14 Works

Data from: Genotyping-by-sequencing of genome-wide microsatellite loci reveals fine-scale harvest composition in a coastal Atlantic salmon fishery

Ian R. Bradbury, Brendan F. Wringe, Beth Watson, Ian Paterson, John Horne, Robert Beiko, Sarah J. Lehnert, Marie Clément, Eric C. Anderson, Nicholas W. Jeffery, Steven Duffy, Emma Sylvester, Martha Robertson & Paul Bentzen
Individual assignment and genetic mixture analysis are commonly utilized in contemporary wildlife and fisheries management. Although microsatellite loci provide unparalleled numbers of alleles per locus, their use in assignment applications is increasingly limited. However, next-generation sequencing, in conjunction with novel bioinformatic tools allows large numbers of microsatellite loci to be simultaneously genotyped, presenting new opportunities for individual assignment and genetic mixture analysis. Here we scanned the published Atlantic salmon genome to identify 706 microsatellite loci,...

Data from: Drivers of temporal beta diversity of a benthic community in a seasonally hypoxic ocean fjord

Jackson W.F. Chu, Curtis Curkan, Verena Tunnicliffe & Jackson W. F. Chu
Global expansion of oxygen deficient (hypoxia) waters will have detrimental effects on marine life in the Northeast Pacific Ocean (NEP) where some of the largest proportional losses in aerobic habitat are predicted to occur. However, few studies have accounted for the high environmental variability in this region while including natural community-assembly dynamics. Here, we present results from a 14-month deployment of a benthic camera platform tethered to the VENUS cabled observatory in the seasonally hypoxic...

Data from: Estimating the relative fitness of escaped farmed salmon offspring in the wild and modeling the consequences of invasion for wild populations

Emma V.A. Sylvester, Brendan F. Wringe, Steven J. Duffy, Lorraine C. Hamilton, Ian A. Fleming, Marco Castellani, Paul Bentzen, Ian R. Bradbury & Emma V. A. Sylvester
Throughout their native range, wild Atlantic salmon populations are threatened by hybridization and introgression with escapees from net-pen salmon aquaculture. Although domestic-wild hybrid offspring have shown reduced fitness in lab and field experiments, consequential impacts on population abundance and genetic integrity remain difficult to predict in the field, in part because the strength of selection against domestic offspring is often unknown and context-dependent. Here we follow a single large escape event of farmed Atlantic salmon...

Data from: Genome-wide evidence of environmentally mediated secondary contact of European green crab (Carcinus maenas) lineages in eastern North America

Nicholas W. Jeffery, Ian R. Bradbury, Ryan R.E. Stanley, Brendan F. Wringe, Mallory Van Wyngaarden, J. Ben Lowen, Cynthia H. McKenzie, Kyle Matheson, Philip S. Sargent, Claudio DiBacco & Ryan R. E. Stanley
Genetic-environment associations are increasingly revealed through population genomic data and can occur through a number of processes, including secondary contact, divergent natural selection, or isolation-by-distance. Here we investigate the influence of the environment, including seasonal temperature and salinity, on the population structure of the invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas) in eastern North America. Green crab populations in eastern North America are associated with two independent invasions, previously shown to consist of distinct northern and...

Data from: The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas

Máire Ní Leathlobhair, Angela R. Perri, Evan K. Irving-Pease, Kelsey E. Witt, Anna Linderholm, James Haile, Ophelie Lebrasseur, Carly Ameen, Jeffrey Blick, Adam R. Boyko, Selina Brace, Yahaira Nunes Cortes, Susan J. Crockford, Alison Devault, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Morley Eldridge, Jacob Enk, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Kevin Gori, Vaughan Grimes, Eric Guiry, Anders J. Hansen, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, John Johnson, Andrew Kitchen … & Laurent A. F. Frantz
Dogs were present in the Americas prior to the arrival of European colonists, but the origin and fate of these pre-contact dogs are largely unknown. We sequenced 71 mitochondrial and seven nuclear genomes from ancient North American and Siberian dogs spanning ~9,000 years. Our analysis indicates that American dogs were not domesticated from North American wolves. Instead, American dogs form a monophyletic lineage that likely originated in Siberia and dispersed into the Americas alongside people....

Data from: Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale

Alicia Dalongeville, Marco Andrello, David Mouillot, Stephane Lobreaux, Marie-Josée Fortin, Frida Lasram, Jonathan Belmaker, Delphine Rocklin & Stéphanie Manel
Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea....

Data from: Extensive hybridization following a large escape of domesticated Atlantic salmon in the Northwest Atlantic

Brendan F. Wringe, Nicholas W. Jeffery, Ryan R.E. Stanley, Lorraine C. Hamilton, Eric C. Anderson, Ian A. Fleming, Carole Grant, J. Brian Dempson, Geoff Veinott, Steven J. Duffy & Ian R. Bradbury
SNP genotype dataSNP genotype data for 95 SNPs for juvenile and baseline samples.2014_2015_data.csvGeographic distance from escape event to each riverGeographic distance from escape event to each riverDistance_from_escape.csvRiver Axial Distances and Catch

Data from: Oceanographic variation influences spatial genomic structure in the sea scallop, Placopecten magellanicus

Mallory Van Wyngaarden, Paul V. R. Snelgrove, Claudio DiBacco, Lorraine C. Hamilton, Naiara Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Luyao Zhan, Robert Beiko, Ian R. Bradbury & Robert G. Beiko
Environmental factors can influence diversity and population structure in marine species and accurate understanding of this influence can both improve fisheries management and help predict responses to environmental change. We used 7163 SNPs derived from restriction site-associated DNA sequencing genotyped in 245 individuals of the economically important sea scallop, Placopecten magellanicus, to evaluate the correlations between oceanographic variation and a previously identified latitudinal genomic cline. Sea scallops span a broad latitudinal area (>10 degrees), and...

Data from: Anatomy of the Ediacaran rangeomorph Charnia masoni

Frances S. Dunn, Philip R. Wilby, Charlotte G. Kenchington, Dmitry V. Grazhdankin, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Alexander G. Liu & Dmitriy V. Grazhdankin
The Ediacaran macrofossil Charnia masoni Ford is perhaps the most iconic member of the Rangeomorpha: a group of seemingly sessile, frondose organisms that dominates late Ediacaran benthic, deep‐marine fossil assemblages. Despite C. masoni exhibiting broad palaeogeographical and stratigraphical ranges, there have been few morphological studies that consider the variation observed among populations of specimens derived from multiple global localities. We present an analysis of C. masoni that evaluates specimens from the UK, Canada and Russia,...

Data from: Dynamically prognosticating patients with hepatocellular carcinoma through survival paths mapping based on time-series data

Lujun Shen, Qi Zeng, Pi Guo, Jingjun Huang, Chaofeng Li, Tao Pan, Boyang Chang, Nan Wu, Lewei Yang, Qifeng Chen, Tao Huang, Wang Li & Peihong Wu
Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) always require routine surveillance and repeated treatment, which leads to accumulation of huge amount of clinical data. A predictive model utilizes the time-series data to facilitate dynamic prognosis prediction and treatment planning is warranted. Here we introduced an analytical approach, which converts the time-series data into a cascading survival map, in which each survival path bifurcates at fixed time interval depending on selected prognostic features by the Cox-based feature selection....

Data from: Seabird species vary in behavioural response to drone census

Émile Brisson-Curadeau, David Bird, Chantelle Burke, David A. Fifield, Paul Pace, Richard B. Sherley & Kyle H. Elliott
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an opportunity to rapidly census wildlife in remote areas while removing some of the hazards. However, wildlife may respond negatively to the UAVs, thereby skewing counts. We surveyed four species of Arctic cliff-nesting seabirds (glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus, Iceland gull Larus glaucoides, common murre Uria aalge and thick-billed murre Uria lomvia) using a UAV and compared censusing techniques to ground photography. An average of 8.5% of murres flew off in...

Data from: Reproduction as a bottleneck to treeline advance across the circumarctic forest tundra ecotone

Carissa D. Brown, Geneviève Dufour-Tremblay, Ryan G. Jameson, Steven D. Mamet, Andrew J. Trant, Xanthe J. Walker, Stéphane Boudraeu, Karen A. Harper, Greg H.R. Henry, Luise Hermanutz, Annika Hofgaard, Ludmila Isaeva, G. Peter Kershaw, Jill F. Johnstone & Gregory H. R. Henry
The fundamental niche of many species is shifting with climate change, especially in sub-arctic ecosystems with pronounced recent warming. Ongoing warming in sub-arctic regions should lessen environmental constraints on tree growth and reproduction, leading to increased success of trees colonising tundra. Nevertheless, variable responses of treeline ecotones have been documented in association with warming temperatures. One explanation for time lags between increasingly favourable environmental conditions and treeline ecotone movement is reproductive limitations caused by low...

Data from: Environmental extremes drive population structure at the northern range limit of Atlantic salmon in North America

Emma V.A. Sylvester, Robert G. Beiko, Paul Bentzen, Ian Paterson, John B. Horne, Beth Watson, Sarah Lehnert, Steven Duffy, Marie Clément, Martha J. Robertson, Ian R. Bradbury & Emma V. A. Sylvester
Conservation of exploited species requires an understanding of both genetic diversity and the dominant structuring forces, particularly near range limits, where climatic variation can drive rapid expansions or contractions of geographic range. Here, we examine population structure and landscape associations in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) across a heterogeneous landscape near the northern range limit in Labrador, Canada. Analysis of two amplicon-based data sets containing 101 microsatellites and 376 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 35 locations...

Data from: Can variation in standard metabolic rate explain context-dependent performance of farmed salmon offspring?

Grethe Robertsen, Donald Reid, Sigurd Einum, Tonje Aronsen, Ian A. Fleming, Line E. Sundt-Hansen, Sten Karlsson, Eli Kvingedal, Ola Ugedal & Kjetil Hindar
Escaped farmed Atlantic salmon interbreed with wild Atlantic salmon, leaving offspring that often have lower success in nature than pure wild salmon. On top of this, presence of farmed salmon descendants can impair production of wild type recruits. We hypothesize that both these effects connect with farmed salmon having acquired higher standard metabolic rates (SMR, the energetic cost of self-maintenance) during domestication. Furthermore, fitness related advantages of phenotypic traits associated with both high SMR and...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • Memorial University of Newfoundland
    14
  • Dalhousie University
    6
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    5
  • Bedford Institute of Oceanography
    3
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    2
  • Second Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University
    1
  • The Ohio State University
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1