rajeev Pillay, Susana Rodríguez-Buriticá, Christina Supples, Anne Virnig & James Watson
Human pressure mapping is important for understanding humanity's role in shaping Earth’s patterns and processes. Our ability to map this influence has evolved, thanks to powerful computing, earth observing satellites, and new bottom-up census and crowd-sourced data. Here, we provide the latest temporally inter-comparable maps of the terrestrial human footprint, and assessment of change in human pressure at global, biome, and ecoregional scales. In 2013, 42% of terrestrial Earth could be considered relatively free of...

Single-cell visualization indicates direct role of sponge host in uptake of dissolved organic matter

Michelle Achlatis, Mathieu Pernice, Kathryn Green, Jasper De Goeij, Paul Guagliardo, Matt Kilburn, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg & Sophie Dove
Marine sponges are set to become more abundant in many near-future oligotrophic environments, where they play crucial roles in nutrient cycling. Of high importance is their mass turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM), a heterogeneous mixture that constitutes the largest fraction of organic matter in the ocean and is recycled primarily by bacterial mediation. Little is known however about the mechanism that enables sponges to incorporate large quantities of DOM in their nutrition, unlike most...

Data from: Cascading effects of climate variability on the breeding success of an edge population of an apex predator

Laura Gangoso, Duarte Viana, Adriaan Dokter, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Jordi Figuerola, Sergio Barbosa & Willem Bouten
1. Large-scale environmental forces can influence biodiversity at different levels of biological organization. Climate, in particular, is often associated to species distributions and diversity gradients. However, its mechanistic link to population dynamics is still poorly understood. 2. Here, we unraveled the full mechanistic path by which a climatic driver, the Atlantic trade winds, determines the viability of a bird population. 3. We monitored the breeding population of Eleonora’s falcons in the Canary Islands for over...

Scale-dependent drivers of the phylogenetic structure and similarity of tree communities in northwestern Amazonia

Sebastián González-Caro, Joost Duivenvoorden, Henrik Balslev, Jaime Cavelier, Carlos Grández, Manuel Macia, Hugo Romero-Saltos, Mauricio Sanchez, Renato Valencia & Alvaro Duque
1. The extent to which historical dispersal, environmental features and geographic barriers shape the phylogenetic structure and turnover of tree communities in northwestern Amazonia at multiple spatial scales remains poorly understood. 2. We used 85 floristically standardized 0.1-ha plots (DBH ³ 2.5 cm) distributed in three subregions of northwestern (NW) Amazonia across three main habitat types (floodplain, swamp, terra firme forests), to hypothesize that: i) historical dispersal overcome geographical barriers, which meant low local phylogenetic...

Palm fruit colours are linked to the broad-scale distribution and diversification of primate colour vision systems

Renske Onstein, Daphne Vink, Jorin Veen, Christopher Barratt, Suzette Flantua, Serge Wich & Daniel Kissling
A long-standing hypothesis in ecology and evolution is that trichromatic colour vision (the ability to distinguish red from green) in frugivorous primates has evolved as an adaptation to detect conspicuous (reddish) fruits. This could provide a competitive advantage over dichromatic frugivores which cannot distinguish reddish colours from a background of green foliage. Here, we test whether the origin, distribution and diversity of trichromatic primates is positively associated with the availability of conspicuous palm fruits, i.e....

Data from: Deconstructing species richness–environment relationships in Neotropical lianas

Leila Meyer, W. Daniel Kissling, Lucia G. Lohmann, Joaquín Hortal & José A. F. Diniz-Filho
Abstract Aim: Studying species richness patterns by considering all species as equivalent units may prevent a deeper understanding of the origin and maintenance of biodiversity. Here, we deconstructed the species richness of Neotropical lianas by specific attributes of species to study richness–environment relationships. Location: Neotropics Taxon: Tribe Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae), the largest clade of Neotropical lianas Methods: We used five morphological, one geographical and two evolutionary attributes of species, each with 2–7 attribute states. We compared...

Plant dispersal strategies of high tropical alpine communities across the Andes

Carolina Tovar, Inga Melcher, Buntarou Kusumoto, Francisco Cuesta, Antoine Cleef, Rosa Isela Meneses, Stephan Halloy, Luis Daniel Llambi, Stephan Beck, Priscilla Muriel, Ricardo Jaramillo, Jorge Jacome & Julieta Carilla
• Dispersal is a key ecological process that influences plant community assembly. Therefore, understanding whether dispersal strategies are associated with climate is of utmost importance, particularly in areas greatly exposed to climate change. We examined alpine plant communities located in the mountain summits of the tropical Andes across a 4000 km latitudinal gradient. We investigated species dispersal strategies and tested their association with climatic conditions and their evolutionary history. • We used dispersal-related traits (dispersal...

Data from: Human occupation and ecosystem change on Upolu (Samoa) during the Holocene

William Gosling, David Sear, Jonathan Hassall, Pete Langdon, Mick Bönnen, Tessa Driessen, Zoë Van Kemenada, Kevin Noort, Melanie Leng, Ian Croudace, Anna Bourne & Crystal McMichael
Aim To track the peopling of the South Pacific and assess their impact on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Location Upolu, Samoa. Taxon Ancient charcoal, pollen, sprores, algae and cyanobacteria types are recorded. Methods A sedimentary record covering the last c. 10,500 years was recovered from the volcanic crater that contains Lake Lanoto'o near the centre of Upolu Island. Information on past ecological change was obtained from microscopic and macroscopic remains extracted from the sediments: charcoal...

Data and code for: Past and future extinctions shape the body size - fruit size relationship between palms and mammalian frugivores

Jun Ying Lim, Jens-Christian Svenning, Bastian Göldel, Søren Faurby & W. Daniel Kissling
The dispersal of seeds by mammalian frugivores influences the structure and composition of plant communities, but most ecosystems have undergone defaunation over thousands of years, a process that continues today. Understanding how past defaunation has affected fruit-frugivore interactions will thus provide insights into how ecosystems may respond to future frugivore loss. By integrating palm and mammalian frugivore trait and occurrence data worldwide, we reveal a global positive relationship between fruit size and body size of...

The brains of elite soccer players are subject to experience-dependent alterations in white matter connectivity

Zai-Fu Yao
Soccer is the only major sport with voluntary unprotected head-to-ball contact. It is crucial to determine if head impact through regular soccer sports training is manifested in brain structure and connectivity, and whether such alterations are due to sustained training per se. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we documented a comprehensive view of soccer players’ brains in a sample of twenty-five right-handed male elite soccer players aged from 18 to 22 years and twenty-five non-athletic controls...

Data from: Long-term ecological legacies in western Amazonia

Christine Åkesson, Crystal McMichael, Marco Raczka, Seringe Huisman, Johnny Vogel, Mona Palmeira, David Neill, Jason Veizaj & Mark Bush
1. Modifications of Amazonian forests by pre-Columbian peoples are thought to have left ecological legacies that have persisted to the modern day. Most Amazonian palaeoecological records do not, however, provide the required temporal resolution to document the nuanced changes of pre-Columbian disturbance or post-disturbance succession and recovery, making it difficult to detect any direct, or indirect, ecological legacies on tree species. 2. Here, we investigate the fossil pollen, phytolith, and charcoal history of Lake Kumpaka,...

Data from: A predictive model for improving placement of wind turbines to minimise collision risk potential for a large soaring raptor

Megan Murgatroyd, Willem Bouten & Arjun Amar
1. With the rapid growth of wind energy developments worldwide, it is critical that the negative impacts on wildlife are considered and mitigated. This includes minimising the numbers of large soaring raptors which are killed when they collide with wind turbines. 2. To reduce the likelihood of raptor collisions, turbines should be placed at locations which are least used by sensitive species. For resident or breeding species, this is often delineated crudely through the use...

Data from: Nocturnal foraging lifts time-constraints in winter for migratory geese but hardly speeds up fueling

Thomas Lameris, Adriaan Dokter, Henk Van Der Jeugd, Willem Bouten, Jasper Koster, Stefan Sand, Coen Westerduin & Bart Nolet
Climate warming advances the optimal timing of breeding for many animals. For migrants to start breeding earlier, a concurrent advancement of migration is required, including pre-migratory fueling of energy reserves. We investigate whether barnacle geese are time-constrained during pre-migratory fueling and whether there is potential to advance or shorten the fueling period to allow an earlier migratory departure. We equipped barnacle geese with GPS-trackers and accelerometers to remotely record birds’ behavior, from which we calculated...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    26

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23
  • Text
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Amsterdam
    26
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    3
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • Netherlands Institute of Ecology
    2
  • GreyNet International
    2
  • Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador
    2
  • University of Sao Paulo
    2
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1