43 Works

Data from: Archaeogenomic evidence from the southwestern US points to a pre-Hispanic scarlet macaw breeding colony

Richard J. George, Stephen Plof, Adam S. Watson, Kari L. Schmidt, Brandon J. Culleton, Thomas K. Harper, Patricia A. Gilman, Steven A. LeBlanc, George Amato, Peter Whiteley, Logan Kistler & Douglas J. Kennett
Hundreds of scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera) skeletons have been recovered from archaeological contexts in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico (SW/NW). The location of these skeletons, >1,000 km outside their Neotropical endemic range, has suggested a far-reaching pre-Hispanic acquisition network. Clear evidence for scarlet macaw breeding within this network is only known from the settlement of Paquimé in NW dating between 1250 and 1450 CE. Although some scholars have speculated on the probable...

Data from: Ammonia volatilization from putting greens foliarly-fertilized by conventional or stabilized urea

Maxim J. Schlossberg, Benjamin A. McGraw & Ryan L. Sebring
Low cost, high N-content, and favorable handling characteristics of urea fertilizer (46-0-0) make its use common in turfgrass management. While many investigations confirm incomplete recovery of foliarly-applied urea-N by turfgrass putting greens, the efficacy of urease-inhibiting additives, calcium-maleic-itaconic polymer or N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT), in preventing NH3 volatilization is currently undocumented. Meanwhile, NH3 emissions reduce air and water quality. From 2014 to 2015, NH3 volatilization was measured 0- to 24-hours following foliar application of conventional...

Data from: The effects of agent hybridization on the efficacy of biological control of tansy ragwort at high elevations

Marianna Szucs, Patricia E. Salerno, Brittany J. Teller, Urs Schaffner, Jeffrey L. Littlefield & Ruth A. Hufbauer
The success rate of weed biological control programs is difficult to evaluate and the factors affecting it remain poorly understood. One aspect which is still unclear is whether releases of multiple, genetically distinct populations of a biological control agent increase the likelihood of success, either by independent colonization of different environmental niches or by hybridization that may increase the agent’s fitness and adaptive ability. Since hybridization is often invoked to explain the success of unintentionally...

Data from: Spatially structured statistical network models for landscape genetics

Erin E. Peterson, Ephraim M. Hanks, Mevin B. Hooten, Jay M. Ver Hoef & Marie-Josée Fortin
A basic understanding of how the landscape impedes, or creates resistance to, the dispersal of organisms and hence gene flow is paramount for successful conservation science and management. Spatially structured ecological networks are often used to represent spatial landscape-genetic relationships, where nodes represent individuals or populations and resistance to movement is represented using non-binary edge weights. Weights are typically assigned or estimated by the user, rather than observed, and validating such weights is challenging. We...

Data from: Symbiotic polydnavirus of a parasite manipulates caterpillar and plant immunity

Ching-Wen Tan, Michelle Peiffer, Kelli Hoover, Cristina Rosa, Flor E. Acevedo & Gary W. Felton
Obligate symbioses occur when organisms require symbiotic relationships to survive. Some parasitic wasps of caterpillars possess obligate mutualistic viruses called “polydnaviruses.” Along with eggs, wasps inject polydnavirus inside their caterpillar hosts where the hatching larvae develop inside the caterpillar. Polydnaviruses suppress the immune systems of their caterpillar hosts, which enables egg hatch and wasp larval development. It is unknown whether polydnaviruses also manipulate the salivary proteins of the caterpillar, which may affect the elicitation of...

Data from: Plant reproductive strategies vary under low and high pollinator densities

Junpeng Mu, Qinggui Wu, Yulian Yang, Mei Huang & Christina M. Grozinger
Long-term variation in the population density of honey bees (Apis mellifera) across landscapes has been shown to correlate with variation in the floral traits of plant populations in these landscapes, suggesting that variations in pollinator population density and foraging rates can drive floral trait evolution of their host plants. However, it remained to be determined whether this variation in plant traits is associated with adaptive variation in plant reproductive strategies under conditions of high and...

Data from: Two-species occupancy modeling accounting for species misidentification and nondetection

Thierry Chambert, Evan H. Campbell Grant, David A. W. Miller, James D. Nichols, Kevin P. Mulder & Adrianne B. Brand
1.In occupancy studies, species misidentification can lead to false positive detections, which can cause severe estimator biases. Currently, all models that account for false positive errors only consider omnibus sources of false detections and are limited to single species occupancy. 2.However, false detections for a given species often occur because of the misidentification with another, closely-related species. To exploit this explicit source of false positive detection error, we develop a two-species occupancy model that accounts...

Data from: Quantifying the effects of temperature on mosquito and parasite traits that determine the transmission potential of human malaria

Lillian L. M. Shapiro, Shelley A. Whitehead & Matthew B. Thomas
Malaria transmission is known to be strongly impacted by temperature. Current understanding of how temperature affects mosquito and parasite life history traits derives from a limited number of empirical studies. These studies, some dating back to the early part of last century, are often poorly controlled, have limited replication, explore a narrow range of temperatures and use a mixture of parasite and mosquito species. Here, we use a single pairing of the Asian mosquito vector,...

Data from: Effects of mass extinction and recovery dynamics on long-term evolutionary trends: a morphological study of Strophomenida (Brachiopoda) across the Late Ordovician mass extinction

Judith A. Sclafani, Curtis R. Congreve, Andrew Z. Krug & Mark E. Patzkowsky
Mass extinctions affect the history of life by decimating existing diversity and ecological structure and creating new evolutionary and ecological pathways. Both the loss of diversity during these events and the rebound in diversity following extinction had a profound effect on Phanerozoic evolutionary trends. Phylogenetic trees can be used to robustly assess the evolutionary implications of extinction and origination. We examine both extinction and origination during the Late Ordovician mass extinction. This mass extinction was...

Data from: The impact of within-host ecology on the fitness of a drug-resistant parasite

Silvie Huijben, Brian H K Chan, William A Nelson & Andrew F Read
Background and objectives: The rate of evolution of drug resistance depends on the fitness of resistant pathogens. The fitness of resistant pathogens is reduced by competition with sensitive pathogens in untreated hosts and so enhanced by competitive release in drug-treated hosts. We set out to estimate the magnitude of those effects on a variety of fitness measures, hypothesizing that competitive suppression and competitive release would have larger impacts when resistance was rarer to begin with....

Data from: Acquisition of obligate mutualist symbionts during the larval stage is not beneficial for a coral host

Aaron Hartmann, Kristen Marhaver, Anke Klueter, Michael Lovci, Collin Closek, Erika Diaz Almeyda, Valerie Chamberland, Frederick Archer, Dimitri Deheyn, Mark Vermeij & Monica Medina
Theory suggests that the direct transmission of endosymbionts from parents to offspring (vertical transmission) in animal hosts is advantageous and evolutionarily stable, yet many host species instead acquire their symbionts from the environment (horizontal acquisition). An outstanding question in marine biology is why some scleractinian corals do not provision their eggs and larvae with the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates that are necessary for a juvenile’s ultimate survival. We tested whether the acquisition of photosynthetic endosymbionts (family Symbiodiniaceae)...

Data from: Systematic revision of Symbiodiniaceae highlights the antiquity and diversity of coral endosymbionts

Todd C. LaJeunesse, John Everett Parkinson, Paul W. Gabrielson, Hae Jin Jeong, James Davis Reimer, Christian R. Voolstra & Scott R. Santos
The advent of molecular data has transformed the science of organizing and studying life on Earth. Genetics-based evidence provides fundamental insights into the diversity, ecology, and origins of many biological systems, including the mutualisms between metazoan hosts and their micro-algal partners. A well-known example is the dinoflagellate endosymbionts (“zooxanthellae”) that power the growth of stony corals and coral reef ecosystems. Once assumed to encompass a single panmictic species, genetic evidence has revealed a divergent and...

Data from: Larval pheromones act as colony-wide regulators of collective foraging behavior in honeybees

Rong Ma, Gabriel Villar, Christina M. Grozinger & Juliana Rangel
When animals move or forage in groups, collective behaviors arise from independent decisions that individuals make based on limited information about the environment. In decentralized systems in which individuals use local cues to decide how to allocate their time amongst multiple tasks, a “global” signal detectable over large distances by all members of the group could have a profound effect on task allocation and coordination. Honey bees provide a unique opportunity to study how information...

Data from: Enzyme polymorphism, oxygen and injury: a lipidomic analysis of flight-induced oxidative damage in a SDH-polymorphic insect

Julianne E. Pekny, Philip B. Smith & James H. Marden
When active tissues receive insufficient oxygen to meet metabolic demand, succinate accumulates and has two fundamental effects: it causes ischemia-reperfusion injury while also activating the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway (HIF). The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) possesses a balanced polymorphism in Sdhd, shown previously to affect HIF pathway activation and tracheal morphology and used here to experimentally test the hypothesis that variation in succinate dehydrogenase affects oxidative injury. We stimulated butterflies to fly continuously in a...

Data from: Larval density mediates knockdown resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in adult Aedes aegypti

Marissa K. Grossman, Valentin Uc-Puc, Adriana E. Flores, Pablo C. Manrique-Saide & Gonzalo M. Vazquez-Prokopec
Background: Understanding mechanisms driving insecticide resistance in vector populations remains a public health priority. To date, most research has focused on the genetic mechanisms underpinning resistance, yet it is unclear what role environmental drivers may play in shaping phenotypic expression. One of the key environmental drivers of Aedes aegypti mosquito population dynamics is resource-driven intraspecific competition at the larval stage. We experimentally investigated the role of density-dependent larval competition in mediating resistance evolution in Ae....

Data from: Real-time decision-making during emergency disease outbreaks

William J. M. Probert, Chris P. Jewell, Marleen Werkman, Christopher J. Fonnesbeck, Yoshitaka Goto, Michael C. Runge, Satoshi Sekiguchi, Katriona Shea, Matt J. Keeling, Matthew J. Ferrari & Michael J. Tildesley
In the event of a new infectious disease outbreak, mathematical and simulation models are commonly used to inform policy by evaluating which control strategies will minimize the impact of the epidemic. In the early stages of such outbreaks, substantial parameter uncertainty may limit the ability of models to provide accurate predictions, and policymakers do not have the luxury of waiting for data to alleviate this state of uncertainty. For policymakers, however, it is the selection...

Data from: Quantification of gene expression patterns to reveal the origins of abnormal morphogenesis

Neus Martinez-Abadias, Roger Mateu Estivill, Jaume Sastre Tomas, Susan Motch Perrine, Melissa Yoon, Alex Robert-Moreno, Jim Swoger, Lucia Russo, Kazuhiko Kawasaki, Joan Richtsmeier, James Sharpe & Alexandre Robert-Moreno
The earliest developmental origins of dysmorphologies are poorly understood in many congenital diseases. They often remain elusive because the first signs of genetic misregulation may initiate as subtle changes in gene expression, which are hard to detect and can be obscured later in development by secondary effects. Here, we develop a method to trace the origins of phenotypic abnormalities by accurately quantifying the 3D spatial distribution of gene expression domains in developing organs. By applying...

Data from: Opening the door to the past: accessing phylogenetic, pathogen, and population data from museum curated bees

Anthony D. Vaudo, Megan L. Fritz & Margarita M. López-Uribe
Tens of thousands of insects are deposited in collections every year as a result of survey-based studies that aim to investigate ecological questions. DNA-based techniques can expand the utility of these collections to explore their demographic and evolutionary history, temporal changes in their abundance, and pathogen dynamics. Using museum collections of the non-model bee species Eucera (Peponapis) pruinosa Say 1837 (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Eucerini), we developed a standard minimally-destructive and budget-friendly protocol to extract DNA and...

Data from: Weed evolution: genetic differentiation among wild, weedy, and crop radish

Amanda Charbonneau, David Tack, Allison Lale, Josh Goldston, Mackenzie Caple, Emma Conner, Oz Barazani, Jotham Ziffer-Berger, Ian Dworkin & Jeffrey K. Conner
Approximately 200 weed species are responsible for more than 90% of crop losses and these comprise less than one percent of all named plant species, suggesting that there are only a few evolutionary routes that lead to weediness. Agricultural weeds can evolve along three main paths: they can be escaped crops, wild species, or crop-wild hybrids. We tested these three hypotheses in weedy radish, a weed of small grains and an emerging model for investigating...

Data from: Restoration of pyrethroid susceptibility in a highly resistant Aedes aegypti population

Marissa K. Grossman, Valentin Uc-Puc, Julian Rodriguez, David J. Culter, Levi T. Morran, Pablo Manrique-Saide, Gonzalo M. Vazquez-Prokopec & David J. Cutler
Insecticide resistance has evolved in disease vectors worldwide, creating the urgent need to either develop new control methods or restore insecticide susceptibility to regain the use of existing tools. Here we show that phenotypic susceptibility can be restored in a highly resistant field-derived strain of Aedes aegypti in only ten generations through rearing them in the absence of insecticide.

Data from: The significance of prey avoidance behaviour for the maintenance of a predator colour polymorphism

Helena Ajuria Ibarra, Michael Kinahan, Julien Marcetteau, Andrew J.R. Mehigan, Ross O. Ziegelmeier, Tom Reader & Andrew J R Mehigan
The existence of conspicuous colour polymorphisms in animals provides an ideal opportunity to examine the mechanisms which determine genetic and phenotypic variation in populations. It is well known that directional and negative frequency-dependent selection by predators can influence the persistence of colour polymorphisms in their prey, but much less attention has been paid to the idea that prey behaviour could generate selection on predator colour morphs. In this study, we examine the role that avoidance...

Data from: Seeing spots: quantifying mother-offspring similarity and assessing fitness consequences of coat pattern traits in a wild population of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis)

Derek E. Lee, Douglas R. Cavener & Monica L. Bond
Polymorphic phenotypes of mammalian coat coloration have been important to the study of genetics and evolution, but less is known about the inheritance and fitness consequences of individual variation in complex coat pattern traits such as spots and stripes. Giraffe coat markings are highly complex and variable and it has been hypothesized that variation in coat patterns most likely affects fitness by camouflaging neonates against visually hunting predators. We quantified complex coat pattern traits of...

Data from: Diagnostic pathways and direct medical costs incurred by new adult pulmonary tuberculosis patients prior to anti-tuberculosis treatment – Tamil Nadu, India

Karun Sandeep Veesa, Kamalabhai Russell John, Patrick K. Moonan, Saravanakumar Puthupalayam Kaliappan, Krishna Manjunath, Karuna D. Sagili, Chinnappareddy Ravichandra, Pradeep Aravindan Menon, Chandrakumar Dolla, Nancy Luke, Kaivan Munshi, Kuryan George & Shantidani Minz
Background: Tuberculosis (TB) patients face substantial delays prior to treatment initiation, and out of pocket (OOP) expenditures often surpass the economic productivity of the household. We evaluated the pre-diagnostic cost and health seeking behaviour of new adult pulmonary TB patients registered at Primary Health Centres (PHCs) in Vellore district, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods: This descriptive study, part of a randomised controlled trial conducted in three rural Tuberculosis Units from Dec 2012 to Dec 2015, collected...

Data from: The diversity of population responses to environmental change

Fernando Colchero, Owen R. Jones, Dalia A. Conde, Dave Hodgson, Felix Zajitschek, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Aurelio F. Malo, Susan C. Alberts, Peter H. Becker, Sandra Bouwhuis, Anne M. Bronikowski, Kristel M. De Vleeschouwer, Richard J. Delahay, Stefan Dummermuth, Eduardo Fernández-Duque, John Frisenvænge, Martin Hesselsøe, Sam Larson, Jean-Francois Lemaitre, Jennifer McDonald, David A.W. Miller, Colin O'Donnell, Craig Packer, Becky E. Raboy, Christopher J. Reading … & Chris J. Reading
The current extinction and climate change crises pressure us to predict population dynamics with ever-greater accuracy. Although predictions rest on the well-advanced theory of age-structured populations, two key issues remain poorly-explored. Specifically, how the age-dependency in demographic rates and the year-to-year interactions between survival and fecundity affect stochastic population growth rates. We use inference, simulations, and mathematical derivations to explore how environmental perturbations determine population growth rates for populations with different age-specific demographic rates and...

Data from: The influence of symbiotic bacteria on reproductive strategies and wing polyphenism in pea aphids responding to stress

Miguel L. Reyes, Alice M. Laughton, Benjamin James Parker, Hannah Wichmann, Maretta Fan, Daniel Sok, Jan Hrcek, Tarik Acevedo & Nicole M. Gerardo
1. Environmental stressors can be key drivers of phenotypes, including reproductive strategies and morphological traits. The response to stress may be altered by the presence of microbial associates. For example, in aphids, facultative (secondary) bacterial symbionts can provide protection against natural enemies and stress induced by elevated temperatures. Furthermore, aphids exhibit phenotypic plasticity, producing winged (rather than wingless) progeny that may be better able to escape danger, and the combination of these factors improve the...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    43

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    43

Affiliations

  • Pennsylvania State University
    43
  • Emory University
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Cornell University
    3
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • Agricultural Research Service
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • Autonomous University of Yucatán
    2