32 Works

Data from: Rates of population differentiation and speciation are decoupled in sea snakes

Charlotte R. Nitschke, Mathew Hourston, Vinay Udyawer & Kate L. Sanders
Comparative phylogeography can inform many macroevolutionary questions, such as whether species diversification is limited by rates of geographic population differentiation. We examined the link between population genetic structure and species diversification in the fully aquatic sea snakes (Hydrophiinae) by comparing mitochondrial phylogeography in 16 species from two closely related clades that show contrasting diversification dynamics across northern Australia. Contrary to expectations from theory and several empirical studies, our results show that, at the geographic scale...

Data from: The role of geospatial hotspots in the spatial spread of tuberculosis in rural Ethiopia: a mathematical modelling

Debebe Shaweno, James M. Trauer, Justin T. Denholm & Emma S. McBryde
Geospatial tuberculosis hotspots are hubs of TB transmission both within and across community groups. We aimed to quantify the extent to which these hotspots account for the spatial spread of TB in a high-burden setting. We developed spatially coupled models to quantify the spread of TB from geographic hotspots to distant regions in rural Ethiopia. The population was divided into three ‘patches’ based on their proximity to transmission hotspots, namely hotspots, adjacent regions and remote...

Data from: Universal target-enrichment baits for anthozoan (Cnidaria) phylogenomics: new approaches to long-standing problems

Andrea M. Quattrini, Brant C. Faircloth, Luisa F. Dueñas, Thomas C.L. Bridge, Mercer R. Brügler, Ivan F. Calixto-Botía, Danielle M. DeLeo, Sylvain Foret, Santiago Herrera, Simon M.Y. Lee, David J. Miller, Carlos Prada, Gandhi Rádis-Baptista, Catalina Ramírez-Portilla, Juan A. Sánchez, Estefania Rodriguez, Catherine S. McFadden, Tom C. L. Bridge & Simon M. Y. Lee
Anthozoans (e.g., corals, anemones) are an ecologically important and diverse group of marine metazoans that occur from shallow to deep waters worldwide. However, our understanding of the evolutionary relationships among the ~7500 species within this class is hindered by the lack of phylogenetically informative markers that can be reliably sequenced across a diversity of taxa. We designed and tested 16,308 RNA baits to capture 720 Ultraconserved Element loci and 1,071 exon loci. Library preparation and...

Data from: Reduced competition may allow generalist species to benefit from habitat homogenization

Eric J. Nordberg & Lin Schwarzkopf
1. Complex environments support high biodiversity and diverse microhabitat availability, which may reduce the intensity of competition among species. Both natural and anthropogenic disturbances reduce the structural complexity of habitats, leading to homogenization. High abundances of common, generalist species in disturbed habitats may be driven by reduced competition from specialists in similar habitats. 2. We quantified habitat availability for and utilization of three co-occurring arboreal geckos (Australian native house geckos [Gehyra dubia], northern velvet geckos...

Data from: Outlier SNPs detect weak regional structure against a background of genetic homogeneity in the Eastern Rock Lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi

Laura N. Woodings, Nicholas P. Murphy, Stephen R. Doyle, Nathan E. Hall, Andrew J. Robinson, Geoffrey W. Liggins, Bridget S. Green, Ira R. Cooke, James J. Bell & Jan M. Strugnell
Genetic differentiation is characteristically weak in marine species making assessments of population connectivity and structure difficult. However the advent of genomic methods have increased genetic resolution, enabling studies to detect weak, but significant population differentiation within marine species. With an increasing number of studies employing high resolution genome-wide techniques, we are realising the connectivity of marine populations is often complex and quantifying this complexity can provide an understanding of the processes shaping marine species genetic...

Data from: Debugging diversity – a pan‐continental exploration of the potential of terrestrial blood‐feeding leeches as a vertebrate monitoring tool

Ida Bærholm Schnell, Kristine Bohmann, Sebastian E. Schultze, Stine R. Richter, Dáithí C. Murray, Mikkel-Holger S. Sinding, David Bass, John E. Cadle, Mason J. Campbell, Rainer Dulch, David P. Edwards, Thomas N. E. Gray, Teis Hansen, Anh N. Q. Hoa, Christina Lehmkuhl Noer, Sigrid Heise-Pavlov, Adam F. Sander Pedersen, Juliot C. Ramamonjisoa, Mark E. Siddall, Andrew Tilker, Carl Traeholt, Nicholas Wilkinson, Paul Woodcock, Douglas W. Yu, Mads Frost Bertelsen … & Ida Baerholm Schnell
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an applicable non-invasive tool with which to obtain information about biodiversity. A sub-discipline of eDNA is iDNA (invertebrate-derived DNA), where genetic material ingested by invertebrates is used to characterise the biodiversity of the species that served as hosts. While promising, these techniques are still in their infancy, as they have only been explored on limited numbers of samples from only a single or a few different locations....

Data from: Genomic comparisons reveal biogeographic and anthropogenic impacts in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus); a dietary-specialist species distributed across heterogeneous environments

Shannon R. Kjeldsen, Herman W. Raadsma, Kellie A. Leigh, Jennifer R. Tobey, David Phalen, Andrew Krockenberger, William A. Ellis, Emily Hynes, Damien P. Higgins & Kyall R. Zenger
The Australian koala is an iconic marsupial with specific dietary requirements distributed across heterogeneous environments, over a large geographic range. The distribution and genetic structure of koala populations has been heavily influenced by human actions, specifically habitat modification, hunting and translocation of koalas. There is currently limited information on population diversity and gene-flow at a species-wide scale, or with consideration to the potential impacts of local adaptation. Using species-wide sampling across heterogeneous environments, and high-density...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • James Cook University
    32
  • Monash University
    4
  • Australian National University
    3
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    3
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Center for Human Genetics
    2
  • University of Windsor
    2
  • Deakin University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Queensland Museum
    2