25 Works

Data from: Shortwave sand transport in the shallow surf zone

J. A. Brinkemper, T. Aagaard, A. T. M. De Bakker, B. G. Ruessink & J. A. Brinkkemper
Empirical parameterizations of the shortwave sand transport that are used in practical engineering models lack the representation of certain processes to accurately predict morphodynamics in shallow water. Therefore, measurements of near‐bed velocity and suspended sand concentration, collected during two field campaigns (at the Sand Engine and Ameland, the Netherlands) and one field‐scale laboratory experiment (BARDEXII), were here analyzed to study the magnitude and direction of the shortwave sand flux in the shallow surf zone. Shortwave...

Data from: Plant functional diversity and nutrient availability can improve restoration of floating fens via facilitation, complementarity and selection effects

Jeroen P. Van Zuidam, Casper H.A. Van Leeuwen, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Jos T.A. Verhoeven, Stephanie IJff, Edwin T.H.M. Peeters, Bastiaan G. Van Zuidam, Merel B. Soons, Edwin T. H. M. Peeters, Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
1. Peat-forming wetlands, and particularly floating fens forming the initial stages of these ecosystems, are globally declining due to excavation, dehydration and eutrophication. Restoration of these valuable ecosystems typically involves re-establishment of early-successional open-water stages with oligotrophic conditions that are characteristic for these systems. However, restoration success is notoriously limited and a potential solution may be to initiate succession by re-introduction of target plant species. Knowledge is needed on (a) which plant functional groups should...

Data from: A mechanistic assessment of the relationship between gut morphology and endozoochorous seed dispersal by waterfowl

Erik Kleyheeg, Bart A. Nolet, Sandra Otero-Ojea & Merel B. Soons
Many plants and invertebrates rely on internal transport by animals for long-distance dispersal. Their dispersal capacity is greatly influenced by interactions with the animal’s digestive tract. Omnivorous birds adjust their digestive tract morphology to seasonally variable diets. We performed feeding trials in waterfowl to unravel how changing organ size, in combination with seed size, affects dispersal potential. We subjected captive mallards to mimics of summer (animal-based), winter (plant-based) and intermediate diets, and analysed gut passage...

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Data from: Genetic homogeneity of North-African goats

Nadjet-Amina Ouchene-Khelifi, Mohamed Lafri, François Pompanon, Abdessamad Ouhrouch, Nassim Ouchene, Véronique Blanquet, Johannes A. Lenstra, Badr Benjelloun & Anne Da Silva
North Africa represents a rich and early reservoir of goat genetic diversity, from which the main African breeds have been derived. In this study, the genetic diversity of four indigenous Algerian goat breeds (i.e., Arabia, Makatia, M’Zabite and Kabyle, with n = 12 for each breed) has been investigated for the first time by genome-wide SNP genotyping; moreover in a broader context, genetic structuration of Algerian and Moroccan goats was explored (via FST, MDS, STRUCTURE,...

Data from: Rare long-distance dispersal of a marine angiosperm across the Pacific Ocean

Timothy M. Smith, Paul H. York, Bernardo R. Broitman, Martin Thiel, Graeme C. Hays, Erik Van Sebille, Nathan F. Putman, Peter I. Macreadie & Craig D. H. Sherman
Aim: Long-distance dispersal (LDD) events occur rarely but play a fundamental role in shaping species biogeography. Lying at the heart of island biogeography theory, LDD relies on unusual events to facilitate colonisation of new habitats and range expansion. Despite the importance of LDD, it is inherently difficult to quantify due to the rarity of such events. We estimate the probability of LDD of the seagrass Heterozostera nigricaulis, a common Australian species, across the Pacific Ocean...

Data from: Differential recycling of coral and algal dissolved organic matter via the sponge loop

Laura Rix, Jasper M. De Goeij, Dick Van Oevelen, Ulrich Struck, Fuad A. Al-Horani, Christian Wild & Malik S. Naumann
Corals and macroalgae release large quantities of dissolved organic matter (DOM), one of the largest sources of organic matter produced on coral reefs. By rapidly taking up DOM and transforming it into particulate detritus, coral reef sponges are proposed to play a key role in transferring the energy and nutrients in DOM to higher trophic levels via the recently discovered sponge loop. DOM released by corals and algae differs in quality and composition, but the...

Data from: Multiple habitat use by declining migratory birds necessitates joined-up conservation

Micha V Jackson, L R Carrasco, Chi-Yeung Choi, Jing Li, Zhijun Ma, David S Melville, Tong Mu, He-Bo Peng, Bradley K Woodworth, Ziyou Yang, Lin Zhang & Richard A Fuller
Many species depend on multiple habitats at different points in space and time. Their effective conservation requires an understanding of how and when each habitat is used, coupled with adequate protection. Migratory shorebirds use intertidal and supratidal wetlands, both of which are affected by coastal landscape change. Yet the extent to which shorebirds use artificial supratidal habitats, particularly at highly developed stopover sites, remains poorly understood leading to potential deficiencies in habitat management. We surveyed...

Data from: Histopathology of diffusion imaging abnormalities in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Susanne J. Van Veluw, Yael D. Reijmer, Andre J. Van Der Kouwe, Andreas Charidimou, Grace A. Riley, Alexander Leemans, Brian J. Bacskai, Matthew P. Frosch, Anand Viswanathan & Steven M. Greenberg
Objective: we sought to determine the underlying mechanism for altered white matter diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures at the histopathologic level in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Methods: formalin-fixed intact hemispheres from nine CAA cases and two elderly controls were scanned at 3 tesla MRI, including a diffusion-weighted sequence. DTI measures (i.e. fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD)) and histopathology measures were obtained from two tracts: the anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) and inferior...

Data from: Field observations of turbulence, sand suspension and cross-shore transport under spilling and plunging breakers

Troels Aagaard, Michael G. Hughes & Gerben Ruessink
Measurements of wave orbital velocity, near-bed turbulence levels and sediment suspension were obtained under plunging and spilling breakers in the outer surf zone on the beach at Vejers, Denmark. For the same range of relative wave heights and indicators of wave nonlinearity, we observed significantly larger suspended sediment concentrations and onshore-directed rates of suspended sediment transport under (long-period) plunging breakers, compared to (short-period) spilling breakers. This is consistent with the long-held understanding that, for a...

Data from: Costs and benefits of non-random seed release for long distance dispersal in wind-dispersed plant species

Jelle Treep, Monique De Jager, Leandra S. Kuiper, Tomer Duman, Gabriel G. Katul & Merel B. Soons
The dispersal ability of plants is a major factor driving ecological responses to global change. In wind-dispersed plant species, non-random seed release in relation to wind speeds has been identified as a major determinant of dispersal distances. However, little information is available about the costs and benefits of non-random abscission and the consequences of timing for dispersal distances. We asked: 1) To what extent is non-random abscission able to promote long-distance dispersal and what is...

Data from: Trait correlation network analysis identifies biomass allocation traits and stem specific length as hub traits in herbaceous perennial plants

Michael Kleyer, Juliane Trinogga, Miguel A. Cebrián-Piqueras, Anastasia Trenkamp, Camilla Fløjgaard, Rasmus Ejrnæs, Tjeerd J. Bouma, Vanessa Minden, Martin Maier, Jasmin Mantilla-Contreras, Dirk C. Albach, Bernd Blasius & Rasmus Ejrnaes
Correlations among plant traits often reflect important trade‐offs or allometric relationships in biological functions like carbon gain, support, water uptake, and reproduction that are associated with different plant organs. Whether trait correlations can be aggregated to “spectra” or “leading dimensions,” whether these dimensions are consistent across plant organs, spatial scale, and growth forms are still open questions. To illustrate the current state of knowledge, we constructed a network of published trait correlations associated with the...

Data from: The importance of competition for light depends on productivity and disturbance

Yann Hautier, Eva Vojtech & Andy Hector
Eutrophication is a major cause of biodiversity loss. In grasslands this appears to occur due to asymmetric competition for light following the increases in aboveground biomass production. Here, we report the results of an experiment with five grass species that tests how well competitive outcomes can be predicted under a factorial combination of fertilized and disturbed (frequent cutting) conditions. Under fertile conditions our results confirm earlier success in predicting short-term competitive outcomes based on light...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Integrating quantitative morphological and qualitative molecular methods to analyze soil nematode community responses to plant range expansion

Stefan Geisen, L. Basten Snoek, Freddy C. Ten Hooven, Henk Duyts, Olga Kostenko, Janneke Bloem, Henk Martens, Casper W. Quist, Johannes A. Helder & Wim H. Van Der Putten
1. Belowground nematodes are important for soil functioning, as they are ubiquitous and operate at various trophic levels in the soil food web. However, morphological nematode community analysis is time consuming and requires ample training. qPCR-based nematode identification techniques are well available, but high throughput sequencing (HTS) might be more suitable for non-targeted nematode community analysis. 2. We compared effectiveness of qPCR and HTS-based approaches with morphological nematode identification while examining how climate warming-induced plant...

Data from: Facilitation promotes invasions in plant-associated microbial communities

Mei Li, Zhong Wei, Jianing Wang, Alexandre Jousset, Ville-Petri Friman, Yangchun Xu, Qirong Shen & Thomas Pommier
While several studies have established a positive correlation between community diversity and invasion resistance, it is less clear how species interactions within resident communities shape this process. Here, we experimentally tested how antagonistic and facilitative pairwise interactions within resident model microbial communities predict invasion by the plant–pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We found that facilitative resident community interactions promoted and antagonistic interactions suppressed invasions both in the lab and in the tomato plant rhizosphere. Crucially, pairwise...

Data from: Carbon resource richness shapes bacterial competitive interactions by alleviating growth-antibiosis trade-off

Chunlan Yang, Yue Dong, Ville-Petri Friman, Alexandre Jousset, Zhong Wei, Yangchun Xu & Qirong Shen
Antibiosis and resource competition are major drivers shaping the assembly, diversity and functioning of microbial communities. While it is recognised that competition is sensitive to environmental conditions, it is unclear to what extent this mediated by the availability of different carbon resources. Here we used a model laboratory system to directly test this by exploring how carbon resource richness and identity shape resource competition and antibiosis between plant probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and phytopathogenic Ralstonia solanacearum...

Data from: Functional responses of aquatic and riparian vegetation to hydrogeomorphic restoration of channelized lowland streams and their valleys

Rob G.A. Fraaije, Claire Poupin, Jos T.A. Verhoeven, Merel B. Soons, Rob G. A. Fraaije & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
1. Streams and riparian zones are highly heterogeneous ecosystems. Their high biodiversity is promoted by variable flow velocities and water depths, strong hydrological gradients and disturbance regimes. However, human interventions like damming and channelization have degraded these ecosystems worldwide. And, although restoration efforts have increased in the past decades, ecological improvement is lagging. 2. We assessed vegetation development in channelized lowland stream valleys in the Netherlands, combining innovative restoration measures to the stream and stream...

Data from: Impact of temperature and nutrients on carbon: nutrient tissue stoichiometry of submerged aquatic plants: an experiment and meta-analysis

Mandy Velthuis, Emma Van Deelen, Ellen Van Donk, Peiyu Zhang & Elisabeth S. Bakker
Human activity is currently changing our environment rapidly, with predicted temperature increases of 1–5°C over the coming century and increased nitrogen and phosphorus inputs in aquatic ecosystems. In the shallow parts of these ecosystems, submerged aquatic plants enhance water clarity by resource competition with phytoplankton, provide habitat, and serve as a food source for other organisms. The carbon:nutrient stoichiometry of submerged aquatic plants can be affected by changes in both temperature and nutrient availability. We...

Data from: Wild and laboratory exposure to cues of predation risk increases relative brain mass in male guppies

Adam R. Reddon, Laura Chouinard-Thuly, Ioannis Leris & Simon M. Reader
There is considerable diversity in brain size within and among species, and substantial dispute over the causes, consequences and importance of this variation. Comparative and developmental studies are essential in addressing this controversy. Predation pressure has been proposed as a major force shaping brain, behaviour and life history. The Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata, shows dramatic variation in predation pressure across populations. We compared the brain mass of guppies from high and low predation populations collected...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Interactions between seed traits and digestive processes determine the germinability of bird-dispersed seeds

Erik Kleyheeg, Mascha Claessens & Merel B. Soons
Waterbirds disperse a wide range of plant seeds via their guts, promoting biotic connectivity between isolated habitat patches. However, the intensity of digestive forces encountered by seeds, and therefore their potential to survive digestive tract passage, varies within and between waterbird species. Here, we investigate under controlled conditions how the interaction between seed traits and digestive strategies affect the germinability of seeds following waterbird-mediated dispersal. We exposed seeds of 30 wetland plant species to the...

Data from: Seed size regulates plant dispersal distances in flowing water

Monique De Jager, Bettina Kaphingst, Erik Janse, Robert Buisman, Sibrand Rinzema, Merel Soons, Monique Jager, Sibrand G. T. Rinzema & Merel B. Soons
Dispersal is an essential component of plant life, especially under the current threats of anthropogenic habitat fragmentation and climate change. For many wetland species, water is a key dispersal vector, as it can presumably disperse seeds long distances and towards suitable sites for establishment. Seed dispersal distance is affected by stream characteristics and seed traits. Yet, the effect of relevant seed traits, such as size, remains largely unknown. Here, we report on an experimental field...

Data from: The impact of hurricanes Irma and Maria on the forest ecosystems of Saba and St. Eustatius, northern Caribbean

Maarten B. Eppinga, Carolyn A. Pucko. & Carolyn A. Pucko
In September 2017, Irma became the first recorded category 5 hurricane to hit the Caribbean Windward Islands. The second category 5, Maria, followed two weeks later. In November 2017, we assessed the structural impact of this disturbance on highly valued Caribbean forest ecosystems. We recorded the status of 935 tree stems on Saba and St. Eustatius in stands at different elevations. Tree damage was substantial on both islands, with 93% of stems being defoliated, 84%...

Data from: An affordable and reliable assessment of aquatic decomposition: tailoring the Tea Bag Index to surface waters

Laura M.S. Seelen, Giovanna Flaim, Joost Keuskamp, Sven Teurlincx, Raquel Arias Font, Duygu Tolunay, Markéta Fránková, Kateřina Šumberová, Maria Temponeras, Mirjana Lenhardt, Eleanor Jennings & Lisette N. De Senerpont Domis
Litter decomposition is a vital part of the global carbon cycle as it determines not only the amount of carbon to be sequestered, but also how fast carbon re-enters the cycle. Freshwater systems play an active role in the carbon cycle as it receives, and decomposes, terrestrial litter material alongside decomposing aquatic plant litter. Decomposition of organic matter in the aquatic environment is directly controlled by water temperature and nutrient availability, which are continuously affected...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25

Affiliations

  • Utrecht University
    25
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    6
  • Duke University
    3
  • University of Guelph
    3
  • Monash University
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Pretoria
    2
  • Utah State University
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2