405 Works

Data from: Introduced bees (Osmia cornifrons) collect pollen from both coevolved and novel host-plant species within their family-level phylogenetic preferences

Anthony Vaudo, David Biddinger, Wiebke Sickel, Alexander Keller & Margarita M Lopez-Uribe
Studying the pollen preferences of introduced bees allows us to investigate how species utilize host-plants when establishing in new environments. Osmia cornifrons is a solitary bee introduced into North America from East-Asia for pollination of crops in the Rosaceae. We investigated whether O. cornifrons 1) more frequently collected pollen from host-plant species they coevolved with from their geographic origin, or 2) prefer hosts-plant species of specific plant taxa independent of origin. To address this question,...

Data from: Phylogenetic clustering of origination and extinction across the Late Ordovician mass extinction

Andrew Z. Krug & Mark E. Patzkowsky
Mass extinctions can have dramatic effects on the trajectory of life, but in some cases the effects can be relatively small even when extinction rates are high. For example, the Late Ordovician mass extinction is the second most severe in terms of the proportion of genera eliminated, yet is noted for the lack of ecological consequences and shifts in clade dominance. By comparison, the end-Cretaceous mass extinction was less severe but eliminated several major clades...

Data from: Tc-MYBPA an Arabidopsis TT2-like transcription factor and functions in the regulation of proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao

Yi Liu, Zi Shi, Siela N. Maximova, Mark J. Payne & Mark J. Guiltinan
Background: The flavan-3-ols catechin and epicatechin, and their polymerized oligomers, the proanthocyanidins (PAs, also called condensed tannins), accumulate to levels of up to 15 % of the total weight of dry seeds of Theobroma cacao L. These compounds have been associated with several health benefits in humans. They also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. In Arabidopsis, the R2R3 type MYB transcription factor TT2 regulates the major genes leading to...

Data from: Archaeogenomic evidence from the southwestern US points to a pre-Hispanic scarlet macaw breeding colony

Richard J. George, Stephen Plof, Adam S. Watson, Kari L. Schmidt, Brandon J. Culleton, Thomas K. Harper, Patricia A. Gilman, Steven A. LeBlanc, George Amato, Peter Whiteley, Logan Kistler & Douglas J. Kennett
Hundreds of scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera) skeletons have been recovered from archaeological contexts in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico (SW/NW). The location of these skeletons, >1,000 km outside their Neotropical endemic range, has suggested a far-reaching pre-Hispanic acquisition network. Clear evidence for scarlet macaw breeding within this network is only known from the settlement of Paquimé in NW dating between 1250 and 1450 CE. Although some scholars have speculated on the probable...

Data from: Ammonia volatilization from putting greens foliarly-fertilized by conventional or stabilized urea

Maxim J. Schlossberg, Benjamin A. McGraw & Ryan L. Sebring
Low cost, high N-content, and favorable handling characteristics of urea fertilizer (46-0-0) make its use common in turfgrass management. While many investigations confirm incomplete recovery of foliarly-applied urea-N by turfgrass putting greens, the efficacy of urease-inhibiting additives, calcium-maleic-itaconic polymer or N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT), in preventing NH3 volatilization is currently undocumented. Meanwhile, NH3 emissions reduce air and water quality. From 2014 to 2015, NH3 volatilization was measured 0- to 24-hours following foliar application of conventional...

Data from: The effects of agent hybridization on the efficacy of biological control of tansy ragwort at high elevations

Marianna Szucs, Patricia E. Salerno, Brittany J. Teller, Urs Schaffner, Jeffrey L. Littlefield & Ruth A. Hufbauer
The success rate of weed biological control programs is difficult to evaluate and the factors affecting it remain poorly understood. One aspect which is still unclear is whether releases of multiple, genetically distinct populations of a biological control agent increase the likelihood of success, either by independent colonization of different environmental niches or by hybridization that may increase the agent’s fitness and adaptive ability. Since hybridization is often invoked to explain the success of unintentionally...

Data from: A homeotic shift late in development drives mimetic color variation in a bumble bee

Li Tian, Sarthok Rasique Rahman, Briana D. Ezray, Luca Franzini, James P. Strange, Patrick Lhomme & Heather M. Hines
Natural phenotypic radiations, with their high diversity and convergence, are well-suited for informing how genomic changes translate to natural phenotypic variation. New genomic tools enable discovery in such traditionally non-model systems. Here, we characterize the genomic basis of color pattern variation in bumble bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Bombus), a group that has undergone extensive convergence of setal color patterns as a result of Müllerian mimicry. In western North America, multiple species converge on local mimicry patterns...

Data from: A trait-based approach to predict population genetic structure in bees

Margarita M. Lopez-Uribe, Shalene Jha & Antonella Soro
Understanding population genetic structure is key to developing predictions about species susceptibility to environmental change, such as habitat fragmentation and climate change. It has been theorized that life-history traits may constrain some species in their dispersal and lead to greater signatures of population genetic structure. In this study, we use a quantitative comparative approach to assess if patterns of population genetic structure in bees are driven by three key species-level life-history traits: body size, sociality,...

Data from: Large-scale recovery of an endangered amphibian despite ongoing exposure to multiple stressors

Roland A. Knapp, Gary M. Fellers, Patrick M. Kleeman, David A. W. Miller, Vance T. Vredenburg, Erica Bree Rosenblum & Cheryl J. Briggs
Amphibians are one of the most threatened animal groups, with 32% of species at risk for extinction. Given this imperiled status, is the disappearance of a large fraction of the Earth’s amphibians inevitable, or are some declining species more resilient than is generally assumed? We address this question in a species that is emblematic of many declining amphibians, the endangered Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog (Rana sierrae). Based on >7,000 frog surveys conducted across Yosemite National...

Data from: Crop production in the USA is frequently limited by a lack of pollinators

James Reilly, Derek Artz, David Biddinger, Kyle Bobiwash, Natalie Boyle, Claire Brittain, Julia Brokaw, Josh Campbell, Jaret Daniels, Elizabeth Elle, Jamie Ellis, Shelby Fleischer, Jason Gibbs, Robert Gillespie, Knute Gundersen, Larry Gut, George Hoffman, Neelendra Joshi, Ola Lundin, Keith Mason, Carley McGrady, Steve Peterson, Theresa Pitts-Singer, Sujaya Rao, Nikki Rothwell … & Rachael Winfree
Most of the world’s crops depend on pollinators, so declines in both managed and wild bees raise concerns about food security. However, the degree to which insect pollination is actually limiting current crop production is poorly understood, as is the role of wild species (as opposed to managed honey bees) in pollinating crops, particularly in intensive production areas. We established a nation-wide study to assess the extent of pollinator limitation in seven crops at 131...

Vermivora photographs in plumage genomic study

Marcella Baiz, Gunnar Kramer, Henry Streby, Scott Taylor, Irby Lovette & David Toews
Hybrids with different combinations of traits can be used to identify the genomic regions that underlie phenotypic characters important to species identity and recognition. Here we explore links between genomic and plumage variation in Blue-winged Warbler x Golden-winged Warbler hybrids, which have traditionally been categorized into two discrete types. "Lawrence’s Warbler" hybrids are very yellow overall, similar to Blue-winged Warblers, but exhibit the black throat patch and face mask of Golden-winged Warblers. "Brewster’s Warbler" hybrids...

Data from: How gut microbiome interactions affect nutritional traits of Drosophila melanogaster

, Grace Peters-Schulze, Jingwei Cai, Andrew D. Patterson & Angela E. Douglas
Most research on the impact of the gut microbiome on animal nutrition is designed to identify the effects of single microbial taxa and single metabolites of microbial origin, without considering the potentially complex network of interactions among co-occurring microorganisms. Here, we investigate how different microbial associations and their fermentation products affect host nutrition, using Drosophila melanogaster colonized with three gut microorganisms (the bacteria Acetobacter fabarum and Lactobacillus brevis and the yeast Hanseniaspora uvarum) in all...

Ecosystem services enhanced through soundscape management link people and wildlife

Mitch Levenhagen, Zachary Miller, Alissa Petrelli, Lauren Ferguson, Yau-Huo Shr, Dylan Gomes, Derrick Taff, Crow White, Kurt Fristrup, Christopher Monz, Christopher McClure, Peter Newman, Clinton Francis & Jesse Barber
Burgeoning urbanization, development and human activities have led to reduced opportunities for nature experience in quiet acoustic environments. Increasing noise affects both humans and wildlife alike. We experimentally altered human-caused sound levels in a paired study using informational signs that encouraged quiet behaviours in week-on, week-off blocks on the trail system of Muir Woods National Monument, California, USA to test if the soundscape influences both wildlife and human experiences. Using continuous measurements from acoustic recording...

Data from: Spatially structured statistical network models for landscape genetics

Erin E. Peterson, Ephraim M. Hanks, Mevin B. Hooten, Jay M. Ver Hoef & Marie-Josée Fortin
A basic understanding of how the landscape impedes, or creates resistance to, the dispersal of organisms and hence gene flow is paramount for successful conservation science and management. Spatially structured ecological networks are often used to represent spatial landscape-genetic relationships, where nodes represent individuals or populations and resistance to movement is represented using non-binary edge weights. Weights are typically assigned or estimated by the user, rather than observed, and validating such weights is challenging. We...

Population decline of a long-distance migratory passerine at the edge of its range: nest predation, nest replacement, and immigration

Michael Murphy, Lucas Redmond, Amy Dolan, Nathan Cooper, Christopher Chutter & Sarah Cancellieri
The relative importance of predators and resources (i.e., food) for the dynamics of migratory bird populations is poorly known. Resource availability may be more likely in resource poor environments, but given that nest failure in most systems is due mainly to predation, predator effects may predominate. We document a rapid decline of an isolated Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) population breeding in the Great Basin Desert of eastern Oregon, USA, and evaluate whether it was driven...

Data from: Folding wings like a cockroach: a review of transverse wing folding ensign wasps (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae: Afrevania and Trissevania)

István Mikó, Robert S. Copeland, James P. Balhoff, Matthew J. Yoder & Andrew R. Deans
We revise two relatively rare ensign wasp genera, whose species are restricted to Sub-Saharan Africa: Afrevania and Trissevania. Afrevania longipetiolata sp. nov., Trissevania heatherae sp. nov., T. hugoi sp. nov., T. mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. slideri sp. nov. are described, males and females of T. anemotis and Afrevania leroyi are redescribed, and an identification key for Trissevaniini is provided. We argue that Trissevania mrimaensis sp. nov. and T. heatherae sp. nov. populations are vulnerable,...

Data from: The evolutionary consequences of blood-stage vaccination on the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi

Victoria C. Barclay, Derek Sim, Brian H. K. Chan, Lucas A. Nell, Maia A. Rabaa, Andrew S. Bell, Robin F. Anders & Andrew F. Read
Malaria vaccine developers are concerned that antigenic escape will erode vaccine efficacy. Evolutionary theorists have raised the possibility that some types of vaccine could also create conditions favoring the evolution of more virulent pathogens. Such evolution would put unvaccinated people at greater risk of severe disease. Here we test the impact of vaccination with a single highly purified antigen on the malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi evolving in laboratory mice. The antigen we used, AMA-1, is...

Data from: Postural stability margins as a function of support surface slopes

Aviroop Dutt-Mazumder, Seymon M. Slobounov, John Henry Challis & Karl Maxim Newell
This investigation examined the effects of slope of the surface of support (35°, 30°, 20°, 10° Facing(Toe) Down, 0° Flat and 10°, 20°, 25° Facing (Toe) Up) and postural orientation on the margins of postural stability in quiet standing of young adults. The findings showed that the center of pressure—CoP (displacement, area and length) had least motion at the baseline (0° Flat) platform condition that progressively increased as a function of platform angle in both...

Data from: A phylogeny of the treehopper subfamily Heteronotinae reveals convergent pronotal traits (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Membracidae)

Olivia Evangelista, Albino M. Sakakibara, Jason R. Cryan & Julie M. Urban
Even within an insect family famous for its morphological diversity, the treehopper subfamily Heteronotinae is a microcosm of pronotal variation, displaying remarkably dissimilar thoracic ornamentations among its ten included genera. Presented here is a reconstruction of heteronotine relationships based on DNA nucleotide sequence data from five nuclear and two mitochondrial genes from a comprehensive sample of ingroup taxa (including exemplars of all genera except for the monotypic Dysyncritus Fowler, 1895). Concordant phylogenetic estimates support the...

Data from: Wolbachia infection alters the relative abundance of resident bacteria in adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, but not larvae

Michelle D. Audsley, Andrei Seleznev, D. Albert Joubert, Megan Woolfit, Scott L. O'Neill & Elizabeth A. McGraw
Insect-symbiont interactions are known to play key roles in host functions and fitness. The common insect endosymbiont Wolbachia can reduce the ability of several human pathogens, including arboviruses and the malaria parasite, to replicate in insect hosts. Wolbachia does not naturally infect Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue virus, but transinfected Ae. aegypti have anti-dengue virus properties and are currently being trialled as a dengue biocontrol strategy. Here, we assess the impact of Wolbachia...

Data from: Symbiotic polydnavirus of a parasite manipulates caterpillar and plant immunity

Ching-Wen Tan, Michelle Peiffer, Kelli Hoover, Cristina Rosa, Flor E. Acevedo & Gary W. Felton
Obligate symbioses occur when organisms require symbiotic relationships to survive. Some parasitic wasps of caterpillars possess obligate mutualistic viruses called “polydnaviruses.” Along with eggs, wasps inject polydnavirus inside their caterpillar hosts where the hatching larvae develop inside the caterpillar. Polydnaviruses suppress the immune systems of their caterpillar hosts, which enables egg hatch and wasp larval development. It is unknown whether polydnaviruses also manipulate the salivary proteins of the caterpillar, which may affect the elicitation of...

Data from: Plant reproductive strategies vary under low and high pollinator densities

Junpeng Mu, Qinggui Wu, Yulian Yang, Mei Huang & Christina M. Grozinger
Long-term variation in the population density of honey bees (Apis mellifera) across landscapes has been shown to correlate with variation in the floral traits of plant populations in these landscapes, suggesting that variations in pollinator population density and foraging rates can drive floral trait evolution of their host plants. However, it remained to be determined whether this variation in plant traits is associated with adaptive variation in plant reproductive strategies under conditions of high and...

Data from: Two-species occupancy modeling accounting for species misidentification and nondetection

Thierry Chambert, Evan H. Campbell Grant, David A. W. Miller, James D. Nichols, Kevin P. Mulder & Adrianne B. Brand
1.In occupancy studies, species misidentification can lead to false positive detections, which can cause severe estimator biases. Currently, all models that account for false positive errors only consider omnibus sources of false detections and are limited to single species occupancy. 2.However, false detections for a given species often occur because of the misidentification with another, closely-related species. To exploit this explicit source of false positive detection error, we develop a two-species occupancy model that accounts...

Sociability increases survival of adult female giraffes

Monica Bond, Derek Lee, Damien Farine, Arpat Ozgul & Barbara Koenig
Studies increasingly show that social connectedness plays a key role in determining survival, in addition to natural and anthropogenic environmental factors. Few studies, however, integrated social, non-social, and demographic data to elucidate what components of an animal’s socio-ecological environment are most important to their survival. Female giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) form structured societies with highly dynamic group membership but stable long-term associations. We examined the relative contributions of sociability (relationship strength, gregariousness, and betweenness), together with...

Bottom-up coarse-grained models for external fields and interfaces

M.R. DeLyser & W.G. Noid
These simulations were used to parameterize coarse-grained models of interfacial systems of methanol subject to an external potential and to evaluate these models.

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