32 Works

INCREASING CORAL RESILIENCE TO BLEACHING THROUGH MICROBIOME MANIPULATION

Raquel Peixoto, Phillipe Rosado, Deborah Leite, Gustavo Duarte, Ricardo Chaloub, Guillaume Jospin, Jonathan Eisen, David Bourne, Ulisses Da Rocha, João Saraiva & Francisco Dini-Andreote
Although the early coral reef-bleaching warning system (NOAA/USA) is established, there is no feasible treatment that can minimize temperature bleaching and/or disease impacts on corals in the field. Here, we present the first attempts to extrapolate the widespread and well-established use of bacterial consortia to protect or improve health in other organisms (e.g., humans and plants) to corals. Manipulation of the coral-associated microbiome was facilitated through addition of a consortium of native (isolated from Pocillopora...

Data from: Phylogenetic diversity is a better measure of biodiversity than taxon counting

Joseph T. Miller, Garry Jolley-Rogers, Brent D. Mishler & Andrew H. Thornhill
Biodiversity is most commonly measured in taxonomic richness. For example, it is common to describe how diverse a genus or a geographic area is by counting the number of species within them. Phylogenetic diversity (PD), a measurement of the branch lengths in a phylogenetic tree, is a better measure of biodiversity that provides a comparable, evolutionary measure of biodiversity not possible with species counts. Despite its advantages, PD is rarely used as the primary measure...

Data from: Spatial dynamics and mixing of bluefin tuna in the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea revealed using next generation sequencing

Gregory Neils Puncher, Alessia Cariani, Gregory E. Maes, Jeroen Van Houdt, Koen Herten, Rita Cannas, Naiara Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Aitor Albaina, M. Andone Estonba, Molly Lutcavage, Alex Hanke, Jay Rooker, James S. Franks, Joseph M. Quattro, Gualtiero Basilone, Igaratza Fraile, Urtzi Laconcha, Nicolas Goñi, Ai Kimoto, A. David Macías, Francisco Alemany, Simeon Deguara, Salem W. Zgozi, Fulvio Garibaldi, Isik K. Oray … & Fausto Tinti
The Atlantic bluefin tuna is a highly migratory species emblematic of the challenges associated with shared fisheries management. In an effort to resolve the species’ stock dynamics, a genome-wide search for spatially informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was undertaken, by way of sequencing reduced representation libraries. An allele frequency approach to SNP discovery was used, combining the data of 555 larvae and young-of-the-year (LYOY) into pools representing major geographical areas and mapping against a newly...

Data from: Integrating complementary methods to improve diet analysis in fishery-targeted species

Jordan K. Matley, Gregory E. Maes, Floriaan Devloo-Delva, Roger Huerlimann, Gladys Chua, Andrew J. Tobin, Aaron T. Fisk, Colin A. Simpfendorfer & Michelle R. Heupel
Developing efficient, reliable, cost-effective ways to identify diet is required to understand trophic ecology in complex ecosystems and improve food web models. A combination of techniques, each varying in their ability to provide robust, spatially and temporally explicit information can be applied to clarify diet data for ecological research. This study applied an integrative analysis of a fishery-targeted species group - Plectropomus spp.in the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia by comparing three diet-identification approaches. Visual...

Data from: Potential of a no-take marine reserve to protect home ranges of anadromous brown trout (Salmo trutta)

Susanna H. Thorbjørnsen, Even Moland, Colin Simpfendorfer, Michelle Heupel, Halvor Knutsen & Esben M. Olsen
1. The extent to which no‐take marine reserves can benefit anadromous species requires examination. 2. Here, we used acoustic telemetry to investigate the spatial behavior of anadromous brown trout (sea trout, Salmo trutta) in relation to a small marine reserve(~1.5 km2) located inside a fjord on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. 3. On average, sea trout spent 42.3 % (±5.0% SE) of their time in the fjord within the reserve, a proportion similar to the area...

Data from: Trade-offs for butterfly alpha and beta diversity in human-modified landscapes and tropical rainforests

Hemchandranauth Sambhu, Alliea Nankishore, Stephen M. Turton & Tobin D. Northfield
The accelerating expansion of human populations and associated economic activity across the globe have made maintaining large, intact natural areas increasingly challenging. The difficulty of preserving large intact landscapes in the presence of growing human populations has led to a growing emphasis on landscape approaches to biodiversity conservation with a complementary strategy focused on improving conservation in human-modified landscapes. This, in turn, is leading to intense debate about the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation in human-modified...

Data from: Rare long-distance dispersal of a marine angiosperm across the Pacific Ocean

Timothy M. Smith, Paul H. York, Bernardo R. Broitman, Martin Thiel, Graeme C. Hays, Erik Van Sebille, Nathan F. Putman, Peter I. Macreadie & Craig D. H. Sherman
Aim: Long-distance dispersal (LDD) events occur rarely but play a fundamental role in shaping species biogeography. Lying at the heart of island biogeography theory, LDD relies on unusual events to facilitate colonisation of new habitats and range expansion. Despite the importance of LDD, it is inherently difficult to quantify due to the rarity of such events. We estimate the probability of LDD of the seagrass Heterozostera nigricaulis, a common Australian species, across the Pacific Ocean...

Data from: Australian house geckos are more aggressive than a globally successful invasive Asian house gecko

Adam Cisterne, Lin Schwarzkopf & David A. Pike
Invasive species are implicated in native species declines globally, but predicting the effect of specific invaders on a given native species remains difficult. Many successful invaders are highly aggressive, while others are not. The highly successful invasive Asian house gecko, Hemidactylus frenatus, has achieved a pan-tropical distribution. We investigated direct interactions between H. frenatus and a sympatric native Australian house gecko (Gehyra dubia) to determine the strength and nature of aggressive exclusion, and which species...

Data from: Latitudinal and seasonal variation in space use by a large, predatory reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus

Molly E. Scott, Michelle R. Heupel, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Jordan K. Matley & Morgan S. Pratchett
1. Temperature directly affects the metabolic rate and resource requirements of ectothermic animals, which is likely to influence their movement and habitat use. Space use is a fundamental component of an animal’s ecology and the extent of an animal’s home range has consequences for individual distributions, community structure and ecosystem function. As ocean temperatures continue to rise as a result of global warming, determining the effects of temperature on space use and movement patterns of...

Data from: Survival, gene and metabolite responses of Litoria verreauxii alpina frogs to fungal disease chytridiomycosis

Laura Grogan, Jason Mulvenna, Joel P. A. Gummer, Benjamin C. Scheele, Lee Berger, Scott D. Cashins, Michael S. McFadden, Peter Harlow, David A. Hunter, Robert D. Trengove & Lee F. Skerratt
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN ANOTHER PUBLICATION. PLEASE SEE http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14493. The fungal skin disease chytridiomycosis has caused the devastating decline and extinction of hundreds of amphibian species globally, yet the potential for evolving resistance, and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. We exposed 406 naïve, captive-raised alpine tree frogs (Litoria verreauxii alpina) from multiple populations (one evolutionarily naïve to chytridiomycosis) to the aetiological agent Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in two concurrent and...

Data from: Giant coral reef fishes display markedly different susceptibility to night spearfishing

Alan R. Pearse, Richard J. Hamilton, John Howard Choat, John Pita, Glenn Almany, Nate Peterson, Grant S. Hamilton & Erin E. Peterson
The humphead wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus) and bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) are two of the largest, most iconic fishes of Indo-Pacific coral reefs. Both species form prized components of subsistence and commercial fisheries and are vulnerable to overfishing. C. undulatus is listed as Endangered and B. muricatum as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. We investigated how night spearfishing pressure and habitat associations affected both species in a relatively lightly exploited setting; the...

Data from: A framework for resolving cryptic species: a case study from the lizards of the Australian Wet Tropics

Sonal Singhal, Conrad J. Hoskin, Patrick Couper, Sally Potter & Craig Moritz
As we collect range-wide genetic data for morphologically-defined species, we increasingly unearth evidence for cryptic diversity. Delimiting this cryptic diversity is challenging, both because the divergences span a continuum and because the lack of overt morphological differentiation suggests divergence has proceeded heterogeneously. Here, we address these challenges as we diagnose and describe species in three co-occurring species groups of Australian lizards. By integrating genomic and morphological data with data on hybridization and introgression from contact...

Data from: Blue Carbon stocks of Great Barrier Reef deep-water seagrasses

Paul York, Peter I. Macreadie & Michael A. Rasheed
Shallow-water seagrasses capture and store globally-significant quantities of organic carbon (OC), often referred to as ‘Blue Carbon’; however, data is lacking on the importance of deep-water (>15 m) seagrasses as Blue Carbon sinks. We compared OC stocks from deep-, mid- and shallow-water seagrasses at Lizard Island within the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon. We found deep-water seagrasses (Halophila species) contained similar levels of OC as shallow-water species (e.g Halodule uninervis) (0.64 ± 0.08% and 0.9 ±...

Data from: Community-wide scan identifies fish species associated with coral reef services across the Indo-Pacific

Eva Maire, Sébastien Villéger, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Andrew S. Hoey, Joshua Cinner, Sebastian C.A. Ferse, Catherine Aliaume, David J. Booth, David A. Feary, Michel Kulbicki, Stuart A. Sandin, Laurent Vigliola, David Mouillot & Sebastian C. A. Ferse
Determining whether many functionally complementary species or only a subset of key species are necessary to maintain ecosystem functioning and services is a critical question in community ecology and biodiversity conservation. Identifying such key species remains challenging, especially in the tropics where many species co-occur and can potentially support the same or different processes. Here, we developed a new community-wide scan (CWS) approach, analogous to the genome-wide scan, to identify fish species that significantly contribute,...

Data from: Reduced competition may allow generalist species to benefit from habitat homogenization

Eric J. Nordberg & Lin Schwarzkopf
1. Complex environments support high biodiversity and diverse microhabitat availability, which may reduce the intensity of competition among species. Both natural and anthropogenic disturbances reduce the structural complexity of habitats, leading to homogenization. High abundances of common, generalist species in disturbed habitats may be driven by reduced competition from specialists in similar habitats. 2. We quantified habitat availability for and utilization of three co-occurring arboreal geckos (Australian native house geckos [Gehyra dubia], northern velvet geckos...

Data from: Universal target-enrichment baits for anthozoan (Cnidaria) phylogenomics: new approaches to long-standing problems

Andrea M. Quattrini, Brant C. Faircloth, Luisa F. Dueñas, Thomas C.L. Bridge, Mercer R. Brügler, Ivan F. Calixto-Botía, Danielle M. DeLeo, Sylvain Foret, Santiago Herrera, Simon M.Y. Lee, David J. Miller, Carlos Prada, Gandhi Rádis-Baptista, Catalina Ramírez-Portilla, Juan A. Sánchez, Estefania Rodriguez, Catherine S. McFadden, Tom C. L. Bridge & Simon M. Y. Lee
Anthozoans (e.g., corals, anemones) are an ecologically important and diverse group of marine metazoans that occur from shallow to deep waters worldwide. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships among the ~7500 species within this class is hindered by the lack of phylogenetically informative markers that can be reliably sequenced across a diversity of taxa. We designed and tested 16,308 RNA baits to capture 720 Ultraconserved Element loci and 1,071 exon loci. Library preparation and...

Data from: Outlier SNPs detect weak regional structure against a background of genetic homogeneity in the Eastern Rock Lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi

Laura N. Woodings, Nicholas P. Murphy, Stephen R. Doyle, Nathan E. Hall, Andrew J. Robinson, Geoffrey W. Liggins, Bridget S. Green, Ira R. Cooke, James J. Bell & Jan M. Strugnell
Genetic differentiation is characteristically weak in marine species making assessments of population connectivity and structure difficult. However the advent of genomic methods have increased genetic resolution, enabling studies to detect weak, but significant population differentiation within marine species. With an increasing number of studies employing high resolution genome-wide techniques, we are realising the connectivity of marine populations is often complex and quantifying this complexity can provide an understanding of the processes shaping marine species genetic...

Data from: Debugging diversity – a pan‐continental exploration of the potential of terrestrial blood‐feeding leeches as a vertebrate monitoring tool

Ida Bærholm Schnell, Kristine Bohmann, Sebastian E. Schultze, Stine R. Richter, Dáithí C. Murray, Mikkel-Holger S. Sinding, David Bass, John E. Cadle, Mason J. Campbell, Rainer Dulch, David P. Edwards, Thomas N. E. Gray, Teis Hansen, Anh N. Q. Hoa, Christina Lehmkuhl Noer, Sigrid Heise-Pavlov, Adam F. Sander Pedersen, Juliot C. Ramamonjisoa, Mark E. Siddall, Andrew Tilker, Carl Traeholt, Nicholas Wilkinson, Paul Woodcock, Douglas W. Yu, Mads Frost Bertelsen … & Ida Baerholm Schnell
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an applicable non-invasive tool with which to obtain information about biodiversity. A sub-discipline of eDNA is iDNA (invertebrate-derived DNA), where genetic material ingested by invertebrates is used to characterise the biodiversity of the species that served as hosts. While promising, these techniques are still in their infancy, as they have only been explored on limited numbers of samples from only a single or a few different locations....

Data from: Genomic comparisons reveal biogeographic and anthropogenic impacts in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus); a dietary-specialist species distributed across heterogeneous environments

Shannon R. Kjeldsen, Herman W. Raadsma, Kellie A. Leigh, Jennifer R. Tobey, David Phalen, Andrew Krockenberger, William A. Ellis, Emily Hynes, Damien P. Higgins & Kyall R. Zenger
The Australian koala is an iconic marsupial with specific dietary requirements distributed across heterogeneous environments, over a large geographic range. The distribution and genetic structure of koala populations has been heavily influenced by human actions, specifically habitat modification, hunting and translocation of koalas. There is currently limited information on population diversity and gene-flow at a species-wide scale, or with consideration to the potential impacts of local adaptation. Using species-wide sampling across heterogeneous environments, and high-density...

Data from: The role of geospatial hotspots in the spatial spread of tuberculosis in rural Ethiopia: a mathematical modelling

Debebe Shaweno, James M. Trauer, Justin T. Denholm & Emma S. McBryde
Geospatial tuberculosis hotspots are hubs of TB transmission both within and across community groups. We aimed to quantify the extent to which these hotspots account for the spatial spread of TB in a high-burden setting. We developed spatially coupled models to quantify the spread of TB from geographic hotspots to distant regions in rural Ethiopia. The population was divided into three ‘patches’ based on their proximity to transmission hotspots, namely hotspots, adjacent regions and remote...

Data from: Rates of population differentiation and speciation are decoupled in sea snakes

Charlotte R. Nitschke, Mathew Hourston, Vinay Udyawer & Kate L. Sanders
Comparative phylogeography can inform many macroevolutionary questions, such as whether species diversification is limited by rates of geographic population differentiation. We examined the link between population genetic structure and species diversification in the fully aquatic sea snakes (Hydrophiinae) by comparing mitochondrial phylogeography in 16 species from two closely related clades that show contrasting diversification dynamics across northern Australia. Contrary to expectations from theory and several empirical studies, our results show that, at the geographic scale...

Data from: Methods for normalizing microbiome data: an ecological perspective

Donald T. McKnight, Roger Huerlimann, Deborah S. Bower, Lin Schwarzkopf, Ross A. Alford & Kyall R. Zenger
1. Microbiome sequencing data often need to be normalized due to differences in read depths, and recommendations for microbiome analyses generally warn against using proportions or rarefying to normalize data and instead advocate alternatives, such as upper quartile, CSS, edgeR-TMM, or DESeq-VS. Those recommendations are, however, based on studies that focused on differential abundance testing and variance standardization, rather than community-level comparisons (i.e., beta diversity), Also, standardizing the within-sample variance across samples may suppress differences...

Data from: Phylogenomics of a rapid radiation: the Australian rainbow skinks

Jason G. Bragg, Sally Potter, Ana C. Afonso Silva, Conrad J. Hoskin, Benjamin Y.H. Bai & Craig Moritz
Background: The application of target capture with next-generation sequencing now enables phylogenomic analyses of rapidly radiating clades of species. But such analyses are complicated by extensive incomplete lineage sorting, demanding the use of methods that consider this process explicitly, such as the multi-species coalescent (MSC) model. However, the MSC makes strong assumptions about divergence history and population structure, and when using the full Bayesian implementation, current computational limits mean that relatively few loci and samples...

Data from: Parallel evolution and adaptation to environmental factors in a marine flatfish: implications for fisheries and aquaculture management of the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

Fernanda Dotti Do Prado, Manuel Vera, Miguel Hermida, Carmen Bouza, Belén G. Pardo, Román Vilas, Andrés Blanco, Carlos Fernández, Francesco Maroso, Gregory E. Maes, Cemal Turan, Filip A.M. Volckaert, John B. Taggart, Adrian Carr, Rob Ogden, Einar E. Nielsen, The Aquatrace Consortium, Paulino Martínez & Filip A. M. Volckaert
Unraveling adaptive genetic variation represents, in addition to the estimate of population demographic parameters, a cornerstone for the management of aquatic natural living resources, which in turn, represent the raw material for breeding programs. The turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) is a marine flatfish of high commercial value living on the European continental shelf. While wild populations are declining, aquaculture is flourishing in Southern Europe. We evaluated the genetic structure of turbot throughout its natural distribution range...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • James Cook University
    32
  • Monash University
    4
  • Australian National University
    3
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    3
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Center for Human Genetics
    2
  • University of Windsor
    2
  • Deakin University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Queensland Museum
    2