14 Works

Data from: Targeted reforestation could reverse declines in connectivity for understory birds in a tropical habitat corridor

Matthew E. Fagan, Ruth S. DeFries, Steven E. Sesnie, J. Pablo Arroyo-Mora & Robin L. Chazdon
Re-establishing connectivity between protected areas isolated by habitat clearing is a key conservation goal in the humid tropics. In northeastern Costa Rica, payments for environmental services (PES) and a government ban on deforestation have subsidized forest protection and reforestation in the San Juan–La Selva Biological Corridor (SJLSBC), resulting in a decline in mature forest loss and the expansion of tree plantations. We use field studies and graph models to assess how conservation efforts have altered...

Data from: Influence of introduction history on genetic variation in introduced populations: a case study of Oregon Chub

Patrick W. DeHaan, Brice A. Adams, Paul D. Scheerer & Brian L. Bangs
Population introductions and reintroductions have become a common tool for conserving threatened species, but oftentimes introduced populations have reduced the genetic diversity compared with the source population they were founded from. Population introductions played an important role in the recovery of the Oregon Chub Oregonichthys crameri, a small floodplain minnow found in western Oregon. Unlike many introduction efforts, introduced populations of Oregon Chub were founded using large numbers of individuals (hundreds in many cases) and...

Data from: Disentangling density-dependent dynamics using full annual cycle models and Bayesian model weight updating

Orin J. Robinson, Conor P. McGowan & Patrick K. Devers
Density dependence regulates populations of many species across all taxonomic groups. Understanding density dependence is vital for predicting the effects of climate, habitat loss and/or management actions on wild populations. Migratory species likely experience seasonal changes in the relative influence of density dependence on population processes such as survival and recruitment throughout the annual cycle. These effects must be accounted for when characterizing migratory populations via population models. To evaluate effects of density on seasonal...

Data from: Phylogenetics support an ancient common origin of two scientific icons: Devils Hole and Devils Hole pupfish

İsmail K. Sağlam, Jason Baumsteiger, Matt J. Smith, Javier Linares-Casenave, Andrew L. Nichols, Sean M. O'Rourke & Michael R. Miller
The Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis; DHP) is an icon of conservation biology. Isolated in a 50 m2 pool (Devils Hole), DHP is one of the rarest vertebrate species known and an evolutionary anomaly, having survived in complete isolation for thousands of years. However, recent findings suggest DHP might be younger than commonly thought, potentially introduced to Devils Hole by humans in the past thousand years. As a result, the significance of DHP from an...

Data from: Seasonal change in trophic niche of adfluvial arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) and coexisting fishes in a high-elevation lake system

Kyle A. Cutting, Wyatt F. Cross, Michelle L. Anderson & Elizabeth G. Reese
Introduction of non-native species is a leading threat to global aquatic biodiversity. Competition between native and non-native species is often influenced by changes in food availability or suitable habitat conditions. We investigated diet breadth and degree of trophic niche overlap for a fish assemblage of native and non-native species inhabiting a shallow, high elevation lake system. This assemblage includes one of the last remaining post-glacial endemic populations of adfluvial Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) in the...

Data from: Spatio-temporal variation in parasite communities maintains diversity at the major histocompatibility complex class IIβ in the endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow

Megan J. Osborne, Tyler J. Pilger, Joel D. Lusk & Thomas F. Turner
Climate change will strongly impact aquatic ecosystems particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. Fish-parasite interactions will also be affected by predicted altered flow and temperature regimes, and other environmental stressors. Hence, identifying environmental and genetic factors associated with maintaining diversity at immune genes is critical for understanding species’ adaptive capacity. Here we combine genetic (MHC Class IIβ and microsatellites), parasitological and ecological data to explore the relationship between these factors in the remnant wild Rio...

Data from: Increases in the mean and variability of thermal regimes result in differential phenotypic responses among genotypes during early ontogenetic stages of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

Kari J. Dammerman, Juan P. Steibel & Kim T. Scribner
Climate change is affecting thermal conditions worldwide. Understanding organismal responses associated with predicted changes are essential for predicting population persistence. Few studies have examined the effects of both increased mean and variance in temperature on organismal traits, particularly during early life stages. Using lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) from Black Lake, MI, we tested whether phenotypic variation differed among families reared in two constant (10 and 18°C) and two fluctuating temperature treatments (10-19°C) representing temperatures experienced...

Data from: Habitat drives dispersal and survival of translocated juvenile desert tortoises

Melia G. Nafus, Todd C. Esque, Roy C. Averill-Murray, Kenneth E. Nussear & Ronald R. Swaisgood
In spite of growing reliance on translocations in wildlife conservation, translocation efficacy remains inconsistent. One factor that can contribute to failed translocations is releasing animals into poor-quality or otherwise inadequate habitat. Here, we used a targeted approach to test the relationship of habitat features to post-translocation dispersal and survival of juvenile Mojave desert tortoises Gopherus agassizii. We selected three habitat characteristics – rodent burrows, substrate texture (prevalence and size of rocks) and washes (ephemeral river...

Data from: Can physiographic regions substitute for genetically-determined conservation units? A case study with the threatened plant, Silene spaldingii

Peter Lesica, Brice Adams & Christian T. Smith
Protecting genetic diversity throughout the range of a species is important for conservation, as doing so provides for long-term evolutionary potential and persistence under a changing environment. Conservation of diversity at the intraspecific level requires identification of all genetically distinct population segments within species; i.e., conservation units (CUs). Silene spaldingii occurs in grasslands of the Columbia Plateau region of western North America and is listed as threatened under the Federal Endangered Species Act. The recovery...

Data from: Cryptic diversity in black rats Rattus rattus of the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador

Sandi Willows-Munro, Robert C. Dowler, Michael R. Jarcho, Reese B. Phillips, Howard L. Snell, Tammy R. Wilbert & Cody W. Edwards
Human activity has facilitated the introduction of a number of alien mammal species to the Galápagos Archipelago. Understanding the phylogeographic history and population genetics of invasive species on the Archipelago is an important step in predicting future spread and designing effective management strategies. In this study, we describe the invasion pathway of Rattus rattus across the Galápagos using microsatellite data, coupled with historical knowledge. Microsatellite genotypes were generated for 581 R. rattus sampled from 15...

Data from: A generalizable energetics-based model of avian migration to facilitate continental-scale waterbird conservation

Eric V. Lonsdorf, Wayne E. Thogmartin, Sarah Jacobi, Kevin Aagaard, Jorge Coppen, Amélie Davis, Timothy Fox, Patricia Heglund, Rex Johnson, Malcolm T. Jones, Kevin Kenow, James E. Lyons, Kirsten Luke, Shannon Still & Brian Tavernia
Conserving migratory birds is made especially difficult because of movement among spatially disparate locations across the annual cycle. In light of challenges presented by the scale and ecology of migratory birds, successful conservation requires integrating objectives, management, and monitoring across scales, from local management units to ecoregional and flyway administrative boundaries. We present an integrated approach using a spatially explicit energetic-based mechanistic bird migration model useful to conservation decision-making across disparate scales and locations. This...

Data from: Using a full annual cycle model to evaluate long-term population viability of the conservation-reliant Kirtland’s warbler after successful recovery

Donald J. Brown, Christine A. Ribic, Deahn M. Donner, Mark D. Nelson, Carol I. Bocetti, Christie M. Deloria-Sheffeld & Christie M. Deloria-Sheffield
Long-term management planning for conservation-reliant migratory songbirds is particularly challenging because habitat quality in different stages and geographic locations of the annual cycle can have direct and carry-over effects that influence the population dynamics. The Neotropical migratory songbird Kirtland's warbler Setophaga kirtlandii (Baird 1852) is listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and Near Threatened under the IUCN Red List. This conservation-reliant species is being considered for U.S. federal delisting because the species...

Data from: Diabolical survival in Death Valley: recent pupfish colonization, gene flow, and genetic assimilation in the smallest species range on earth

Christopher Martin, Jacob Crawford, Bruce Turner, Lee Simons, Jacob E. Crawford & Christopher H. Martin
One of the most endangered vertebrates, the Devils Hole pupfish Cyprinodon diabolis, survives in a nearly impossible environment: a narrow subterranean fissure in the hottest desert on earth, Death Valley. This species became a conservation icon after a landmark 1976 U.S. Supreme Court case affirming federal groundwater rights to its unique habitat. However, one outstanding question about this species remains unresolved: how long has diabolis persisted in this hellish environment? We used next-generation sequencing of...

Data from: Potential of environmental DNA to evaluate Northern pike (Esox lucius) eradication efforts: an experimental test and case study

Kristine J. Dunker, Adam J. Sepulveda, Robert L. Massengill, Jeffrey B. Olsen, Ora L. Russ, John K. Wenburg & Anton Antonovich
Determining the success of invasive species eradication efforts is challenging because populations at very low abundance are difficult to detect. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling has recently emerged as a powerful tool for detecting rare aquatic animals; however, detectable fragments of DNA can persist over time despite absence of the targeted taxa and can therefore complicate eDNA sampling after an eradication event. This complication is a large concern for fish eradication efforts in lakes since killed...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    14
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • University of New Mexico
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
    1
  • West Virginia University
    1
  • University of North Carolina
    1
  • Goddard Space Flight Center
    1