7 Works

Data from: The effect of bioturbation by polychaetes (Opheliidae) on benthic foraminiferal assemblages and test preservation

José N. Pérez-Asensio, Julio Aguirre & Francisco J. Rodríguez-Tovar
Biological activity such as burrowing can alter benthic foraminiferal shell preservation and may also modify benthic foraminiferal assemblages by vertical mixing, inducing sediment homogenization. Here, we analyse benthic foraminiferal assemblages and taphonomy of upper Miocene marine deposits from Conil de la Frontera (Cádiz, south-western Spain). The deposits consist of marls displaying a pervasive alternation of intensively bioturbated beds dominated by Macaronichnus segregatis traces (ichnofabric index 4–5) and non-bioturbated beds. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages are dominated by...

Data from: Deliberation favours social efficiency by making people disregard their relative shares: evidence from USA and India

Valerio Capraro, Brice Corgnet, Antonio M. Espín & Roberto Hernán-González
Groups make decisions on both the production and the distribution of resources. These decisions typically involve a tension between increasing the total level of group resources (i.e. social efficiency) and distributing these resources among group members (i.e. individuals' relative shares). This is the case because the redistribution process may destroy part of the resources, thus resulting in socially inefficient allocations. Here we apply a dual-process approach to understand the cognitive underpinnings of this fundamental tension....

Data from: Great spotted cuckoo nestlings have no antipredatory effect on magpie or carrion crow host nests in southern Spain

Manuel Soler, Liesbeth De Neve, María Roldán, Tomás Pérez-Contreras & Juan J. Soler
Host defences against cuckoo parasitism and cuckoo trickeries to overcome them are a classic example of antagonistic coevolution. Recently it has been reported that this relationship may turn to be mutualistic in the case of the carrion crow (Corvus corone) and its brood parasite, the great spotted cuckoo (Clamator glandarius), given that experimentally and naturally parasitized nests were depredated at a lower rate than non-parasitized nests. This result was interpreted as a consequence of the...

Data from: Invasive earthworms erode soil biodiversity: a meta-analysis

Olga Ferlian, Nico Eisenhauer, Martin Aguirrebengoa, Mariama Camara, Irene Ramirez-Rojas, Fabio Santos, Krizler Tanalgo & Madhav P. Thakur
1. Biological invasions pose a serious threat to biodiversity and ecosystem functioning across ecosystems. Invasions by ecosystem engineers, in particular, have been shown to have dramatic effects in recipient ecosystems. For instance, invasion by earthworms, a belowground invertebrate ecosystem engineer, in previously earthworm-free ecosystems dramatically alters the physico-chemical characteristics of the soil. Studies have shown that such alterations in the soil can have far-reaching impacts on soil organisms, which form a major portion of terrestrial...

Data from: Parasites structuring ecological communities: the mistletoe footprint in Mediterranean pine forests

Ana Mellado & Regino Zamora
1. The capacity of parasitic plants in structuring natural communities is increasingly recognized. These plants can affect the structure, composition and productivity of plant communities by modifying the competitive balance between hosts and non-host species and by altering the quantity and quality of resources entering the soil. Despite the progress made in this field, there is still a lack of integrative studies showing the structuring capacity of parasitic plants in forest ecosystems, where their effect...

Data from: De novo active sites for resurrected Precambrian enzymes

Valeria A. Risso, Sergio Martinez Rodriguez, Adela M. Candel, Dennis M. Krüger, David Pantoja-Uceda, Mariano Ortega-Munoz, Francisco Santoyo-Gonzalez, Eric A. Gaucher, Shina Caroline Lynn Kamerlin, Marta Bruix, Jose A. Gavira & Jose M. Sanchez-Ruiz
Protein engineering studies often suggest the emergence of completely new enzyme functionalities to be highly improbable. However, enzymes likely catalysed many different reactions already in the last universal common ancestor. Mechanisms for the emergence of completely new active sites must therefore either plausibly exist or at least have existed at the primordial protein stage. Here, we use resurrected Precambrian proteins as scaffolds for protein engineering and demonstrate that a new active site can be generated...

Data from: Host nest site choice depends on risk of cuckoo parasitism in magpie hosts

Mónica Expósito-Granados, Deseada Parejo, Juan Gabriel Martínez, Marta Precioso, Mercedes Molina-Morales & Jesús M. Avilés
Avian brood parasites impose large fitness costs on their hosts and, thus, brood parasitism has selected for an array of host defensive mechanisms to avoid them. So far most studies have focused on antiparasite defenses operating at the egg and chick stages and neglected defenses that may work prior to parasite egg deposition. Here, we experimentally explore the possibility that hosts, as part of a front-line defense, might minimize parasitism costs through informed nest site...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • University of Granada
    7
  • Spanish National Research Council
    2
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • University of Nottingham
    1
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    1
  • University of Southampton
    1
  • University of Geneva
    1
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    1
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    1