30 Works

Data from: Large-scale recovery of an endangered amphibian despite ongoing exposure to multiple stressors

Roland A. Knapp, Gary M. Fellers, Patrick M. Kleeman, David A. W. Miller, Vance T. Vredenburg, Erica Bree Rosenblum & Cheryl J. Briggs
Amphibians are one of the most threatened animal groups, with 32% of species at risk for extinction. Given this imperiled status, is the disappearance of a large fraction of the Earth’s amphibians inevitable, or are some declining species more resilient than is generally assumed? We address this question in a species that is emblematic of many declining amphibians, the endangered Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog (Rana sierrae). Based on >7,000 frog surveys conducted across Yosemite National...

Data from: The evolutionary consequences of blood-stage vaccination on the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi

Victoria C. Barclay, Derek Sim, Brian H. K. Chan, Lucas A. Nell, Maia A. Rabaa, Andrew S. Bell, Robin F. Anders & Andrew F. Read
Malaria vaccine developers are concerned that antigenic escape will erode vaccine efficacy. Evolutionary theorists have raised the possibility that some types of vaccine could also create conditions favoring the evolution of more virulent pathogens. Such evolution would put unvaccinated people at greater risk of severe disease. Here we test the impact of vaccination with a single highly purified antigen on the malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi evolving in laboratory mice. The antigen we used, AMA-1, is...

Data from: Postural stability margins as a function of support surface slopes

Aviroop Dutt-Mazumder, Seymon M. Slobounov, John Henry Challis & Karl Maxim Newell
This investigation examined the effects of slope of the surface of support (35°, 30°, 20°, 10° Facing(Toe) Down, 0° Flat and 10°, 20°, 25° Facing (Toe) Up) and postural orientation on the margins of postural stability in quiet standing of young adults. The findings showed that the center of pressure—CoP (displacement, area and length) had least motion at the baseline (0° Flat) platform condition that progressively increased as a function of platform angle in both...

Data from: A phylogeny of the treehopper subfamily Heteronotinae reveals convergent pronotal traits (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Membracidae)

Olivia Evangelista, Albino M. Sakakibara, Jason R. Cryan & Julie M. Urban
Even within an insect family famous for its morphological diversity, the treehopper subfamily Heteronotinae is a microcosm of pronotal variation, displaying remarkably dissimilar thoracic ornamentations among its ten included genera. Presented here is a reconstruction of heteronotine relationships based on DNA nucleotide sequence data from five nuclear and two mitochondrial genes from a comprehensive sample of ingroup taxa (including exemplars of all genera except for the monotypic Dysyncritus Fowler, 1895). Concordant phylogenetic estimates support the...

Data from: Attraction, oviposition and larval survival of the fungus gnat, Lycoriella ingenua, on fungal species isolated from adults, larvae, and mushroom compost

Kevin R. Cloonan, Stefanos S. Andreadis, Haibin Chen, Nina E. Jenkins & Thomas C. Baker
We previously showed that the females of the mushroom sciarid, Lycoriella ingenua (Dufour, 1839) (Diptera: Sciaridae), one of the most severe pests of the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus (J.E. Lange) Emil J. Imbach (Agaricales: Agaricaceae), are attracted to the mushroom compost that mushrooms are grown on and not to the mushrooms themselves. We also showed that females are attracted to the parasitic green mold, Trichoderma aggressivum. In an attempt to identify what is...

Data from: Island-wide aridity did not trigger recent megafaunal extinctions in Madagascar

Brooke E. Crowley, Laurie R. Godfrey, Richard J. Bankoff, George H. Perry, Brendan J. Culleton, Douglas J. Kennett, Michael R. Sutherland, Karen E. Samonds & David A. Burney
Researchers are divided about the relative importance of people versus climate in triggering the Late Holocene extinctions of the endemic large-bodied fauna on the island of Madagascar. Specifically, a dramatic and synchronous decline in arboreal pollen and increase in grass pollen ca. 1,000 years ago has been alternatively interpreted as evidence for aridification, increased human activity, or both. As aridification and anthropogenic deforestation can have similar effects on vegetation, resolving which of these factors (if...

Data from: Sexual selection on male vocal fundamental frequency in humans and other anthropoids

David A. Puts, Alexander K. Hill, Drew H. Bailey, Robert S. Walker, Drew Rendall, John R. Wheatley, Lisa L. M. Welling, Khytam Dawood, Rodrigo A. Cárdenas, Robert P. Burriss, Nina G. Jablonski, Mark D. Shriver, Daniel J. Weiss, Adriano R. Lameira, Coren L. Apicella, Michael J. Owren, Claudia Barelli, Mary E. Glenn & Gabriel Ramos-Fernandez
In many primates, including humans, the vocalizations of males and females differ dramatically, with male vocalizations and vocal anatomy often seeming to exaggerate apparent body size. These traits may be favoured by sexual selection because low-frequency male vocalizations intimidate rivals and/or attract females, but this hypothesis has not been systematically tested across primates, nor is it clear why competitors and potential mates should attend to vocalization frequencies. Here we show across anthropoids that sexual dimorphism...

Data from: How old are you? Genet age estimates in a clonal animal

Meghann K. Devlin-Durante, Margaret W. Miller, Caribbean Acropora Research Group, William F. Precht & Iliana B. Baums
Foundation species such as redwoods, seagrasses and corals are often long-lived and clonal. Genets may consist of hundreds of members (ramets) and originated hundreds to thousands of years ago. As climate change and other stressors exert selection pressure on species, the demography of populations changes. Yet, because size does not indicate age in clonal organisms, demographic models are missing data necessary to predict the resilience of many foundation species. Here, we correlate somatic mutations with...

Data from: Implied weighting and its utility in palaeontological datasets: a study using modelled phylogenetic matrices

Curtis R. Congreve & James C. Lamsdell
Implied weighting, a method for phylogenetic inference that actively seeks to downweight supposed homoplasy, has in recent years begun to be widely utilized in palaeontological datasets. Given the method's purported ability at handling widespread homoplasy/convergence, we investigate the effects of implied weighting on modelled phylogenetic data. We generated 100 character matrices consisting of 55 characters each using a Markov Chain morphology model of evolution based on a known phylogenetic tree. Rates of character evolution in...

Data from: The Achilles' heel hypothesis: misinformed keystone individuals impair collective learning and reduce group success

Jonathan Pruitt, Colin Wright, Carl Keiser, Alexander DeMarco, Matt Grobis, Noa Pinter-Wollman, Matthew M. Grobis, Alex E. DeMarco, Carl N. Keiser, Jonathan N. Pruitt & Colin M. Wright
Many animal societies rely on highly influential keystone individuals for proper functioning. When information quality is important for group success, such keystone individuals have the potential to diminish group performance if they possess inaccurate information. Here we test whether information quality (accurate or inaccurate) influences collective outcomes when keystone individuals are the first to acquire it. We trained keystone or generic individuals to attack or avoid novel stimuli and implanted these seed individuals within groups...

Data from: Chemical communication is not sufficient to explain reproductive inhibition in the bumblebee Bombus impatiens

Mario Padilla, Etya Amsalem, Naomi Altman, Abraham Hefetz & Christina M. Grozinger
Reproductive division of labour is a hallmark of eusociality, but disentangling the underlying proximate mechanisms can be challenging. In bumblebees, workers isolated from the queen can activate their ovaries and lay haploid, male eggs. We investigated if volatile, contact, visual or behavioural cues produced by the queen or brood mediate reproductive dominance in Bombus impatiens. Exposure to queen-produced volatiles, brood-produced volatiles and direct contact with pupae did not reduce worker ovary activation; only direct contact...

Data from: Species interactions and the effects of climate variability on a wetland amphibian metacommunity

Courtney L. Davis, David A.W. Miller, Susan C. Walls, William J. Barichivich, Jeffrey W. Riley, Mary E. Brown & David A. W. Miller
Disentangling the role that multiple interacting factors have on species responses to shifting climate poses a significant challenge. However, our ability to do so is of utmost importance to predict the effects of climate change on species distributions. We examined how populations of three species of wetland breeding amphibians, which varied in life history requirements, responded to a six-year period of extremely variable in precipitation. This interval was punctuated by both extensive drought and heavy...

Data from: Trade-offs and tritrophic consequences of host shifts in specialized root herbivores

Jared G. Ali & Anurag A. Agrawal
Trade-offs in an herbivore's ability to feed, avoid predation and succeed on alternative hosts are thought to be major driving factors in host specialization. In this study, we compared how two closely related milkweed beetles (Tetraopes spp.) that have specialized on separate Asclepias species respond to host switching to alternative milkweed plants. By additionally examining effects on the beetles’ entomopathogenic natural enemies, we test whether host plant specialization is driven by plant–herbivore interactions alone or...

Data from: Inferring muscle functional roles of the ostrich pelvic limb during walking and running using computer optimization

Jeffery W. Rankin, Jonas Rubenson & John R. Hutchinson
Owing to their cursorial background, ostriches (Struthio camelus) walk and run with high metabolic economy, can reach very fast running speeds and quickly execute cutting manoeuvres. These capabilities are believed to be a result of their ability to coordinate muscles to take advantage of specialized passive limb structures. This study aimed to infer the functional roles of ostrich pelvic limb muscles during gait. Existing gait data were combined with a newly developed musculoskeletal model to...

Data from: Decades of field data reveal that turtles senesce in the wild

Daniel A. Warner, David A. W. Miller, Anne M. Bronikowski & Fredric J. Janzen
Lifespan and aging rates vary considerably across taxa; thus, understanding the factors that lead to this variation is a primary goal in biology and has ramifications for understanding constraints and flexibility in human aging. Theory predicts that senescence—declining reproduction and increasing mortality with advancing age—evolves when selection against harmful mutations is weaker at old ages relative to young ages or when selection favors pleiotropic alleles with beneficial effects early in life despite late-life costs. However,...

Data from: Larval food quantity affects the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit human malaria

Lillian L. M. Shapiro, Courtney C. Murdock, Gregory R. Jacobs, Rachel J. Thomas & Matthew B. Thomas
Adult traits of holometabolous insects are shaped by conditions experienced during larval development, which might impact interactions between adult insect hosts and parasites. However, the ecology of larval insects that vector disease remains poorly understood. Here, we used Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes and the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, to investigate whether larval conditions affect the capacity of adult mosquitoes to transmit malaria. We reared larvae in two groups; one group received a standard laboratory rearing...

Data from:A computational study of cancer hyperthermia based on vascular magnetic nanoconstructs

Mahdi Nabil & Paolo Zunino
The application of hyperthermia to cancer treatment is studied using a novel model arising from the fundamental principles of flow, mass and heat transport in biological tissues. The model is defined at the scale of the tumour microenvironment and an advanced computational scheme called the embedded multiscale method is adopted to solve the governing equations. More precisely, this approach involves modelling capillaries as one-dimensional channels carrying flow, and special mathematical operators are used to model...

Data from: Adaptation to warmer climates by parallel functional evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

J. Grey Monroe, Cullen McGovern, Jesse R. Lasky, Kelsi Grogan, James Beck & John K. McKay
The evolutionary processes and genetics underlying local adaptation at a specieswide level are largely unknown. Recent work has indicated that a frameshift mutation in a member of a family of transcription factors, C-repeat binding factors or CBFs, underlies local adaptation and freezing tolerance divergence between two European populations of Arabidopsis thaliana. To ask whether the specieswide evolution of CBF genes in Arabidopsis is consistent with local adaptation, we surveyed CBF variation from 477 wild accessions...

Data from: Symbiodinium glynnii sp. nov., a species of stress-tolerant symbiotic dinoflagellates from pocilloporid and montiporid corals in the Pacific Ocean

Drew C. Wham, Gang Ning & Todd C. LaJeunesse
A formal Symbiodinium species taxonomy enhances understanding of the physiology and ecology of coral–dinoflagellate symbioses. Here we formally define a new species of stress tolerant Symbiodinium in Clade D, Symbiodinium glynnii sp. nov. This species exhibits high host specificity for members of the stony coral genus Pocillopora in the Pacific Ocean and can also be found in symbiosis with the coral genera Seriatopora and Montipora. Symbiodinium glynnii is especially common in the Eastern Tropical and...

Data from: The first organ-based ontology for arthropods (Ontology of Arthropod Circulatory Systems - OArCS) and its integration into a novel formalization scheme for morphological descriptions

Christian S. Wirkner, Torben Göpel, Jens Runge, Jonas Keiler, Bastian-Jesper Klussmann-Fricke, Katarina Huckstorf, Stephan Scholz, István Mikó, Matthew J. Yoder & Stefan Richter
Morphology, the oldest discipline in the biosciences, is currently experiencing a renaissance in the field of comparative phenomics. However, morphological/phenotypic research still suffers on various levels from a lack of standards. This shortcoming, first highlighted as the “linguistic problem of morphology”, concerns the usage of terminology and also the need for formalization of morphological descriptions themselves, something of paramount importance not only to the field of morphology but also when it comes to the use...

Data from: Phylogenomic reconstruction of sportive lemurs (genus Lepilemur) recovered from mitogenomes with inferences for Madagascar biogeography

Runhua Lei, Cynthia L. Frasier, Melissa T.R. Hawkins, Shannon E. Engberg, Carolyn A. Bailey, Steig E. Johnson, Adam T. McLain, Colin P. Groves, George H. Perry, Stephen D. Nash, Russell A. Mittermeier &
The family Lepilemuridae includes 26 species of sportive lemurs, most of which were recently described. The cryptic morphological differences confounded taxonomy until recent molecular studies; however, some species’ boundaries remain uncertain. To better understand the genus Lepilemur, we analyzed 35 complete mitochondrial genomes representing all recognized 26 sportive lemur taxa and estimated divergence dates. With our dataset we recovered 25 reciprocally monophyletic lineages, as well as an admixed clade containing Lepilemur mittermeieri and Lepilemur dorsalis....

Data from: A hierarchical model of whole assemblage island biogeography

Jesse R. Lasky, Timothy H. Keitt, Brian C. Weeks & Evan P. Economo
Island systems have long played a central role in the development of ecology and evolutionary biology. However, while many empirical studies suggest species differ in vital biogeographic rates, such as dispersal abilities, quantitative methods have had difficulty incorporating such differences into analyses of whole-assemblages. In particular, differences in dispersal abilities among species can cause variation in the spatial clustering and localization of species distributions. Here, we develop a single, hierarchical Bayes, assemblage-wide model of 252...

Data from: Mechanistic model of evolutionary rate variation en route to a nonphotosynthetic lifestyle in plants

Susann Wicke, Kai F. Müller, Claude W. DePamphilis, Dietmar Quandt, Sidonie Bellot & Gerald M. Schneeweiss
Because novel environmental conditions alter the selection pressure on genes or entire subgenomes, adaptive and nonadaptive changes will leave a measurable signature in the genomes, shaping their molecular evolution. We present herein a model of the trajectory of plastid genome evolution under progressively relaxed functional constraints during the transition from autotrophy to a nonphotosynthetic parasitic lifestyle. We show that relaxed purifying selection in all plastid genes is linked to obligate parasitism, characterized by the parasite’s...

Data from: Impact of helminth infections and nutritional constraints on the small intestine microbiota

Isabella M. Cattadori, Aswathy Sebastian, Han Hao, Robab Katani, Istvan Albert, Kirsten E. Eilertson, Vivek Kapur, Ashutosh Pathak & Susan Mitchell
Helminth infections and nutrition can independently alter the composition and abundance of the gastrointestinal microbiota, however, their combined effect is poorly understood. Here, we used the T. retortaeformis-rabbit system to examine how the helminth infection and host restriction from coprophagy/ready-to-absorb nutrients affected the duodenal microbiota, and how these changes related to the acquired immune response at the site of infection. A factorial experiment was performed where the bacterial community, its functionality and the immune response...

Data from: Linking the respiration of fungal sporocarps with their nitrogen concentration: variation among species, tissues, and guilds

Lidia K. Trocha, Elzbieta Rudy, Weile Chen, Miroslawa Dabert & David M. Eissenstat
Tissue nitrogen (N) concentration has been correlated with respiration (RS) across plants of different life forms, functional and phylogenetic groups, plant organs and ectomycorrhizae of different fungal species. Nothing is known, however, if a similar relationship exists in other organisms like fungi. Here, we explored the N-RS relationship across sporocarps of 93 fungal species that varied in their guilds (mutualistic, saprotrophic, and parasitic) as well as “tissue” types (caps and stipes). We hypothesized that RS,...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    30

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    30

Affiliations

  • Pennsylvania State University
    30
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    2
  • Columbia University
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • University of Missouri
    2
  • Iowa State University
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1