199 Works

Assessing the functional roles of rays in coastal sandflats

Kevin Crook

Negotiations Over Parental Care: A Test of Alternative Hypotheses in the Clown Anemonefish

Tina Barbasch, Rebecca Branconi, Robin Francis, Madison Pacaro, Maya Srinivasan, Geoff Jones & Peter Buston
In species with biparental care, conflict arises over how much each parent provides to their offspring because both parents benefit from shifting the burden of care to the other. Here, we tested alternative hypotheses for how parents will negotiate offspring care using a wild population of clownfish (Amphiprion percula). We experimentally handicapped parents by fin-clipping the female in 23 groups, the male in 23 groups, and neither parent in 23 groups and measured changes in...

Australian votes in the making: a critical review of voter behaviour research in Australia

Raphaella Kathryn Crosby

Lianas and trees exhibit divergent intrinsic water-use efficiency along elevational gradients in South American and African tropical forests

Francis Mumbanza M., Marijn Bauters, Félicien Meunier, Pascal Boeckx, Lucas Cernusak, Hannes De Deurwaerder, Miro Demol, Camille Meeussen, Bram Sercu, Lore Verryckt, Jana Pauwels, Landry Cizungu N., Selene Báez, Constantin Lubini A. & Hans Verbeeck
Elevational gradients provide excellent opportunities to explore long-term morphological and physiological responses of plants to environmental change. We determined the difference in the elevational pattern of foliar carbon isotope composition (δ13C) between lianas and trees, and assessed whether this difference arises from changes in photosynthesis or stomatal conductance. We also explored the pattern of nutrient limitations with the elevation of these two growth forms. We conducted inventories of lianas and trees using standardized techniques along...

Exploring the application of the principles of Stoic philosophy in the workplace

Chrystie Watson

Bullying in nursing: trapped in history

Peter Hartin

Age- and sex-dependent variation in relatedness corresponds to reproductive skew, territory inheritance and workload in cooperatively breeding cichlids

Dario Josi, Dik Heg, Tomohiro Takeyama, Danielle Bonfils, Dmitry A. Konovalov, Joachim G. Frommen, Masanori Kohda & Michael Taborsky
Kin selection plays a major role in the evolution of cooperative systems. However, many social species exhibit complex within-group relatedness structures, where kin selection alone cannot explain the occurrence of cooperative behaviour. Understanding such social structures is crucial to elucidate the evolution and maintenance of multi-layered cooperative societies. In lamprologine cichlids, intragroup relatedness seems to correlate positively with reproductive skew, suggesting that in this clade dominants tend to provide reproductive concessions to unrelated subordinates to...

Correlation of internal and external pressure fluctuations in industrial buildings

Geeth Gayantha Bodhinayake

The movement of things: tracing eighteenth-century Polynesian artefacts from HMS Pandora

Jasmin Ii Sabai Günther

Urban construct: visualising space in Townsville’s built environment

Neil A. Binnie

Climate change doubles sedimentation-induced coral recruit mortality (NESP TWQ 5.2, AIMS, JCU AND AIMS@JCU)

Christopher Brunner, Sven Uthicke, Gerard Ricardo & Andrew Negri

Data from: Estimating encounter location distributions from animal tracking data

Michael Noonan, Ricardo Martinez-Garcia, Grace H. Davis, Margaret C. Crofoot, Roland Kays, Ben T. Hirsch, Damien Caillaud, Eric Payne, Andrew Sih, David L. Sinn, Orr Spiegel, William F. Fagan, Christen H. Fleming & Justin M. Calabrese
1. Ecologists have long been interested in linking individual behavior with higher-level processes. For motile species, this 'upscaling' is governed by how well any given movement strategy maximizes encounters with positive factors, and minimizes encounters with negative factors. Despite the importance of encounter events for a broad range of ecological processes, encounter theory has not kept pace with developments in animal tracking or movement modeling. Furthermore, existing work has focused primarily on the relationship between...

Fluctuation statistics and non-renewal behavior in nanoscale quantum transport

Samuel Rudge

Frontier conflict in the Bowen district, 1861-1874

N. A. Loos

Ecological energetics of climate change for tropical sharks

Ian Alexander Bouyoucos

Endothermy makes fishes faster but does not expand their thermal niche

Lucy Harding, Andrew Jackson, Adam Barnett, Ian Donohue, Lewis Halsey, Charlie Huveneers, Carl Meyer, Yannis Papastamatiou, Jayson Semmens, Erin Spencer, Yuuki Watanabe & Nicholas Payne
1. Regional endothermy has evolved several times in marine fishes, and two competing hypotheses are generally proposed to explain the evolutionary drivers behind this trait: thermal niche expansion and elevated cruising speeds. Evidence to support either hypothesis is equivocal, and the ecological advantages conferred by endothermy in fishes remain debated. 2. By compiling published biologging data and collecting precise speed measurements from free-swimming fishes in the wild, we directly test whether endothermic fishes encounter broader...

Fire and environmental change in northern Australian savannas during the Holocene

Emma Caitlin Rehn

Registration Year

  • 2021
    199

Resource Types

  • Dissertation
    164
  • Dataset
    25
  • Journal
    7
  • Book
    1
  • Report
    1
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • James Cook University
    199
  • The Nature Conservancy
    2
  • University of New England
    2
  • Charles Darwin University
    2
  • Boston University
    2
  • Capital Regional District
    1
  • Victoria University of Wellington
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Stanford University
    1