13 Works

Data from: Body condition explains migratory performance of a long-distance migrant

Sjoerd Duijns, Lawrence J. Niles, Amanda Dey, Yves Aubry, Christian Friis, Stephanie Koch, Alexandra M. Anderson & Paul A. Smith
Body condition (i.e. relative mass after correcting for structural size) affects the behaviour of migrating birds, but how body condition affects migratory performance, timing and fitness is still largely unknown. Here, we studied the effects of relative body condition on individual departure decisions, wind selectivity, flight speed and timing of migration for a long-distance migratory shorebird, the red knot Calidris canutus rufa. By using automated VHF telemetry on a continental scale, we studied knots' migratory...

Data from: Return of a giant: DNA from archival museum samples helps to identify a unique cutthroat trout lineage formerly thought to be extinct

Mary M. Peacock, Evon R. Hekkala, Veronica S. Kirchoff & Lisa G. Heki
Currently one small, native population of the culturally and ecologically important Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi, LCT, Federally listed) remains in the Truckee River watershed of northwestern Nevada and northeastern California. The majority of populations in this watershed were extirpated in the 1940’s due to invasive species, overharvest, anthropogenic water consumption and changing precipitation regimes. In 1977, a population of cutthroat trout discovered in the Pilot Peak Mountains in the Bonneville basin of Utah,...

Data from: Novel, continuous monitoring of fine-scale movement using fixed-position radiotelemetry arrays and random forest location fingerprinting

Andrew B. Harbicht, Theodore Castro-Santos, William R. Ardren, Dimitry Gorsky & Dylan J. Fraser
1. Radio-tag signals from fixed-position antennas are most often used to indicate presence/absence of individuals, or to estimate individual activity levels from signal strength variation within an antenna’s detection zone. The potential of such systems to provide more precise information on tag location and movement has not been explored in great detail in an ecological setting. 2. By reversing the roles that transmitters and receivers play in localization methods common to the telecommunications industry, we...

Data from: Monarch butterfly population decline in North America: identifying the threatening processes

Wayne E. Thogmartin, Ruscena Wiederholt, Karen Oberhauser, Ryan G. Drum, Jay E. Diffendorfer, Sonia Altizer, Orley R. Taylor, John Pleasants, Darius Semmens, Brice Semmens, Richard Erickson, Kaitlin Libby & Laura Lopez-Hoffman
The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) population in North America has sharply declined over the last two decades. Despite rising concern over the monarch butterfly's status, no comprehensive study of the factors driving this decline has been conducted. Using partial least-squares regressions and time-series analysis, we investigated climatic and habitat-related factors influencing monarch population size from 1993 to 2014. Potential threats included climatic factors, habitat loss (milkweed and overwinter forest), disease and agricultural insecticide use (neonicotinoids)....

Data from: Genetic diversity and divergence in the fountain darter (Etheostoma fonticola): implications for conservation of an endangered species

Jeffrey B. Olsen, Andrew P. Kinziger, John K. Wenburg, Cara J. Lewis, Catherine T. Phillips & Kenneth G. Ostrand
The endangered fountain darter Etheostoma fonticola is found only in the Comal and San Marcos rivers in the Guadalupe River basin in central Texas, USA. Comal River fountain darters were believed to be extir- pated following a severe drought in the 1950s and were reintroduced in the early 1970s using 457 darters from the San Marcos River. In this study we used 23 microsatellite loci to describe and evaluate the genetic diversity, population structure and...

Data from: Dynamic occupancy modeling reveals a hierarchy of competition among fishers, grey foxes, and ringtails

David S. Green, Sean M. Matthews, Robert C. Swiers, Richard L. Callas, J. Scott Yaeger, Stuart L. Farber, Michael K. Schwartz & Roger A. Powell
1. Determining how species coexist is critical for understanding functional diversity, niche partitioning and interspecific interactions. Identifying the direct and indirect interactions among sympatric carnivores that enable their coexistence are particularly important to elucidate because they are integral for maintaining ecosystem function. 2. We studied the effects of removing 9 fishers (Pekania pennanti) on their population dynamics and used this perturbation to elucidate the interspecific interactions among fishers, grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and ringtails (Bassariscus...

Data from: Comparative landscape genetic analysis of three Pacific salmon species from subarctic North America

Jeffrey B. Olsen, Penelope A. Crane, Blair G. Flannery, Karen Dunmall, William D. Templin & John K. Wenburg
We examined the assumption that landscape heterogeneity similarly influences the spatial distribution of genetic diversity in closely related and geographically overlapping species. Accordingly, we evaluated the influence of watershed affiliation and nine habitat variables from four categories (spatial isolation, habitat size, climate, and ecology) on population divergence in three species of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, O. kisutch, and O. keta) from three contiguous watersheds in subarctic North America. By incorporating spatial data we found that...

Data from: Extreme precipitation variability, forage quality and large herbivore diet selection in arid environments

, Jay V. Gedir, Jason P. Marshal, Paul R. Krausman, Jamison D. Allen, Glenn C. Duff, Brian D. Jansen, John R. Morgart & James W. Cain
Nutritional ecology forms the interface between environmental variability and large herbivore behaviour, life history characteristics, and population dynamics. Forage conditions in arid and semi-arid regions are driven by unpredictable spatial and temporal patterns in rainfall. Diet selection by herbivores should be directed towards overcoming the most pressing nutritional limitation (i.e. energy, protein [nitrogen, N], moisture) within the constraints imposed by temporal and spatial variability in forage conditions. We investigated the influence of precipitation-induced shifts in...

Data from: Harvesting wildlife affected by climate change: a modelling and management approach for polar bears

Eric V. Regehr, Ryan R. Wilson, Karyn D. Rode, Michael C. Runge & Harry L. Stern
The conservation of many wildlife species requires understanding the demographic effects of climate change, including interactions between climate change and harvest, which can provide cultural, nutritional or economic value to humans. We present a demographic model that is based on the polar bear Ursus maritimus life cycle and includes density-dependent relationships linking vital rates to environmental carrying capacity (K). Using this model, we develop a state-dependent management framework to calculate a harvest level that (i)...

Data from: Identifying demographic and environmental drivers of recruitment and population growth in a cavity nesting sea duck population

Abigail J. Lawson, James S. Sedinger & Eric J. Taylor
Traits with the greatest proportional effects on fitness are typically conserved (Stearns 1992), and traits with larger temporal variation frequently play a dominant role in population dynamics (Cooch et al. 2001). We examined recruitment patterns and population growth in Common Goldeneyes (Bucephala clangula; hereafter goldeneye), using Pradel mark-recapture models from a long-term nest box study (1997-2010). Our objectives were to estimate recruitment (f) and population growth (λ) relative to recruitment origin group (in-situ or unknown),...

Data from: Quantifying the importance of geographic replication and representativeness when estimating demographic rates, using a coastal species as a case study

Christopher R. Field, Katharine J. Ruskin, Bri Benvenuti, Alyssa C. Borowske, Jonathan B. Cohen, Laura Garey, Thomas P. Hodgman, Rebecca A. Kern, Erin King, Alison R. Kocek, Adrienne I. Kovach, Kathleen M. O'Brien, Brian J. Olsen, Nancy Pau, Samuel G. Roberts, Emma Shelly, W. Gregory Shriver, Jennifer Walsh, Chris S. Elphick & Rebecca A. Longenecker
Demographic rates are rarely estimated over an entire species range, limiting empirical tests of ecological patterns and theories, and raising questions about the representativeness of studies that use data from a small part of a range. The uncertainty that results from using demographic rates from just a few sites is especially pervasive in population projections, which are critical for a wide range of questions in ecology and conservation. We developed a simple simulation to quantify...

Data from: The complex effects of demographic history on the estimation of substitution rate: concatenated gene analysis results in no more than twofold overestimation

Christopher H. Martin, Sebastian Hohna, Jacob E. Crawford, Bruce J. Turner, Emilie J. Richards & Lee H. Simons
Our recent estimation of the divergence time and isolation of Death Valley pupfishes, including the iconic Devil’s Hole pupfish (DHP), rewrote widespread assumptions about this group. These species were previously assumed to be relic populations isolated over millions of years; our genomic analyses indicated recent colonization of Devil’s Hole within the past 105–830 years and frequent gene flow among Death Valley populations [1]. These results understandably attracted substantial attention given the iconic battle for conservation...

Data from: The time of origin and genetic diversity of three isolated Kokanee populations in southwest Alaska

Jeffrey B. Olsen, John K. Wenburg, Scott A. Pavey, Joe L. Miller & Troy R. Hamon
We examined the time of origin and genetic diversity of native kokanee, the nonanadromous ecotype of Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus nerka, from three isolated lakes in the Katmai National Park and Preserve in southwest Alaska. These kokanee evolved independently from Sockeye Salmon when migration barriers arose, blocking ocean access. We used information about the relative age of each barrier to hypothesize the relative time of origin for kokanee in each lake. In addition, we used data...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    13
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • University of Nevada Reno
    2
  • University of Arizona
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • New Mexico State University
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • University of North Carolina
    1