503 Works

Using mosquito excreta to enhance mosquito-borne disease surveillance

Ana L. Ramírez

The impacts of microcredit on rural Vietnamese households

Chung Thanh Phan

Pornography's influence on men's sexual relationships and attitudes toward women

Daniel Miller

Housing the Homeless: housing crisis and caravan parks – a Bourdieusian perspective

Geraldine Mallinson

Modelling the drying kinetics of fresh-water and salt-water macroalgae

Craig Walker

From people to reefs: marine debris and plastic pollution in North Queensland

Anne Marie Bauer-Civiello

Nutrient recovery from source separated urine: modelling and experimental study

Leynard Natividad Marin

Microbial indicators for environmental stress and ecosystem health assessments

Bettina Glasl

Epidemiology and clinical presentations of seafood allergy in the Asia Pacific

Le Thi Kieu Thu

A grammar of Munya

Junwei Bai

Governing landscape transitions in Cambodia

Rebecca Anne Riggs

The giant Antamina deposit, Peru: intrusive sequence, skarn formation, and mineralisation

Stephanie A. Mrozek

INCREASING CORAL RESILIENCE TO BLEACHING THROUGH MICROBIOME MANIPULATION

Raquel Peixoto, Phillipe Rosado, Deborah Leite, Gustavo Duarte, Ricardo Chaloub, Guillaume Jospin, Jonathan Eisen, David Bourne, Ulisses Da Rocha, João Saraiva & Francisco Dini-Andreote
Although the early coral reef-bleaching warning system (NOAA/USA) is established, there is no feasible treatment that can minimize temperature bleaching and/or disease impacts on corals in the field. Here, we present the first attempts to extrapolate the widespread and well-established use of bacterial consortia to protect or improve health in other organisms (e.g., humans and plants) to corals. Manipulation of the coral-associated microbiome was facilitated through addition of a consortium of native (isolated from Pocillopora...

Sleep, watch, and extended cognition in Spenserian epic and Shakespearean drama

Stephanie Rhea Dawn Schierhuber

Data from: Amelioration of ocean acidification and warming effects through physiological buffering of a macroalgae

Steve Doo, Aero Leplastrier, Alexia Graba-Landry, Januar Harianto, Ross Coleman & Maria Byrne
Concurrent anthropogenic global climate change and ocean acidification is expected to have a negative impact on calcifying marine organisms. While knowledge of biological responses of organisms to oceanic stress has emerged from single species experiments, these do not capture ecologically relevant scenarios where the potential for multi-organism physiological interactions is assessed. Marine algae provide an interesting case study, as their photosynthetic activity elevates pH in the surrounding microenvironment, potentially buffering more acidic conditions for associated...

Data from: Gene expression correlates of social evolution in coral reef butterflyfishes

Jessica Nowicki, Morgan Pratchett, Stefan Walker, Darren Coker & Lauren O'Connell
Animals display remarkable variation in social behavior. However, outside of rodents, little is known about the neural mechanisms of social variation, and whether they are shared across species and sexes, limiting our understanding of how sociality evolves. Using coral reef butterflyfishes, we examined gene expression correlates of social variation (i.e., pair bonding vs. solitary living) within and between species and sexes. In several brain regions, we quantified gene expression of receptors important for social variation...

Data from: Natal philopatry increases relatedness within groups of coral reef cardinalfish

Theresa Rueger, Hugo Harrison, Peter Buston, Naomi Gardiner, Michael Berumen & Geoffrey Jones
A central issue in evolutionary ecology is how patterns of dispersal influence patterns of relatedness in populations. In terrestrial organisms, limited dispersal of offspring leads to groups of related individuals. In contrast, for most marine organisms, larval dispersal in open waters is thought to minimise kin associations within populations. However, recent molecular evidence and theoretical approaches have shown that limited dispersal, sibling cohesion, and/or differential reproductive success can lead to kin-association and elevated relatedness. Here,...

Data from: Long-term panmixia in a cosmopolitan Indo-Pacific coral reef fish and a nebulous genetic boundary with its broadly sympatric sister species

John B. Horne & Lynne Van Herwerden
Phylogeographical studies have shown that some shallow-water marine organisms, such as certain coral reef fishes, lack spatial population structure at oceanic scales, despite vast distances of pelagic habitat between reefs and other dispersal barriers. However, whether these dispersive widespread taxa constitute long-term panmictic populations across their species ranges remains unknown. Conventional phylogeographical inferences frequently fail to distinguish between long-term panmixia and metapopulations connected by gene flow. Moreover, marine organisms have notoriously large effective population sizes...

Data from: Phylogenetic diversity is a better measure of biodiversity than taxon counting

Joseph T. Miller, Garry Jolley-Rogers, Brent D. Mishler & Andrew H. Thornhill
Biodiversity is most commonly measured in taxonomic richness. For example, it is common to describe how diverse a genus or a geographic area is by counting the number of species within them. Phylogenetic diversity (PD), a measurement of the branch lengths in a phylogenetic tree, is a better measure of biodiversity that provides a comparable, evolutionary measure of biodiversity not possible with species counts. Despite its advantages, PD is rarely used as the primary measure...

Data from: Plant functional groups within a tropical forest exhibit different wood functional anatomy

Deborah M. G. Apgaua, David Y. P. Tng, Lucas A. Cernusak, Alexander W. Cheesman, Rubens M. Santos, Will J. Edwards & Susan G. W. Laurance
Understanding the anatomical basis of plant water transport in forest ecosystems is crucial for contextualizing community-level adaptations to drought, especially in life-form-rich tropical forests. To provide this context, we explored wood functional anatomy traits related to plant hydraulic architecture across different plant functional groups in a lowland tropical rain forest. We measured wood traits in 90 species from six functional groups (mature-phase, understorey and pioneer trees; understorey and pioneer shrubs; vines) and related these traits...

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