9 Works

Data from: Delimiting tropical mountain ecoregions for conservation

Philip J. Platts, Neil D. Burgess, Roy E. Gereau, Jon C. Lovett, Andrew R. Marshall, Colin J. McClean, Petri K. E. Pellikka, Ruth D. Swetnam & Rob Marchant
Ecological regions aggregate habitats with similar biophysical characteristics within well-defined boundaries, providing spatially consistent platforms for monitoring, managing and forecasting the health of interrelated ecosystems. A major obstacle to the implementation of this approach is imprecise and inconsistent boundary placement. For globally important mountain regions such as the Eastern Arc (Tanzania and Kenya), where qualitative definitions of biophysical affinity are well established, rule-based methods for landform classification provide a straightforward solution to ambiguities in region...

Data from: Microsatellites for the marsh Fritillary butterfly: de novo transcriptome sequencing, and a comparison with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers

Melanie R. Smee, Yannick Pauchet, Paul Wilkinson, Brian Wee, Michael C. Singer, Richard H. Ffrench-Constant, David J. Hodgson & Alexander S. Mikheyev
BACKGROUND: Until recently the isolation of microsatellite markers from Lepidoptera has proved troublesome, expensive and time-consuming. Following on from a previous study of Edith's checkerspot butterfly, Euphydryas editha, we developed novel microsatellite markers for the vulnerable marsh fritillary butterfly, E. aurinia. Our goal was to optimize the process in order to reduce both time and cost relative to prevailing techniques. This was accomplished by using a combination of previously developed techniques: in silico mining of...

Data from: Understanding the basis of diminished gene flow between hybridizing chromosome races of the house mouse

Mabel D. Giménez, Thomas A. White, Heidi C. Hauffe, Thadsin Panithanarak & Jeremy B. Searle
Speciation may be promoted in hybrid zones if there is an interruption to gene flow between the hybridizing forms. For hybridizing chromosome races of the house mouse in Valtellina (Italy) distinguished by whole-arm chromosomal rearrangements, previous studies have shown that there is greater interruption to gene flow at the centromeres of chromosomes that differ between the races than at distal regions of the same chromosome or at the centromeres of other chromosomes. Here, by increasing...

Data from: Host-associated genomic differentiation in congeneric butterflies: now you see it, now you don’t

Alexander S. Mikheyev, Carolyn S. McBride, Ulrich G. Mueller, Camille Parmesan, Melanie R. Smee, Constanti Stefanescu, Brian Wee & Michael C. Singer
Ecotypic variation among populations may become associated with widespread genomic differentiation, but theory predicts that this should happen only under particular conditions of gene flow, selection and population size. In closely related species, we might expect the strength of host-associated genomic differentiation (HAD) to be correlated with the degree of phenotypic differentiation in host-adaptive traits. Using microsatellite and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers, and controlling for isolation by distance between populations, we sought HAD...

Data from: Divergent evolutionary processes associated with colonization of offshore islands

Natália Martínková, Ross Barnett, Thomas Cucchi, Rahel Struchen, Marine Pascal, Michel Pascal, Martin C. Fischer, Thomas Higham, Selina Brace, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jean-Pierre Quéré, Paul O'Higgins, Laurent Excoffier, Gerald Heckel, A. Rus Hoelzel, Keith M. Dobney & Jeremy B. Searle
Oceanic islands have been a test ground for evolutionary theory, but here, we focus on the possibilities for evolutionary study created by offshore islands. These can be colonized through various means and by a wide range of species, including those with low dispersal capabilities. We use morphology, modern and ancient sequences of cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite genotypes to examine colonization history and evolutionary change associated with occupation of the Orkney archipelago by the common...

Data from: Protection against a fungal pathogen conferred by the aphid facultative endosymbionts Rickettsia and Spiroplasma is expressed in multiple host genotypes and species and is not influenced by co-infection with another symbiont

Piotr Łukasik, Huifang Guo, Margriet Van Asch, Julia Ferrari & H. Charles J. Godfray
Many insects harbour facultative endosymbiotic bacteria, often more than one type at a time. These symbionts can have major effects on their hosts' biology, which may be modulated by the presence of other symbiont species and by the host's genetic background. We investigated these effects by transferring two sets of facultative endosymbionts (one Hamiltonella and Rickettsia, the other Hamiltonella and Spiroplasma) from naturally double-infected pea aphid hosts into five novel host genotypes of two aphid...

Data from: Relaxed phylogenetics and the Palaeoptera problem: resolving deep ancestral splits in the insect phylogeny

Jessica A. Thomas, John W. H. Trueman, Andrew Rambaut & John J. Welch
The order in which the three groups of winged insects diverged from their common ancestor has important implications for understanding the origin of insect flight. But despite this importance, the split between the Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), Ephemeroptera (mayflies) and Neoptera (the other winged orders) remains very much unresolved. Indeed, previous studies have obtained strong apparent support for each of the three possible branching patterns. Here, we present a systematic reinvestigation of the basal pterygote...

Data from: Evolution on the move: specialization on widespread resources associated with rapid range expansion in response to climate change

Jon R. Bridle, James Buckley, Edward J. Bodsworth & Chris D. Thomas
Generalist species and phenotypes are expected to perform best under rapid environmental change. In contrast to this view that generalists will inherit the Earth, we find that increased specialisation on a single host plant is associated with the recent climate-driven range expansion of the UK Brown Argus butterfly. Field assays of female host plant preference across the UK reveal a diversity of adaptations to host plants in long-established parts of the range, whereas butterflies in...

Data from: Rapidly fluctuating environments constrain coevolutionary arms races by impeding selective sweeps

Ellie Harrison, Anna-Liisa Laine, Mikael Hietala, Michael A. Brockhurst & A.-L. Laine
Although pervasive, the impact of temporal environmental heterogeneity on coevolutionary processes is poorly understood. Productivity is a key temporally heterogeneous variable, and increasing productivity has been shown to increase rates of antagonistic arms race coevolution, and lead to the evolution of more broadly resistant hosts and more broadly infectious parasites. We investigated the effects of the grain of environmental heterogeneity, in terms of fluctuations in productivity, on bacteria–phage coevolution. Our findings demonstrate that environmental heterogeneity...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of York
    9
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • University of Bristol
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • University of Twente
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1