25 Works

'Most' vs 'More Than Half': An Alternatives Explanation

Fausto Carcassi & Jakub Szymanik

Expanding the Horizon of Grey Literature

John Mackenzie Owen
Grey literature - loosely defined as information distributed directly by its creator - is gaining importance due to the development of digital information networks. Individuals and organizations are using these networks, making vast amounts of information available on a global scale. The role and added value of traditional publishers and libraries is being questioned. Some argue that grey literature will become more important than published literature; others disagree. During the Third International Conference on Grey...

Hibiscus harlequin bug developmental, weight, and iridescence data

Emily Burdfield-Steel & Darrell Kemp
Despite the fact their colouration functions as an aposematic signal, and is thus expected to be under purifying selection, Hibiscus harlequin bugs (Tectocoris diophthalmus) show an impressive level of variation in their iridescent colouration both within and between populations. Previous work has shown that part of this variation may be due to plasticity in response to temperature. However, populations vary both in the extent of plasticity, and in the distribution of different colour patterns, suggesting...

Cyclical Behavior of Debt and Equity Using a Panel of Canadian Firms

Francisco Covas & Wouter J. Den Haan
We document the cyclical behavior of debt, equity, and retained earnings for different firm categories using firm-level Canadian data. There is evidence of both procyclical equity and debt issuance for all firm categories but the timing differs. In particular, there is strong evidence that equity issuance increases in anticipation of an expansion. During this phase, some substitution between debt and equity takes place. After the expansion has reached its peak, equity issuance starts to decrease...

Climate change reshapes the eco-evolutionary dynamics of a Neotropical seed dispersal system

Lilian Sales, W. Daniel Kissling, Mauro Galetti, Babak Naimi & Mathias Pires
Aim: Global changes will redistribute biodiversity, reshaping ecological interactions and ecosystem processes. The distribution decoupling of plants and their mutualistic seed dispersers, for instance, may have overlooked eco-evolutionary effects. How animal-dispersed plants will respond to changes in the distribution of their seed dispersers is, however, an open question. Here, we forecast the consequences of climate change and frugivory interactions for the spatial distribution and seed size evolution of a Neotropical palm. Location: Atlantic forests of...

On the scaling and standardization of charcoal data in paleofire reconstructions

Crystal McMichael, Britte Heijink, Mark Bush & William Gosling
Understanding the biogeography of past and present fire events is particularly important in tropical forest ecosystems, where fire rarely occurs in the absence of human ignition. Open science databases have facilitated comprehensive and synthetic analyses of past fire activity, but charcoal datasets must be standardized (scaled) because of variations in measurement strategy, sediment type, and catchment size. Here, we: i) assess how commonly used metrics of charcoal scaling perform on datasets from tropical forests; ii)...

Data from: Experimental evidence for neonicotinoid driven decline in aquatic emerging insects

S. Henrik Barmentlo, Maarten Schrama, Geert R. De Snoo, Peter M. Van Bodegom, André Van Nieuwenhuijzen & Martina G. Vijver
There is an ongoing unprecedented loss in insects, both in terms of richness and biomass. The usage of pesticides, especially neonicotinoid insecticides, has been widely suggested to be a contributor to this decline. However, the risks of neonicotinoids to natural insect populations have remained largely unknown due to lack of field-realistic experiments. Here, we used an outdoor experiment to determine effects of field-realistic concentrations of the commonly applied neonicotinoid thiacloprid on the emergence of naturally...

Online Support and Online Assessment for Teaching and Learning Chemistry

Claire McDonnell & Natasa Brouwer

Idiap Poster Data

Hayley Hung & Ben Kröse
The Idiap Poster Data consists of images extracted from 6 hours of videos shot during a poster session.

The COVID-19 Consumption Game-Changer: Evidence from a Large-Scale Multi-Country Survey

Alexander Hodbod, Cars Hommes, Stefanie J. Huber & isabelle salle
Prospective economic developments depend on the behavior of consumer spending. A key question is whether private expenditures recover once social distancing restrictions are lifted or whether the COVID-19 crisis had a sustained impact on consumer confidence, preferences, and hence, spending. The elongated and profound experience of the COVID-19 crisis may durably affect consumer preferences. We conducted a representative consumer survey in five European countries in summer 2020 after the release of the first wave’s lockdown...

The Cenozoic history of palms: Global diversification, biogeography, and the decline of megathermal forests

Jun Ying Lim, Huasheng Huang, Alexander Farnsworth, Daniel Lunt, William Baker, Robert Morley, W. Daniel Kissling & Carina Hoorn
Aim: Megathermal rainforests and mangroves are much smaller in extent today than in the early Cenozoic, primarily due to global cooling and drying trends since the Eocene--Oligocene Transition (~ 34 Ma). The general reduction of these biomes is hypothesized to shape the diversity and biogeographic history of tropical plant clades. However, this has rarely been examined due to a paucity of good fossil records of tropical taxa and the difficulty in assigning them to modern...

Bird strikes at commercial airports explained by citizen science and weather radar data

Cecilia Nilsson, Frank La Sorte, Adriaan Dokter, Kyle Horton, Benjamin Van Doren, Jeffrey Kolodzinski, Judy Shamoun-Baranes & Andrew Farnsworth
1. Aircraft collisions with birds span the entire history of human aviation, including fatal collisions during some of the first powered human flights. Much effort has been expended to reduce such collisions, but increased knowledge about bird movements and species occurrence could dramatically improve decision support and proactive measures to reduce them. Migratory movements of birds pose a unique, often overlooked, threat to aviation that is particularly difficult for individual airports to monitor and predict:...

Data and code for: Identifying fine-scale habitat preferences of threatened butterflies using airborne laser scanning

Jan Peter Reinier De Vries, Zsófia Koma, Michiel F. WallisDeVries & W. Daniel Kissling
Aim: Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) is a promising remote sensing technique for ecological applications because it can quantify vegetation structure at high resolution over broad spatial extents. Using country-wide airborne laser scanning (ALS) data, we test to what extent fine-scale LiDAR metrics capturing low vegetation, medium-to-high vegetation and landscape-scale habitat structures can explain the habitat preferences of threatened butterflies at a national extent. Location: The Netherlands. Methods: We applied a machine learning (random forest)...

Energetic constraints imposed on trophic interaction strengths enhance resilience in empirical and model food webs

Xiaoxiao Li, Wei Yang, Ursula Gaedke & Peter De Ruiter
1. Food web stability and resilience are at the heart of understanding the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Previous studies show that models of empirical food webs are substantially more stable than random ones, due to a few strong interactions embedded in a majority of weak interactions. Analyses of trophic interaction loops show that in empirical food webs the patterns in the interaction strengths prevent the occurrence of destabilizing heavy loops and thereby enhances resilience....

Data from: Ecological and evolutionary significance of primates’ most consumed plant families

Jun Ying Lim, Michael D. Wasserman, Jorin Veen, Marie-Lynne Despres-Einspenner & W. Daniel Kissling
Angiosperms have been essential components of primate diet for millions of years, but the relative importance of different angiosperm families in primate diets and their influence on primate evolution and ecology remains unclear. Here, we assess the contribution and ecological and evolutionary significance of plant families to the diets of wild primates based on an unprecedented dietary dataset of over 8,000 dietary records, compiled from 140 primary sources encompassing 109 primate species. Out of the...

Servant Leadership, Third-Party Behavior, and Emotional Exhaustion of Followers

Innocentina-Marie Obi, Katalien Bollen, Hillie Aaldering, Wouter Robijn & Martin Euwema

From the Field to the Laboratory: The Theory-Practice Research of Peter J. Carnevale

Linda Putnam, Mara Olekalns, Donald Conlon & Carsten De Dreu

Value and use of grey literature: the implications of networked publishing

John Mackenzie Owen
The value of grey literature (GL) has often been regarded as secondary to that of officially published documents. But digital information networks provide an opportunity for GL to become the most important type of electronic publication. The concept of `GL' itself will disappear as it evolves into a new concept of networked organizational publishing. This development will greatly increase the value of GL and lead to qualitative and quantitative changes in its use. This paper...

Data from: Why time-limited individuals can make populations more vulnerable to disturbance

Henk-Jan Van Der Kolk, Bruno Ens, Magali Frauendorf, Eelke Jongejans, Kees Oosterbeek, Willem Bouten & Martijn Van De Pol
Individual variation in disturbance vulnerability (i.e. the likelihood that disturbance negatively affects an individual’s fitness) can affect how disturbance impacts animal populations, as even at low disturbance levels some individuals could be severely affected and die. Individual variation in vulnerability can arise due to different responses to disturbance. We propose a new hypothesis that even when individuals respond similarly to disturbance, time-limited individuals are more at risk that their condition deteriorates since they have limited...

Data for: Sex pheromone signal and stability covary with fitness

Thomas Blankers, Rik Lievers, Michiel Van Wijk & Astrid Groot
If sexual signals are costly, covariance between signal expression and fitness is expected. Signal-fitness covariance is important, because it can contribute to the maintenance of genetic variation in signals that are under natural or sexual selection. Chemical signals, such as female sex pheromones in moths, have traditionally been assumed to be species-recognition signals, but their relationship with fitness is unclear. Here we test whether chemical, conspecific mate finding signals covary with fitness in the moth...

Physical and biological constraints on the capacity for life-history expression of anadromous salmonids: an Eel River, California, case study

Alyssa FitzGerald, David Boughton, Joshua Fuller, Sara John, Benjamin Martin, Lee Harrison & Nathan Mantua
Recovery of anadromous salmonid populations is complicated by the fact that these fish have complex life-histories. Habitat valuation and capacity methods need to account for spatiotemporal variability in temperature, geomorphic features, and a species’ thermal sensitivity mediated by biological interactions. We examined this interplay in a case study of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Chinook Salmon (O. tshawytscha) in California’s Eel River watershed. We estimated habitat suitability and fish capacity for each salmonid run and...

Subcellular view of host–microbiome nutrient exchange in sponges: insights into the ecological success of an early metazoan–microbe symbiosis

Meggie Hudspith, Laura Rix, Michelle Achlatis, Jeremy Bougoure, Paul Guagliardo, Peta L. Clode, Nicole S. Webster, Gerard Muyzer, Mathieu Pernice & Jasper M. De Goeij
Background: Sponges are increasingly recognised as key ecosystem engineers in many aquatic habitats. They play an important role in nutrient cycling due to their unrivalled capacity for processing both dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) and the exceptional metabolic repertoire of their diverse and abundant microbial communities. Functional studies determining the role of host and microbiome in organic nutrient uptake and exchange, however, are limited. Therefore, we coupled pulse-chase isotopic tracer techniques with...

The role of deterministic succession during forest succession within a South African savanna

Samantha-Leigh Jamison-Daniels, Daniel Kissling, Monique Botha, Mathew Harris, Christopher Gordon & Michelle Greve
Bush encroachment can lead to a switch from open savannas to dense woodlands or forests. This has implications for both the composition of ecological communities and the provision of ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and grazing capacity. The patterns and underlying drivers responsible for bush encroachment are not fully understood. Here, we investigate the underlying determinants of bush clump formation (a form of encroachment) in a South African savanna and explore whether bush clump...

How melanism affects the sensitivity of lizards to climate change

Jonathan Goldenberg, Sebastian Mader, Federico Massetti, Karen Bisschop, Liliana D'Alba, Rampal S. Etienne, Susana Clusella Trullas & Matthew Shawkey
The impact of climate change on global biodiversity is firmly established, but the differential effect of climate change on populations within the same species is rarely considered. In ectotherms, melanism (i.e. darker integument due to heavier deposition of melanin) can significantly influence thermoregulation, as dark individuals generally heat more and faster than bright ones. Therefore, darker ectotherms might be more susceptible to climate change. Using the color-polyphenic lizard Karusasaurus polyzonus (Squamata: Cordylidae), we hypothesized that,...

Data from: The mutualism-antagonism continuum in Neotropical palm-frugivore interactions: from interaction outcomes to ecosystem dynamics

Caroline M. Dracxler & W. Daniel Kissling
Frugivory, i.e. feeding on fruits, pulp or seeds by animals, is usually considered a mutualism when interactions involve seed dispersal, and an antagonism when it results in the predation and destruction of seeds. Nevertheless, most frugivory interactions involve both benefits and disadvantages for plants, and the net interaction outcomes thus tend to vary along a continuum from mutualism to antagonism. Quantifying outcome variation is challenging and the ecological contribution of frugivorous animals to plant demography...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17
  • Text
    8

Affiliations

  • University of Amsterdam
    25
  • Bank of Canada
    2
  • European Central Bank
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1