16 Works

Data from: Food webs obscure the strength of plant diversity effects on primary productivity

Eric W. Seabloom, Linda Kinkel, Elizabeth T. Borer, Yann Hautier, Rebecca A. Montgomery & David Tilman
Plant diversity experiments generally find that increased diversity causes increased productivity; however, primary productivity is typically measured in the presence of a diverse food web, including pathogens, mutualists and herbivores. If food web impacts on productivity vary with plant diversity, as predicted by both theoretical and empirical studies, estimates of the effect of plant diversity on productivity may be biased. We experimentally removed arthropods, foliar fungi and soil fungi from the longest-running plant diversity experiment....

Data from: Periphyton density is similar on native and non-native plant species

Bart M. C. Grutters, Elisabeth Maria Gross, Ellen Van Donk & Elisabeth S. Bakker
Non-native plants increasingly dominate the vegetation in aquatic ecosystems and thrive in eutrophic conditions. In eutrophic conditions, submerged plants risk being overgrown by epiphytic algae; however, if non-native plants are less susceptible to periphyton than natives, this would contribute to their dominance. Non-native plants may differ from natives in their susceptibility to periphyton growth due to differences in nutrient release, allelopathy and architecture. Yet, there is mixed evidence for whether plants interact with periphyton growth...

Data from: Intergenerational environmental effects: functional signals in offspring transcriptomes and metabolomes after parental jasmonic acid treatment in apomictic dandelion

Koen J. F. Verhoeven, Eline H. Verbon, Thomas P. Van Gurp, Carla Oplaat, Julie Ferreira De Carvalho, Alison M. Morse, Mark Stahl, Mirka Macel & Lauren M. McIntyre
Parental environments can influence offspring traits. However, the magnitude of the impact of parental environments on offspring molecular phenotypes is poorly understood. Here, we test the direct effects and intergenerational effects of jasmonic acid (JA) treatment, which is involved in herbivory-induced defense signaling, on transcriptomes and metabolomes in apomictic common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). In a full factorial crossed design with parental and offspring JA and control treatments, we performed leaf RNA-seq gene expression analysis, LC-MS...

Data from: Tracking plant preference for higher-quality mycorrhizal symbionts under varying CO conditions over multiple generations

Gijsbert D. A. Werner, Yeling Zhou, Corné M. J. Pieterse & E. Toby Kiers
The symbiosis between plants and root-colonizing arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is one of the most ecologically important examples of interspecific cooperation in the world. AM fungi provide benefits to plants; in return plants allocate carbon resources to fungi, preferentially allocating more resources to higher-quality fungi. However, preferential allocations from plants to symbionts may vary with environmental context, particularly when resource availability affects the relative value of symbiotic services. We ask how differences in atmospheric CO2-levels...

Data from: An age-dependent fitness cost of migration? Old trans-Saharan migrating spoonbills breed later than those staying in Europe, and late breeders have lower recruitment

Tamar Lok, Linde Veldhoen, Otto Overdijk, Joost M. Tinbergen & Theunis Piersma
1.Migration is a widespread phenomenon in the animal kingdom. On the basis of the considerable variation that exists between and within species, and even within populations, we may be able to infer the (age- and sex-specific) ecological trade-offs and constraints moulding migration systems from assessments of fitness associated with migration and wintering in different areas. 2.During three consecutive breeding seasons, we compared the reproductive performance (timing of breeding, breeding success, chick body condition and post-fledging...

Data from: Sibling species of mutualistic Symbiodinium clade G from bioeroding sponges in the western Pacific and western Atlantic oceans

Blake D. Ramsby, Malcolm S. Hill, Daniel J. Thornhill, Sieuwkje F. Steenuizen, Michelle Achlatis, Allison M. Lewis, Todd C. LaJeunesse & Sieuwkje F. Steenhuizen
Dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium associate with a broad array of metazoan and protistian hosts. Symbiodinium-based symbioses involving bioeroding sponge hosts have received less attention than those involving scleractinian hosts. Certain species of common Cliona harbor high densities of an ecologically restricted group of Symbiodinium, referred to as Clade G. The relationships of these unusual Clade G Symbiodinium with Foraminifera, sponges, and black coral (Antipatharia) are rarely studied. Nonetheless, analyses of genetic evidence indicate that...

Data from: Early spring phytoplankton dynamics in the western Antarctic Peninsula

Kevin R. Arrigo, Gert L. Van Dijken, Anne-Carlijn Alderkamp, Zachary K. Erickson, Kate M. Lewis, Kate E. Lowry, Hannah L. Joy-Warren, Rob Middag, Janice E. Nash-Arrigo, Virginia Selz, Willem H. Van De Poll & Willem Van De Poll
The Palmer Long-Term Ecological Research program has sampled waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula (wAP) annually each summer since 1990. However, information about the wAP prior to the peak of the phytoplankton bloom in January is sparse. Here we present results from a spring process cruise that sampled the wAP in the early stages of phytoplankton bloom development in 2014. Sea ice concentrations were high on the shelf relative to non-shelf waters, especially toward the...

Data from: A morphometric analysis of vegetation patterns in dryland ecosystems

Luke Mander, Stefan C. Dekker, Mao Li, Washington Mio, Surangi W. Punyasena & Timothy M. Lenton
Vegetation in dryland ecosystems often forms remarkable spatial patterns. These range from regular bands of vegetation alternating with bare ground, to vegetated spots and labyrinths, to regular gaps of bare ground within an otherwise continuous expanse of vegetation. It has been suggested that spotted vegetation patterns could indicate that collapse into a bare ground state is imminent, and the morphology of spatial vegetation patterns, therefore, represents a potentially valuable source of information on the proximity...

Data from: Climate and sea-level changes across a shallow marine Cretaceous–Palaeogene boundary succession in Patagonia, Argentina

Johan Vellekoop, Femke Holwerda, Mercedes B. Prámparo, Verónica Willmott, Stefan Schouten, Nestor R. Cúneo, Roberto A. Scasso & Henk Brinkhuis
Upper Maastrichtian to lower Paleocene, coarse-grained deposits of the Lefipán Formation in Chubut Province, (Patagonia, Argentina) provide an opportunity to study environmental changes across the Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–Pg) boundary in a shallow marine depositional environment. Marine palynological and organic geochemical analyses were performed on the K–Pg boundary interval of the Lefipán Formation at the San Ramón section. The palynological and organic geochemical records from the San Ramón K–Pg boundary section are characteristic of a highly dynamic,...

Data from: Seasonal variation in the biocontrol efficiency of bacterial wilt is driven by temperature-mediated changes in bacterial competitive interactions

Zhong Wei, Jianfeng Huang, Tianjie Yang, Alexandre Jousset, Yangchun Xu, Qirong Shen, Ville-Petr Friman & Ville-Petri Friman
1. Microbe-based biocontrol applications hold the potential to become an efficient way to control plant pathogen disease outbreaks in the future. However, their efficiency is still very variable, which could be due to their sensitivity to the abiotic environmental conditions. 2. Here we assessed how environmental temperature variation correlates with the Ralstonia pickettii, an endophytic bacterial biocontrol agent, ability to suppress Ralstonia solanacearum pathogen during different tomato crop seasons in China. 3. We found that...

Data from: Stimulus discriminability may bias value-based probabilistic learning

Iris Schutte, Heleen A. Slagter, Anne G.E. Collins, Michael J. Frank, J. Leon Kenemans & Anne G. E. Collins
Reinforcement learning tasks are often used to assess participants' tendency to learn more from the positive or more from the negative consequences of one's action. However, this assessment often requires comparison in learning performance across different task conditions, which may differ in the relative salience or discriminability of the stimuli associated with more and less rewarding outcomes, respectively. To address this issue, in a first set of studies, participants were subjected to two versions of...

Data from: Nutrient deficiencies and the restriction of compensatory mechanisms in copepods

Alfred Burian, Julia Grosse, Monika Winder & Henricus T. S. Boschker
1.The flexible regulation of feeding behaviour and nutrient metabolism is a prerequisite for consumers to grow and survive under variable food conditions. Thus, it is essential to understand the ecological trade-offs that restrict regulatory mechanisms in consumers to evaluate the consequences of nutrient limitations for trophic interactions. 2.Here, we assessed behavioural and physiological adjustments to nutrient deficiencies in copepods and examined whether energy limitation, food digestibility or co-limitation with a second nutrient restricted compensatory mechanisms....

Data from: Taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled in European peat bogs

Bjorn J. M. Robroek, Vincent E. J. Jassey, Richard J. Payne, Magalí Martí, Luca Bragazza, Albert Bleeker, Alexandre Buttler, Simon J. M. Caporn, Nancy B. Dise, Jens Kattge, Katarzyna Zając, Bo H. Svensson, Jasper Van Ruijven & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
In peatland ecosystems, plant communities mediate a globally significant carbon store. The effects of global environmental change on plant assemblages are expected to be a factor in determining how ecosystem functions such as carbon uptake will respond. Using vegetation data from 56 Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs across Europe, we show that in these ecosystems plant species aggregate into two major clusters that are each defined by shared response to environmental conditions. Across environmental gradients, we find...

Data from: Remote sensing of plant trait responses to field-based plant–soil feedback using UAV-based optical sensors

Bob Van Der Meij, Lammert Kooistra, Juha Suomalainen, Janna M. Barel & Gerlinde B. De Deyn
Plant responses to biotic and abiotic legacies left in soil by preceding plants is known as plant–soil feedback (PSF). PSF is an important mechanism to explain plant community dynamics and plant performance in natural and agricultural systems. However, most PSF studies are short-term and small-scale due to practical constraints for field-scale quantification of PSF effects, yet field experiments are warranted to assess actual PSF effects under less controlled conditions. Here we used unmanned aerial vehicle...

Data from: Growth strategy, phylogeny and stoichiometry determine the allelopathic potential of native and non-native plants

Bart M.C. Grutters, Benedetta Saccomanno, Elisabeth M. Gross, Dedmar B. Van De Waal, Ellen Van Donk, Elizabeth S. Bakker, Bart M. C. Grutters, Dedmer B. Van De Waal & Elisabeth S. Bakker
Secondary compounds can contribute to the success of non-native plant species if they reduce damage by native herbivores or inhibit the growth of native plant competitors. However, there is opposing evidence on whether the secondary compounds of non-native plant species are stronger than those of natives. This may be explained by other factors, besides plant origin, that affect the potential of plant secondary compounds. We tested how plant origin, phylogeny, growth strategy and stoichiometry affected...

Data from: Herbivores safeguard plant diversity by reducing variability in dominance

Brent Mortensen, Brent Danielson, Stan W. Harpole, Juan Alberti, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Lori Biederman, Elizabeth T. Borer, Marc W. Cadotte, John M. Dwyer, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Pablo Luis Peri, Eric W. Seabloom & W. Stanley Harpole
1. Reductions in community evenness can lead to local extinctions as dominant species exclude subordinate species; however, herbivores can prevent competitive exclusion by consuming otherwise dominant plant species, thus increasing evenness. While these predictions logically result from chronic, gradual reductions in evenness, rapid, temporary pulses of dominance may also reduce species richness. Short pulses of dominance can occur as biotic or abiotic conditions temporarily favor one or a few species, manifested as increased temporal variability...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • Utrecht University
    16
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    3
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
    2
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • Stanford University
    1