13 Works

Data from: Body size shifts influence effects of increasing temperatures on ectotherm metabolism

Kristina Riemer, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira, Felisa A. Smith, David J. Harris, S.K. Morgan Ernest & S. K. Morgan Ernest
Aim: Warmer temperatures directly increase metabolic rates of ectotherms, but temperature also indirectly affects metabolic rates. Higher temperatures result in smaller body sizes and associated decreases in metabolic rates, and it remains unknown whether this indirect effect of temperature increase could mitigate the direct positive effect of temperature on metabolic rate. Here, we assess whether temperature‐induced shifts in body size are likely to offset the direct influence of temperature on metabolic rate. Location: Global. Time...

Data from: Tracking dragons: stable isotopes reveal the annual cycle of a long-distance migratory insect

Michael T. Hallworth, Peter P. Marra, Kent P. McFarland, Sara Zahendra & Colin E. Studds
Insect migration is globally ubiquitous and can involve continental-scale movements and complex life-histories. Apart from select species of migratory moths and butterflies, little is known about the structure of the annual cycle for migratory insects. Using stable-hydrogen isotope analysis of 852 wing samples from eight countries spanning 140 years, combined with 21 years of citizen science data, we determined the full annual cycle of a large migratory dragonfly, the common green darner (Anax junius). We...

Data from: Offspring growth and mobility in response to variation in parental care: a comparison between populations

Helen R. Sofaer, T. Scott Sillett, Jongmin Yoon, Michael L. Power, Scott A. Morrison & Cameron K. Ghalambor
Life history theory emphasizes the importance of trade-offs in how time and energy are allocated to the competing demands of growth, fecundity, and survival. However, avian studies have historically emphasized the importance of resource acquisition over resource allocation to explain geographic variation in fecundity, parental care, and offspring development. We compared the brood sizes and nestling mass and feather growth trajectories between orange-crowned warblers (Oreothlypis celata) breeding in Alaska versus California, and used 24-hour video...

Data from: Parallel evolution of gene classes, but not genes: evidence from Hawai’ian honeycreeper populations exposed to avian malaria

Loren Cassin-Sackett, Taylor E. Callicrate & Robert C. Fleischer
Adaptation in nature is ubiquitous, yet characterizing its genomic basis is difficult because population demographics cause correlations with non-adaptive loci. Introduction events provide opportunities to observe adaptation over known spatial and temporal scales, facilitating the identification of genes involved in adaptation. The pathogen causing avian malaria, Plasmodium relictum, was introduced to Hawai’i in the 1930s and elicited extinctions and precipitous population declines in native honeycreepers. After a sharp initial population decline, the Hawai’i ‘amakihi (Chlorodrepanis...

Data from: Two-species occupancy modeling accounting for species misidentification and nondetection

Thierry Chambert, Evan H. Campbell Grant, David A. W. Miller, James D. Nichols, Kevin P. Mulder & Adrianne B. Brand
1.In occupancy studies, species misidentification can lead to false positive detections, which can cause severe estimator biases. Currently, all models that account for false positive errors only consider omnibus sources of false detections and are limited to single species occupancy. 2.However, false detections for a given species often occur because of the misidentification with another, closely-related species. To exploit this explicit source of false positive detection error, we develop a two-species occupancy model that accounts...

Data from: Measures of effective population size in sea otters reveal special considerations for wide-ranging species

Roderick B. Gagne, M. Timothy Tinker, Kyle D. Gustafson, Katherine Ralls, Larson Shawn, L. Max Tarjan, Melissa A. Miller & Holly B. Ernest
Conservation genetic techniques and considerations of the evolutionary potential of a species are increasingly being applied to species conservation. For example, effective population size (Ne) estimates are useful for determining the conservation status of species, yet accurate estimates of current Ne remain difficult to obtain. The effective population size can contribute to setting federal delisting criteria, as was done for the southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). After being hunted to near extinction during the...

Data from: Variation in nest characteristics and brooding patterns of female Black-throated Blue Warblers is associated with thermal cues

Maria G. Smith, Sara A. Kaiser, T. Scott Sillett & Michael S. Webster
Thermal variation poses a problem for nesting birds and can result in reduced offspring growth rates and survival. To increase the thermal stability of the nest, females can adjust nest characteristics and nest attendance in response to changes in environmental conditions. However, it is unclear how and to what extent females modify parental behaviors during various stages of offspring development. We tested the hypothesis that females adjust nest characteristics and brooding patterns in response to...

Data from: A comprehensive analysis of autocorrelation and bias in home range estimation

Michael J. Noonan, Marlee A. Tucker, Christen H. Fleming, Tom S. Akre, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Jeanne Altmann, Pamela C. Antunes, Jerrold L. Belant, Dean Beyer, Niels Blaum, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, , Rogerio De Paula Cunha, Jasja Dekker, Jonathan Drescher-Lehman, Nina Farwig, Claudia Fichtel, Christina Fischer, Adam T. Ford, Jacob R. Goheen, René Janssen, Florian Jeltsch, Matthew Kauffman, Peter M. Kappeler … & Justin M. Calabrese
Home range estimation is routine practice in ecological research. While advances in animal tracking technology have increased our capacity to collect data to support home range analysis, these same advances have also resulted in increasingly autocorrelated data. Consequently, the question of which home range estimator to use on modern, highly autocorrelated tracking data remains open. This question is particularly relevant given that most estimators assume independently sampled data. Here, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of...

Data from: Influences of fire–vegetation feedbacks and post-fire recovery rates on forest landscape vulnerability to altered fire regimes

Alan J. Tepley, Enrique Thomann, Thomas T. Veblen, George L.W. Perry, Andrés Holz, Juan Paritsis, Thomas Kitzberger, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira & George L. W. Perry
1. In the context of on-going climatic warming, forest landscapes face increasing risk of conversion to non-forest vegetation through alteration of their fire regimes and their post-fire recovery dynamics. However, this pressure could be amplified or dampened, depending on how fire-driven changes to vegetation feed back to alter the extent or behavior of subsequent fires. 2. Here we develop a mathematical model to formalize understanding of how fire–vegetation feedbacks and the time to forest recovery...

Data from: The strength of migratory connectivity for birds en route to breeding through the Gulf of Mexico

Emily B. Cohen, Clark R. Rushing, Frank R. Moore, Michael T. Hallworth, Jeffrey A. Hostetler, Mariamar Gutierrez Ramirez & Peter P. Marra
The strength of migratory connectivity is a measure of the cohesion of populations among phases of the annual cycle, including breeding, migration, and wintering. Many Nearctic-Neotropical species have strong migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering phases of the annual cycle. It is less clear if this strength persists during migration when multiple endogenous and exogenous factors may decrease the cohesion of populations among routes or through time along the same routes. We sampled three bird...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Mammal communities are larger and more diverse in moderately developed areas

Arielle Waldstein Parsons, Tavis Forrester, Megan C. Baker-Whatton, William J. McShea, Christopher T. Rota, Stephanie G. Schuttler, Joshua J. Millspaugh & Roland Kays
Developed areas are thought to have low species diversity, low animal abundance, few native predators, and thus low resilience and ecological function. Working with citizen scientist volunteers to survey mammals at 1427 sites across two development gradients (wild-rural-exurban-suburban-urban) and four plot types (large forests, small forest fragments, open areas and residential yards) in the eastern US, we show that developed areas actually had significantly higher or statistically similar mammalian occupancy, relative abundance, richness and diversity...

Data from: Correcting for missing and irregular data in home-range estimation

Christen H. Fleming, Daniel Sheldon, William F. Fagan, Peter Leimgruber, Thomas Mueller, Dejid Nandintsetseg, Michael J. Noonan, Kirk A. Olson, Edy Setyawan, Abraham Sianipar & Justin M. Calabrese
Home-range estimation is an important application of animal tracking data that is frequently complicated by autocorrelation, sampling irregularity, and small effective sample sizes. We introduce a novel, optimal weighting method that accounts for temporal sampling bias in autocorrelated tracking data. This method corrects for irregular and missing data, such that oversampled times are downweighted and undersampled times are upweighted to minimize error in the home-range estimate. We also introduce computationally efficient algorithms that make this...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
    13
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    2
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
    2
  • Philipp University of Marburg
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • Goethe University Frankfurt
    2
  • North Carolina State University
    2