14 Works

Data from: Plasticity in nesting adaptations of a tidal marsh endemic bird

Bri Benvenuti, Jennifer Walsh, Kathleen M. O'Brien & Adrienne I. Kovach
If individuals can perceive and manage risks, they may alter their behaviors based on prior experience. This expectation may apply to nest site selection of breeding birds, for which adaptive behavioral responses may enhance fitness. Birds that nest in tidal marshes have adapted to the challenges posed primarily by periodic, monthly tidal flooding and secondarily, by predation. We investigated adaptive responses in nesting behavior of the saltmarsh sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus), an obligate tidal-marsh-breeding bird, using...

Data from: Consumption explains intraspecific variation in nutrient recycling stoichiometry in a desert fish

Eric K. Moody, Evan W. Carson, Jessica R. Corman, Hector Espinosa-Pérez, Jorge Ramos, John L. Sabo & James J. Elser
Consumer-driven nutrient recycling can have substantial effects on primary production and patterns of nutrient limitation in aquatic ecosystems by altering the rates as well as the relative supplies of the key nutrients nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). While variation in nutrient recycling stoichiometry has been well-studied among species, the mechanisms that explain intraspecific variation in recycling N:P are not well-understood. We examined the relative importance of potential drivers of variation in nutrient recycling by the...

Data from: The contribution of road-based citizen science efforts to the conservation of pond-breeding amphibians

Sean C. Sterrett, Rachel A. Katz, William R. Fields, Evan H.C. Grant & Evan H. Campbell Grant
1. Road-side amphibian citizen science programs bring together volunteers focused on collecting scientific data while working to mitigate population declines by directly reducing road mortality of pond-breeding amphibians. Despite the international popularity of these movement-based road-side conservation efforts (i.e., ‘big nights’, ‘bucket brigades’ and ‘toad patrols’), direct benefits to conservation have rarely been quantified or evaluated. 2. As a case study, we used a population simulation approach to evaluate how volunteer intensity, frequency and distribution...

Data from: Variation in age ratio of midcontinent greater white-fronted geese during fall migration

Wade G. Schock, Julian B. Fischer, Craig R. Ely, Robert A. Stehn, Jeffrey M. Welker & Douglas Causey
Annual productivity is an important parameter for the management of waterfowl populations. Fall age ratio (juveniles:total birds) is an index of productivity of the preceding breeding season. However, differences in the timing of migration between family groups and nonbreeding birds may bias age-ratio estimates. We examined temporal variation in age ratios of midcontinent greater white-fronted geese Anser albifrons frontalis from interior and northwestern Alaska at a northern autumn staging area near Delta Junction, Alaska. Photographic...

Data from: Incomplete host immunity favors the evolution of virulence in an emergent pathogen

Arietta E. Fleming-Davies, Paul D. Williams, André A. Dhondt, Andrew P. Dobson, Wesley A. Hochachka, Ariel E. Leon, David H. Ley, Erik E. Osnas & Dana M. Hawley
Immune memory evolved to protect hosts from reinfection, but incomplete responses that allow future reinfection might inadvertently select for more harmful pathogens. We present empirical and modeling evidence that incomplete immunity promotes the evolution of higher virulence in a natural host-pathogen system. We performed sequential infections of house finches with Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains of varying virulence. Virulent bacterial strains generated stronger host protection against reinfection than less virulent strains, and thus excluded less virulent strains...

Data from: Limited hatchery introgression into wild brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations despite reoccurring stocking

Shannon L. White, William L. Miller, Stephanie A. Dowell, Meredith L. Bartron & Tyler Wagner
Due to increased anthropogenic pressures on many fish populations, supplementing wild populations with captive-raised individuals has become an increasingly common management practice. Stocking programs can be controversial due to uncertainty about the long-term fitness effects of genetic introgression on wild populations. In particular, introgression between hatchery and wild individuals can cause declines in wild population fitness, resiliency, and adaptive potential, and contribute to local population extirpation. However, low survival and fitness of captive-raised individuals can...

Data from: Experimental evidence of long-term reproductive costs in a colonial nesting seabird

Aly McKnight, Erik J. Blomberg, Gregory H. Golet, David B. Irons, Cynthia S. Loftin & Shawn T. McKInney
Trade-offs between current and future reproduction are central to the evolution of life histories. Experiments that manipulate brood size provide an effective approach to investigating future costs of current reproduction. Most manipulative studies to date, however, have addressed only the short-term effects of brood size manipulation. Our goal was to determine whether survival or breeding costs of reproduction in a long-lived species manifest beyond the subsequent breeding season. To this end, we investigated long-term survival...

Data from: A spatially explicit hierarchical model to characterize population viability

Steven P. Campbell, Erin R. Zylstra, Catherine R. Darst, Roy C. Averill-Murray & Robert J. Steidl
Many of the processes that govern the viability of animal populations vary spatially, yet population viability analyses (PVAs) that account explicitly for spatial variation are rare. We develop a PVA model that incorporates autocorrelation into the analysis of local demographic information to produce spatially explicit estimates of demography and viability at relatively fine spatial scales across a large spatial extent. We use a hierarchical, spatial autoregressive model for capture-recapture data from multiple locations to obtain...

Data from: Landscape genetics identifies streams and drainage infrastructure as dispersal corridors for an endangered wetland bird

Charles B. Van Rees, J. Michael Reed, Robert E. Wilson, Jared G. Underwood & Sarah A. Sonsthagen
Anthropogenic alterations to landscape structure and composition can have significant impacts on biodiversity, potentially leading to species extinctions. Population-level impacts of landscape change are mediated by animal behaviors, in particular dispersal behavior. Little is known about the dispersal habits of rails (Rallidae) due to their cryptic behavior and tendency to occupy densely vegetated habitats. The effects of landscape structure on the movement behavior of waterbirds in general are poorly studied due to their reputation for...

Data from: Contemporary factors influencing genetic diversity in the Alaska humpback whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis complex

J. B. Olsen, R. J. Brown, O. L. Russ, K. Harper & J. K. Wenburg
Thirteen microsatellite loci were used to address three hypotheses regarding genetic diversity in the humpback whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis complex in Alaska. The test results provided further insight into the factors influencing C. clupeaformis complex population structure and level of genetic variation. First, themicrosatellite data did not provide evidence of two spatially distinct Beringian and Eurasian refugial groups as revealed in previous phylogeographic analyses ofmitochondrialDNAvari- ation. Rather, the population structure inferred from the microsatellite variation appears...

Data from: Rarity does not limit genetic variation or preclude subpopulation structure in the geographically restricted desert forb Astragalus lentiginosus var. piscinensis

Joshua G. Harrison, Matthew L. Forister, Stephanie R. Mcknight, Erin Nordin & Thomas L. Parchman
Premise of the study: Characteristics of rare taxa include small population sizes and limited geographical ranges. The genetic consequences of rarity are poorly understood for most taxa. A small geographical range could result in reduced opportunity for isolation by distance or environment, thereby limiting genetic structure and variation, but few studies explore genetic structure at small spatial scales with sufficient resolution to test this hypothesis. Moreover, few comparative genetic studies exist among infrataxa differing in...

Data from: Integrating encounter theory with decision analysis to evaluate collision risk and determine optimal protection zones for wildlife

Bradley J. Udell, Julien Martin, , Mathieu Bonneau, Holly Edwards, Timothy A. Gowan, Stacie K. Hardy, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Calleson, Charles J. Deutsch, Robert J. Fletcher & Charles S. Calleson
1. Better understanding human-wildlife interactions and their links with management can help improve the design of wildlife protection zones. One important example is the problem of wildlife collisions with vehicles or human-built structures (e.g. power lines, wind farms). In fact, collisions between marine wildlife and watercraft are among the major threats faced by several endangered species of marine mammals. Natural resource managers are therefore interested in finding cost-effective solutions to mitigate these threats. 2. We...

Data from: Avian demographic responses to drought and fire: a community-level perspective

James F. Saracco, Stephen M. Fettig, George L. San Miguel, David W. Mehlman, Brent E. Thompson & Steven K. Albert
Drought stress is an important consideration for wildlife in arid and semi-arid regions under climate change. Drought can impact plant and animal populations directly, through effects on their physiology, as well as indirectly through effects on vegetation productivity and resource availability, and by creating conditions conducive to secondary disturbance, such as wildfire. We implemented a novel approach to understanding community-level demographic responses of birds and their habitats to these stressors in the context of climate...

Data from: Linking beaver dam affected flow dynamics to upstream passage of Arctic grayling

Kyle A. Cutting, Jake M. Ferguson, Michelle L. Anderson, Kristen Cook, Stacy C. Davis & Rebekah Levine
Beaver reintroductions and beaver dam structures are an increasingly utilized ecological tool for rehabilitating degraded streams, yet beaver dams can potentially impact upstream fish migrations. We collected two years of data on Arctic grayling movement through a series of beaver dams in a low gradient mountain stream, utilizing radio-telemetry techniques, to determine how hydrology, dam characteristics, and fish attributes impeded passage and movement rates of spawning grayling. We compared fish movement between a “normal” flow...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • United States Fish and Wildlife Service
    14
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • Unity College
    1
  • Virginia–Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine
    1
  • The Institute for Bird Populations
    1
  • University of Wyoming
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • University of Maine
    1