65 Works

Data from: Winter cover crop legacy effects on litter decomposition act through litter quality and microbial community changes

Janna M. Barel, Thomas W. Kuyper, Jos Paul, Wietse De Boer, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen & Gerlinde B. De Deyn
1. In agriculture, winter cover crop (WCC) residues are incorporated into the soil to improve soil quality, as gradual litter decomposition can improve fertility. Decomposition rate is determined by litter quality, local soil abiotic and biotic properties. However, how these factors are interlinked and influenced by cropping history is unclear. 2. We grew WCC monocultures and mixtures in rotation with main crops Avena sativa and Cichorium endivia and tested how crop rotation influences WCC litter...

Data from: Does wolf presence reduce moose browsing intensity in young forest plantations?

Suzanne T.S. Van Beeck Calkoen, Dries P.J. Kuijper, Hakan Sand, Navinder J. Singh, Sip E. Van Wieren, Joris P.G.M. Cromsigt, Joris P. G. M. Cromsigt, Suzanne T. S. Van Beeck Calkoen & Dries P. J. Kuijper
Large carnivores can be a key factor in shaping their ungulate prey’s behavior, which may affect lower trophic levels. While most studies on trade-offs between food acquisition and risk avoidance by ungulate prey species have been conducted in areas with limited human impact, carnivores are now increasingly returning to highly anthropogenic landscapes. Many of these landscapes are dominated by forestry, and ungulate-forestry conflicts are an increasing issue. The aim of this study was to test...

Data from: Carrying a logger reduces escape flight speed in a passerine bird, but relative logger mass may be a misleading measure of this flight performance detriment

Barbara M. Tomotani, Wender Bil, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Remco P.M. Pieters, Florian T. Muijres & Remco P. M. Pieters
1. The recent boost in bird migration studies following the development of various tracking devices raised awareness of how detrimental attaching devices can be for animals. Such effects can occur during migration, but also immediately post-release if the device impairs escape flight performance and, consequently, the bird’s ability to evade predators. 2. In this study, we investigated the effect of carrying a device on the escape flight speed and aerodynamic force production in a migratory...

Data from: Disturbance intensity is a stronger driver of biomass recovery than remaining tree-community attributes in a managed Amazonian forest

Angela L. De Avila, Masha T. Van Der Sande, Carsten F. Dormann, Marielos Peña-Claros, Lourens Poorter, Lucas Mazzei, Ademir R. Ruschel, José N. M. Silva, João O. P. De Carvalho & Jürgen Bauhus
1.Forest recovery following management interventions is important to maintain ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services. It remains, however, largely unclear how aboveground biomass (AGB) recovery of species-rich tropical forests is affected by disturbance intensity and post-disturbance (remaining) tree-community attributes, following logging and thinning interventions. 2.We investigated whether annual AGB increment (∆AGB) decreases with management-related disturbance intensity (disturbance hypothesis), and increases with the diversity (niche-complementarity hypothesis) and the community-weighted mean (CWM) of acquisitive traits...

Data from: Insect pollination is at least as important for marketable crop yield as plant quality in a seed crop

Thijs P. M. Fijen, Jeroen A. Scheper, Timo M. Boom, Nicole Janssen, Ivo Raemakers & David Kleijn
The sustainability of agriculture can be improved by integrating management of ecosystem services, such as insect pollination, into farming practices. However, large‐scale adoption of ecosystem services‐based practices in agriculture is lacking, possibly because growers undervalue the benefits of ecosystem services compared to those of conventional management practices. Here we show that, under representative real‐world conditions, pollination and plant quality made similar contributions to marketable seed yield of hybrid leek (Allium porrum). Relative to the median,...

Data from: Order of herbivore arrival on wild cabbage populations influences subsequent arthropod community development

Jeltje M. Stam, Marcel Dicke & Erik H. Poelman
In plant-arthropod associations, the first herbivores to colonise a plant may directly or indirectly affect community assembly on that particular plant. Whether the order of arrival of different arthropod species further modulates community assembly and affects plant fitness remains unclear. Using wild Brassica oleracea plants in the field, we manipulated the order of arrival of early-season herbivores that belong to different feeding guilds, namely the aphid Brevicoryne brassicae and caterpillars of Plutella xylostella. We investigated...

Data from: Unraveling the causes of adaptive benefits of synonymous mutations in TEM-1 β-lactamase

Mark P. Zwart, Martijn F. Schenk, Sungmin Hwang, Bertha Koopmanschap, Niek De Lange, Lion Van De Pol, Tran T.T. Nga, Ivan G. Szendro, Joachim Krug & J. Arjan G.M. De Visser
While synonymous mutations were long thought to be without phenotypic consequences, there is growing evidence they can affect gene expression, protein folding and ultimately the fitness of an organism. In only a few cases have the mechanisms by which synonymous mutations affect the phenotype been elucidated. We previously identified 48 mutations in TEM-1 β-lactamase that increased resistance of Escherichia coli to cefotaxime, 10 of which were synonymous. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the...

Data from: Scaling up effects of measures mitigating pollinator loss from local- to landscape-level population responses

David Kleijn, Theo E. W. Linders, Anthonie Stip, Jacobus C. Biesmeijer, Felix L. Wäckers & Tibor Bukovinszky
1. Declining pollinator populations have caused concern about consequences for food production, and have initiated an increasing number of initiatives that aim to mitigate pollinator loss through enhancement of floral resources. Studies evaluating effects of mitigation measures generally demonstrate positive responses of pollinators to floral resource enhancement. However, it remains unclear whether this represents landscape-level population effects or results from a spatial redistribution of individuals from otherwise unaffected populations. 2. Here we present a method...

Data from: Biodiversity in species, traits and structure determines carbon stocks and uptake in tropical forests

Masha T. Van Der Sande, Lourens Poorter, Lammert Kooistra, Patricia Balvanera, Kirsten Thonicke, Jill Thompson, Eric J. M. M. Arets, Nashieli Garcia Alaniz, Laurence Jones, Francisco Mora, Tuyeni H. Mwampamba, Terry Parr & Marielos Peña-Claros
Impacts of climate change require that society urgently develops ways to reduce amounts of carbon in the atmosphere. Tropical forests present an important opportunity, as they take up and store large amounts of carbon. It is often suggested that forests with high biodiversity have large stocks and high rates of carbon uptake. Evidence is, however, scattered across geographic areas and scales, and it remains unclear whether biodiversity is just a co‐benefit or also a requirement...

Data from: Slower environmental change hinders adaptation from standing genetic variation

Thiago S. Guzella, Snigdhadip Dey, Ivo M. Chelo, Ania Pino-Querido, Veronica F. Pereira, Stephen R. Proulx & Henrique Teotónio
Evolutionary responses to environmental change depend on the time available for adaptation before environmental degradation leads to extinction. Explicit tests of this relationship are limited to microbes where adaptation usually depends on the sequential fixation of de novo mutations, excluding standing variation for genotype-by-environment fitness interactions that should be key for most natural species. For most natural species evolving from standing genetic variation, adaptation at slower rates of environmental change may be impeded since the...

Data from: Response to short-term deprivation of the human adult visual cortex measured with 7T BOLD

Paola Binda, Jan W. Kurzawski, Claudia Lunghi, Laura Biagi, Michela Tosetti & Maria Concetta Morrone
Sensory deprivation during the post-natal "critical period" leads to structural reorganization of the developing visual cortex. In adulthood, the visual cortex retains some flexibility and adapts to sensory deprivation. Here we show that short-term (2h) monocular deprivation in adult humans boosts the BOLD response to the deprived eye, changing ocular dominance of V1 vertices, consistent with homeostatic plasticity. The boost is strongest in V1, present in V2, V3 &V4 but absent in V3a and hMT+....

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in plant-soil feedbacks alters competitive interactions between two grassland plant species

Wei Xue, Frank Berendse & T. Martijn Bezemer
1. The effects of plants on soil vary greatly between plant species and in mixed plant communities this can lead to spatial variation in plant-soil feedback (PSF) effects. Such spatial effects are thought to influence plant species coexistence, but the empirical evidence for this hypothesis is limited. 2. Here, we investigate how spatial heterogeneity in PSFs influences plant growth and competition. The experiment was carried out with high and low nutrient soils to examine how...

Data from: Soil microbes promote complementarity effects among co-existing trees through soil nitrogen partitioning

Shan Luo, Bernhard Schmid, Gerlinde B. De Deyn & Shixiao Yu
1. Plant resource partitioning is a mechanism promoting species coexistence and ecosystem functioning. Yet, we still have limited understanding of how soil microbes, especially plant symbiotic microbes, influence resource partitioning. We hypothesized that soil borne microbes, in particular mycorrhizal fungi, facilitate differential performance of tree species depending on different nitrogen sources and that this leads to a positive plant diversity–community productivity relationship. 2. We conducted two complementing glasshouse experiments. In a “monoculture experiment”, we supplied...

Data from: Responses of insect herbivores and their food plants to wind exposure and the importance of predation risk

Cong Chen, Arjen Biere, Rieta Gols, Wouter Halfwerk, Kees Van Oers & Jeffrey A. Harvey
1. Wind is an important abiotic factor that influences an array of biological processes, but it is rarely considered in studies on plant-herbivore interactions. 2. Here, we tested whether wind exposure could directly or indirectly affect the performance of two insect herbivores, Plutella xylostella and Pieris brassicae, feeding on Brassica nigra plants. 3. In a greenhouse study using a factorial design, B. nigra plants were exposed to different wind regimes generated by fans before and...

Data from: From salmon to salmonberry: the effects of salmon-derived nutrients on the stomatal density of leaves of the nitriphillic shrub Rubus spectabilis

G.G. Van Den Top, John D. Reynolds, Herbert H.T. Prins, Jim Mattsson, David J. Green, Ronald C. Ydenberg, Gregory G. Van Den Top & Herbert H. T. Prins
Background and Aims: Nutrients derived from the carcasses of Pacific salmon have been shown to have wide-ranging effects on riparian systems. These include changes in community species composition and an increase in leaf nitrogen concentration, with the latter effect pronounced in the nitriphilic shrub Rubus spectabilis (salmonberry). Experimental work with other species has shown that leaf stomatal density increases in response to nitrogen fertilization. Therefore, we predicted that the stomatal density of salmonberry leaves would...

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: Cattle affect regeneration of the palm species Attalea princeps in a Bolivian forest-savanna mosaic

Iris Hordijk, Fabian Meijer, Esther Nissen, Tjalle Boorsma, Lourens Poorter. & Lourens Poorter
Attalea princeps is an important palm species that shapes the forest-savanna mosaic in Beni, Bolivia, because it dominates and shapes the two principal forest landscape elements (forest islands and gallery forest), and it provides a vital microhabitat, food and nesting source for numerous plant and animal species. The forest-savanna mosaic is used for extensive grazing, and the palm population is declining on the forest islands due to a low regeneration rate, which threatens the maintenance...

Data from: Symbiotic polydnavirus and venom reveal parasitoid to its hyperparasitoids

Feng Zhu, Antonino Cusumano, Janneke Bloem, Berhane T. Weldegergis, Alexandre Villela, Nina E. Fatouros, Joop J.A. Van Loon, Marcel Dicke, Jeffrey A. Harvey, Heiko Vogel & Erik H. Poelman
Symbiotic relationships may provide organisms with key innovations that aid in the establishment of new niches. For example, during oviposition, some species of parasitoid wasps, whose larvae develop inside the bodies of other insects, inject polydnaviruses into their hosts. These symbiotic viruses disrupt host immune responses, allowing the parasitoid’s progeny to survive. Here, we show that symbiotic polydnaviruses also have a downside to the parasitoid’s progeny by initiating a multi-trophic chain of interactions that reveals...

Data from: Ranked tree shapes, nonrandom extinctions and the loss of phylogenetic diversity

Odile Maliet, Fanny Gascuel & Amaury Lambert
Phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a measure of the evolutionary legacy of a group of species, which can be used to define conservation priorities. It has been shown that an important loss of species diversity can sometimes lead to a much less important loss of PD, depending on the topology of the species tree and on the distribution of its branch lengths. However, the rate of decrease of PD strongly depends on the relative depths of...

Data from: Body stores persist as fitness correlate in a long-distance migrant released from food constraints

Adriaan M. Dokter, Wimke Fokkema, Steven K. Bekker, Willem Bouten, Barwoldt S. Ebbinge, Gerard Müskens, Han Olff, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Bart A. Nolet & Barwolt S Ebbinge
Long-distance migratory birds rely on acquisition of body reserves to fuel their migration and reproduction. Breeding success depends on the amount of body reserve acquired prior to migration, which is thought to increase with access to food at the fuelling site. Here we studied how food abundance during fuelling affected time budgets and reproductive success. In a regime of plenty, we expected that (1) limitations on food harvesting would become lifted, allowing birds to frequently...

Data from: Plant functional diversity and nutrient availability can improve restoration of floating fens via facilitation, complementarity and selection effects

Jeroen P. Van Zuidam, Casper H.A. Van Leeuwen, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Jos T.A. Verhoeven, Stephanie IJff, Edwin T.H.M. Peeters, Bastiaan G. Van Zuidam, Merel B. Soons, Edwin T. H. M. Peeters, Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
1. Peat-forming wetlands, and particularly floating fens forming the initial stages of these ecosystems, are globally declining due to excavation, dehydration and eutrophication. Restoration of these valuable ecosystems typically involves re-establishment of early-successional open-water stages with oligotrophic conditions that are characteristic for these systems. However, restoration success is notoriously limited and a potential solution may be to initiate succession by re-introduction of target plant species. Knowledge is needed on (a) which plant functional groups should...

Data from: Increased transgenerational epigenetic variation, but not predictable epigenetic variants, after environmental exposure in two apomictic dandelion lineages

Veronica Preite, Carla Oplaat, Arjen Biere, Jan Kirschner, Wim H. Van Der Putten & Koen J. F. Verhoeven
DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms underlying epigenetic modifications. DNA methylations can be environmentally induced and such induced modifications can at times be transmitted to successive generations. However, it remains speculative how common such environmentally induced transgenerational DNA methylation changes are and if they persist for more than one offspring generation. We exposed multiple accessions of two different apomictic dandelion lineages of the Taraxacum officinale group (Taraxacum alatum and T. hemicyclum) to drought and...

Data from: Variation in home-field advantage and ability in leaf litter decomposition across successional gradients

G.F. Ciska Veen, Ashley D. Keiser, Wim H. Van Der Putten, David A. Wardle & G. F. Ciska Veen
1. It is increasingly recognized that interactions between plants and soil (a)biotic conditions can influence local decomposition processes. For example, decomposer communities may become specialized in breaking down litter of plant species that they are associated with, resulting in accelerated decomposition, known as ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA). Also, soils can vary inherently in their capacity to degrade organic compounds, known as ‘ability’. However, we have a poor understanding how environmental conditions drive the occurrence of HFA...

Data from: Modelling the co-evolution of indirect genetic effects and inherited variability

Jovana Marjanovic, Han A. Mulder, Lars Rönnegård & Piter Bijma
When individuals interact, their phenotypes may be affected by genes in their social partners, a phenomenon known as Indirect Genetic Effects (IGEs). In aquaculture species and some plants, competition not only affects trait levels of individuals, but also inflates variation of trait values among individuals. Variability of trait values has been studied as a quantitative trait in itself, and is often referred to as inherited variability. Although the observed phenotypic relationship between competition and variability...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    65

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    65

Affiliations

  • Wageningen University & Research
    65
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    15
  • VU University Amsterdam
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of Freiburg
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • University of Padua
    2
  • Bangor University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2