65 Works

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in plant-soil feedbacks alters competitive interactions between two grassland plant species

Wei Xue, Frank Berendse & T. Martijn Bezemer
1. The effects of plants on soil vary greatly between plant species and in mixed plant communities this can lead to spatial variation in plant-soil feedback (PSF) effects. Such spatial effects are thought to influence plant species coexistence, but the empirical evidence for this hypothesis is limited. 2. Here, we investigate how spatial heterogeneity in PSFs influences plant growth and competition. The experiment was carried out with high and low nutrient soils to examine how...

Data from: Plant functional diversity and nutrient availability can improve restoration of floating fens via facilitation, complementarity and selection effects

Jeroen P. Van Zuidam, Casper H.A. Van Leeuwen, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Jos T.A. Verhoeven, Stephanie IJff, Edwin T.H.M. Peeters, Bastiaan G. Van Zuidam, Merel B. Soons, Edwin T. H. M. Peeters, Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
1. Peat-forming wetlands, and particularly floating fens forming the initial stages of these ecosystems, are globally declining due to excavation, dehydration and eutrophication. Restoration of these valuable ecosystems typically involves re-establishment of early-successional open-water stages with oligotrophic conditions that are characteristic for these systems. However, restoration success is notoriously limited and a potential solution may be to initiate succession by re-introduction of target plant species. Knowledge is needed on (a) which plant functional groups should...

Data from: Cattle affect regeneration of the palm species Attalea princeps in a Bolivian forest-savanna mosaic

Iris Hordijk, Fabian Meijer, Esther Nissen, Tjalle Boorsma, Lourens Poorter. & Lourens Poorter
Attalea princeps is an important palm species that shapes the forest-savanna mosaic in Beni, Bolivia, because it dominates and shapes the two principal forest landscape elements (forest islands and gallery forest), and it provides a vital microhabitat, food and nesting source for numerous plant and animal species. The forest-savanna mosaic is used for extensive grazing, and the palm population is declining on the forest islands due to a low regeneration rate, which threatens the maintenance...

Data from: Soil microbes promote complementarity effects among co-existing trees through soil nitrogen partitioning

Shan Luo, Bernhard Schmid, Gerlinde B. De Deyn & Shixiao Yu
1. Plant resource partitioning is a mechanism promoting species coexistence and ecosystem functioning. Yet, we still have limited understanding of how soil microbes, especially plant symbiotic microbes, influence resource partitioning. We hypothesized that soil borne microbes, in particular mycorrhizal fungi, facilitate differential performance of tree species depending on different nitrogen sources and that this leads to a positive plant diversity–community productivity relationship. 2. We conducted two complementing glasshouse experiments. In a “monoculture experiment”, we supplied...

Data from: Responses of insect herbivores and their food plants to wind exposure and the importance of predation risk

Cong Chen, Arjen Biere, Rieta Gols, Wouter Halfwerk, Kees Van Oers & Jeffrey A. Harvey
1. Wind is an important abiotic factor that influences an array of biological processes, but it is rarely considered in studies on plant-herbivore interactions. 2. Here, we tested whether wind exposure could directly or indirectly affect the performance of two insect herbivores, Plutella xylostella and Pieris brassicae, feeding on Brassica nigra plants. 3. In a greenhouse study using a factorial design, B. nigra plants were exposed to different wind regimes generated by fans before and...

Data from: Ranked tree shapes, nonrandom extinctions and the loss of phylogenetic diversity

Odile Maliet, Fanny Gascuel & Amaury Lambert
Phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a measure of the evolutionary legacy of a group of species, which can be used to define conservation priorities. It has been shown that an important loss of species diversity can sometimes lead to a much less important loss of PD, depending on the topology of the species tree and on the distribution of its branch lengths. However, the rate of decrease of PD strongly depends on the relative depths of...

Data from: Symbiotic polydnavirus and venom reveal parasitoid to its hyperparasitoids

Feng Zhu, Antonino Cusumano, Janneke Bloem, Berhane T. Weldegergis, Alexandre Villela, Nina E. Fatouros, Joop J.A. Van Loon, Marcel Dicke, Jeffrey A. Harvey, Heiko Vogel & Erik H. Poelman
Symbiotic relationships may provide organisms with key innovations that aid in the establishment of new niches. For example, during oviposition, some species of parasitoid wasps, whose larvae develop inside the bodies of other insects, inject polydnaviruses into their hosts. These symbiotic viruses disrupt host immune responses, allowing the parasitoid’s progeny to survive. Here, we show that symbiotic polydnaviruses also have a downside to the parasitoid’s progeny by initiating a multi-trophic chain of interactions that reveals...

Data from: Body stores persist as fitness correlate in a long-distance migrant released from food constraints

Adriaan M. Dokter, Wimke Fokkema, Steven K. Bekker, Willem Bouten, Barwoldt S. Ebbinge, Gerard Müskens, Han Olff, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Bart A. Nolet & Barwolt S Ebbinge
Long-distance migratory birds rely on acquisition of body reserves to fuel their migration and reproduction. Breeding success depends on the amount of body reserve acquired prior to migration, which is thought to increase with access to food at the fuelling site. Here we studied how food abundance during fuelling affected time budgets and reproductive success. In a regime of plenty, we expected that (1) limitations on food harvesting would become lifted, allowing birds to frequently...

Data from: From salmon to salmonberry: the effects of salmon-derived nutrients on the stomatal density of leaves of the nitriphillic shrub Rubus spectabilis

G.G. Van Den Top, John D. Reynolds, Herbert H.T. Prins, Jim Mattsson, David J. Green, Ronald C. Ydenberg, Gregory G. Van Den Top & Herbert H. T. Prins
Background and Aims: Nutrients derived from the carcasses of Pacific salmon have been shown to have wide-ranging effects on riparian systems. These include changes in community species composition and an increase in leaf nitrogen concentration, with the latter effect pronounced in the nitriphilic shrub Rubus spectabilis (salmonberry). Experimental work with other species has shown that leaf stomatal density increases in response to nitrogen fertilization. Therefore, we predicted that the stomatal density of salmonberry leaves would...

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: Modelling mobile agent-based ecosystem services using kernel weighted predictors

Paul W. Goedhart, Marjolein E. Lof, Felix J.J.A. Bianchi, Hans J. M. Baveco, Wopke Van Der Werf & Felix J. J. A. Bianchi
1. Agriculture benefits from ecosystem services provided by mobile agents, such as biological pest control by natural enemies and pollination by bees. However, methods that can generate spatially explicit predictions and maps of these ecosystem services based on empirical data are still scarce. 2. Here we propose a generic statistical model to derive kernel functions to characterize the spatial distribution of ecosystem services provided by mobile agents. The model is similar in spirit to a...

Data from: Mapping the imprint of biotic interactions on β-diversity

Marc Ohlmann, Florent Mazel, Loïc Chalmandrier, Stéphane Bec, Eric Coissac, Ludovic Gielly, Johan Pansu, Vincent Schilling, Pierre Taberlet, Lucie Zinger, Jerome Chave & Wilfried Thuiller
Investigating how trophic interactions influence the β-diversity of meta-communities is of paramount importance to understanding the processes shaping biodiversity distribution. Here, we apply a statistical method for inferring the strength of spatial dependencies between pairs of species groups. Using simulated community data generated from a multi-trophic model, we showed that this method can approximate biotic interactions in multi-trophic communities based on β-diversity patterns across groups. When applied to soil multi-trophic communities along an elevational gradient...

Data from: Selection for associative learning of color stimuli reveals correlated evolution of this learning ability across multiple stimuli and rewards.

Maartje Liefting, Katja M. Hoedjes, Cécile Le Lann, Hans M. Smid & Jacintha Ellers
We are only starting to understand how variation in cognitive ability can result from local adaptations to environmental conditions. A major question in this regard is to what extent selection on cognitive ability in a specific context affects that ability in general through correlated evolution. To address this question we performed artificial selection on visual associative learning in female Nasonia vitripennis wasps. Using appetitive conditioning in which a visual stimulus was offered in association with...

Data from: Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in a long-term non-weeded field experiment

Ciska G.F. Veen, Wim Van Der Putten, T. Martijn Bezemer, Wim H. Van Der Putten & G. F. Veen
Many grassland biodiversity experiments show a positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, however, in most these experiments plant communities are established by sowing and natural colonization is prevented by selective weeding of non-sown species. During ecosystem restoration, for example on abandoned fields, plant communities start on bare soil, and diversity is often manipulated in a single sowing event. How such initial plant diversity manipulations influence plant biodiversity development and ecosystem functioning is not well...

Data from: The effects of recent changes in breeding preferences on maintaining traditional Dutch chicken genomic diversity

Chiara Bortoluzzi, Richard P.M.A. Crooijmans, Mirte Bosse, Sipke Joost Hiemstra, Martien A.M. Groenen & Hendrik-Jan Megens
Traditional Dutch chicken breeds are marginalised breeds of ornamental and cultural-historical importance. In the last decades, miniaturising of existing breeds (so called neo-bantam) has become popular and resulted in alternatives to original large breeds. However, while backcrossing is increasing the neo-bantams homozygosity, genetic exchange between breeders may increase their genetic diversity. We use the 60K SNP array to characterise the genetic diversity, demographic history, and level of inbreeding of Dutch heritage breeds, and particularly of...

Data from: Relationships between leaf mass per area and nutrient concentrations in 98 Mediterranean woody species are determined by phylogeny, habitat and leaf habit

Enrique G. De La Riva, Rafael Villar, Ignacio M. Pérez-Ramos, José Luis Quero, Luis Matías, Lourens Poorter & Teodoro Marañón
Leaf structural and nutrient traits are key attributes of plant ecological strategies, as these traits are related to resource-use strategies and plant growth. However, leaf structure and nutrient composition can vary among different habitats, leaf habits or phylogenetic groups. In this study, we measured 13 leaf traits (one structural—leaf mass per area, LMA—and 12 nutrient traits) in 98 Mediterranean woody species growing over a wide range of environmental conditions, with the final aim of discerning...

Data from: Estimating sensitivity of seabed habitats to disturbance by bottom trawling based on the longevity of benthic fauna

Adriaan D. Rijnsdorp, Stefan G. Bolam, Clement Garcia, Jan Geert Hiddink, Niels T. Hintzen, P. Daniel Van Denderen & Tobias Van Kooten
Bottom fishing such as trawling and dredging may pose serious risks to the seabed and benthic habitats, calling for a quantitative assessment method to evaluate the impact and guide management to develop mitigation measures. We provide a method to estimate the sensitivity of benthic habitats based on the longevity composition of the invertebrate community. We hypothesize that long-lived species are more sensitive to trawling mortality due to their lower pace of life (i.e. slower growth,...

Data from: Rapid divergence of mussel populations despite incomplete barriers to dispersal

Diede L. Maas, Stefan Prost, Ke Bi, Lydia L. Smith, Ellie E. Armstrong, Ludi P. Aji, Abdul H.A. Toha, Rosemary G. Gillespie & Leontine E. Becking
Striking genetic structure among marine populations at small spatial scales is becoming evident with extensive molecular studies. Such observations suggest isolation at small scales may play an important role in forming patterns of genetic diversity within species. Isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-environment, and historical priority effects are umbrella terms for a suite of processes that underlie genetic structure, but their relative importance at different spatial and temporal scales remains elusive. Here, we use marine lakes in Indonesia to...

Data from: Reduction of baseline corticosterone secretion correlates with climate warming and drying across wild lizard populations

Andréaz Dupoué, Alexis Rutschmann, Jean F. Le Galliard, Jean Clobert, Pauline Blaimont, Barry Sinervo, Donald B. Miles, Claudy Haussy & Sandrine Meylan
1. Climate change should lead to massive loss of biodiversity in most taxa but the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying population extinction remain largely elusive so far. In vertebrates, baseline levels of hormones such as glucocorticoids (GCs) may be indicators of population state since their secretion to chronic stress can impair survival and reproduction. However, the relationship between GC secretion, climate change and population extinction risk remains unclear. 2. In this study we investigated whether levels...

Data from: Nematode community responses to range-expanding and native plant communities in original and new range soils

Rutger A. Wilschut, Olga Kostenko, Kadri Koorem & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Many plant species expand their range to higher latitudes in response to climate change. However, it is poorly understood how biotic interactions in the new range differ from interactions in the original range. Here, in a mesocosm experiment, we analyze nematode community responses in original and new range soils to plant communities with either 1) species native in both the original and new range, 2) range-expanding species related to these natives (related range-expanders), or 3)...

Data from: Maternal size and body condition predict the amount of post-fertilization maternal provisioning in matrotrophic fish

Andres Hagmayer, Andrew I. Furness, David N. Reznick & Bart J. A. Pollux
Maternal effects often provide a mechanism for adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. The maternal phenotype can profoundly influence the potential for such environmentally-induced adjustments of the offspring phenotype, causing correlations between offspring and maternal traits. Here we study potential effects of the maternal phenotype on offspring provisioning prior to and during gestation in the matrotrophic live-bearing fish species Poeciliopsis retropinna. Specifically, we examine how maternal traits such as body fat, lean mass and length relate to...

Data from: A high density SNP chip for genotyping great tit (Parus major) populations and its application to studying the genetic architecture of exploration behaviour

Jun-Mo Kim, Anna W. Santure, Henry J. Barton, John L. Quinn, Eleanor F. Cole, Marcel E. Visser, Ben C. Sheldon, Martien A.M. Groenen, Kees Van Oers, Jon Slate & J.-M. Kim
High density SNP microarrays (‘SNP chips’) are a rapid, accurate and efficient method for genotyping several hundred thousand polymorphisms in large numbers of individuals. While SNP chips are routinely used in human genetics and in animal and plant breeding, they are less widely used in evolutionary and ecological research. In this paper we describe the development and application of a high density Affymetrix Axiom chip with around 500 000 SNPs, designed to perform genomics studies...

Data from: Integrating quantitative morphological and qualitative molecular methods to analyze soil nematode community responses to plant range expansion

Stefan Geisen, L. Basten Snoek, Freddy C. Ten Hooven, Henk Duyts, Olga Kostenko, Janneke Bloem, Henk Martens, Casper W. Quist, Johannes A. Helder & Wim H. Van Der Putten
1. Belowground nematodes are important for soil functioning, as they are ubiquitous and operate at various trophic levels in the soil food web. However, morphological nematode community analysis is time consuming and requires ample training. qPCR-based nematode identification techniques are well available, but high throughput sequencing (HTS) might be more suitable for non-targeted nematode community analysis. 2. We compared effectiveness of qPCR and HTS-based approaches with morphological nematode identification while examining how climate warming-induced plant...

Data from: Multiple infections, relatedness and virulence in the anther-smut fungus castrating Saponaria plants

Taiadjana M. Fortuna, Alice Namias, Alodie Snirc, Antoine Branca, Michael E. Hood, Christian Raquin, Jacqui A. Shykoff & Tatiana Giraud
Multiple infections (co-occurrence of multiple pathogen genotypes within an individual host) can have important impacts on diseases. Relatedness among pathogens can affect the likelihood of multiple infections and their consequences through kin selection. Previous studies on the castrating anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae have shown that multiple infections occur in its host plant Silene latifolia. Relatedness was high among fungal genotypes within plants, which could result from competitive exclusion between unrelated fungal genotypes, from population structure...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    65

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    65

Affiliations

  • Wageningen University & Research
    65
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    15
  • VU University Amsterdam
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of Freiburg
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • University of Padua
    2
  • Bangor University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2