23 Works

Data from: Phenology differences between native and novel exotic-dominated grasslands rival the effects of climate change

Brian J. Wilsey, Leanne M. Martin & Andrew D. Kaul
1. Novel ecosystems can differ from the native systems they replaced. We used phenology measures to compare ecosystem functioning between novel exotic-dominated and native-dominated grasslands in the central US. 2. Phenology, or timing of biological events, is affected by climate and land use changes. We assessed how phenology shifts are being altered by exotic species dominance by comparing remotely sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) within growing seasons at exotic- and native-dominated sites along a...

Data from: Monarch butterfly population decline in North America: identifying the threatening processes

Wayne E. Thogmartin, Ruscena Wiederholt, Karen Oberhauser, Ryan G. Drum, Jay E. Diffendorfer, Sonia Altizer, Orley R. Taylor, John Pleasants, Darius Semmens, Brice Semmens, Richard Erickson, Kaitlin Libby & Laura Lopez-Hoffman
The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) population in North America has sharply declined over the last two decades. Despite rising concern over the monarch butterfly's status, no comprehensive study of the factors driving this decline has been conducted. Using partial least-squares regressions and time-series analysis, we investigated climatic and habitat-related factors influencing monarch population size from 1993 to 2014. Potential threats included climatic factors, habitat loss (milkweed and overwinter forest), disease and agricultural insecticide use (neonicotinoids)....

Data from: Increased power to dissect adaptive traits in global sorghum diversity using a nested association mapping population

Sophie Bouchet, Marcus O. Olatoye, Sandeep R. Marla, Ramasamy Perumal, Tesfaye Tesso, Jianming Yu, Mitch Tuinstra & Geoffrey P. Morris
Adaptation of domesticated species to diverse agroclimatic regions has led to abundant trait diversity. However, the resulting population structure and genetic heterogeneity confounds association mapping of adaptive traits. To address this challenge in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]—a widely adapted cereal crop—we developed a nested association mapping (NAM) population using 10 diverse global lines crossed with an elite reference line RTx430. We characterized the population of 2214 recombinant inbred lines at 90,000 SNPs using genotyping-by-sequencing....

Data from: Do ecological communities disperse across biogeographic barriers as a unit?

Jordan D. Satler & Bryan C. Carstens
Biogeographic barriers have long been implicated as drivers of biological diversification, but how these barriers influence co-occurring taxa can vary depending on factors intrinsic to the organism and in their relationships with other species. Due to the interdependence among taxa, ecological communities present a compelling opportunity to explore how interactions among species may lead to a shared response to historical events. Here we collect single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from five commensal arthropods associated with...

Data from: A combination of sexual and ecological divergence contributes to rearrangement spread during initial stages of speciation

Genevieve M. Kozak, Crista B. Wadsworth, Shoshanna C. Kahne, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, Richard G. Harrison, Brad S. Coates & Erik B. Dopman
Chromosomal rearrangements between sympatric species often contain multiple loci contributing to assortative mating, local adaptation, and hybrid sterility. When and how these associations arise during the process of speciation remains a subject of debate. Here, we address the relative roles of local adaptation and assortative mating on the dynamics of rearrangement evolution by studying how a rearrangement co-varies with sexual and ecological trait divergence within a species. Previously, a chromosomal rearrangement that suppresses recombination on...

Data from: Female lizards choose warm, moist nests that improve embryonic survivorship and offspring fitness

Shu-Ran Li, Xin Hao, Yang Wang, Bao-Jun Sun, Jun-Huai Bi, Yong-Pu Zhang, Fredric J. Janzen & Wei-Guo Du
1. The fitness consequence of maternal nest-site choice has attracted increasing scientific attention, but field studies identifying the long-term effects of nest-site choice on offspring survival and reproductive success are still rare in vertebrates. 2. To investigate the consequences of nest-site choice in lizards, we quantified the thermal and hydric conditions of nest sites that were chosen by female toad-headed agama (Phrynocephalus przewalskii) in the desert steppe of northern China. We also determined the effect...

Data from: Rates of morphological evolution, asymmetry and morphological integration of shell shape in scallops

Emma Sherratt, Jeanne Serb & Dean Adams
Background: Rates of morphological evolution vary across different taxonomic groups, and this has been proposed as one of the main drivers for the great diversity of organisms on Earth. Of the extrinsic factors pertaining to this variation, ecological hypotheses feature prominently in observed differences in phenotypic evolutionary rates across lineages. But complex organisms are inherently modular, comprising distinct body parts that can be differentially affected by external selective pressures. Thus, the evolution of trait covariation...

Data from: Physiology at near-critical temperatures, but not critical limits, varies between two lizard species that partition the thermal environment

Rory S. Telemeco, Eric J. Gangloff, Gerardo A. Cordero, Rebecca L. Polich, Anne M. Bronikowski & Fredric J. Janzen
The mechanisms that mediate the interaction between the thermal environment and species’ ranges are generally uncertain. Thermal environments may directly restrict species when environments exceed tolerance limits (i.e. the fundamental niche). However, thermal environments might also differentially affect relative performance among species prior to fundamental tolerances being met (i.e. the realized niche). We examined stress physiology (plasma glucose and corticosterone), mitochondrial performance, and the muscle metabolome of congeneric lizards that naturally partition the thermal niche,...

Data from: Tropical tree species traits drive soil cation dynamics via effects on pH: a proposed conceptual framework

Ann E. Russell, Steven J. Hall & James W. Raich
Humid tropical forests are major players in the global carbon cycle, despite evidence that cations (rock-derived, positively charged ions) can limit or co-limit net primary productivity (NPP). In mature forests, tight cation cycling, i.e., without leaching losses, could maintain cation stocks on site. That mechanism does not explain how regenerating tropical secondary forest trees start from seeds and accrue large cation stocks in biomass, when growing on soils depleted in available cations. We propose a...

Data from: Multivariate phylogenetic comparative methods: evaluations, comparisons, and recommendations

Dean C. Adams & Michael L. Collyer
Recent years have seen increased interest in phylogenetic comparative analyses of multivariate datasets, but to date the varied proposed approaches have not been extensively examined. Here we review the mathematical properties required of any multivariate method, and specifically evaluate existing multivariate phylogenetic comparative methods in this context. Phylogenetic comparative methods based on the full multivariate likelihood are robust to levels of covariation among trait dimensions and are insensitive to the orientation of the dataset, but...

Data from: Herbivores safeguard plant diversity by reducing variability in dominance

Brent Mortensen, Brent Danielson, Stan W. Harpole, Juan Alberti, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Lori Biederman, Elizabeth T. Borer, Marc W. Cadotte, John M. Dwyer, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Pablo Luis Peri, Eric W. Seabloom & W. Stanley Harpole
1. Reductions in community evenness can lead to local extinctions as dominant species exclude subordinate species; however, herbivores can prevent competitive exclusion by consuming otherwise dominant plant species, thus increasing evenness. While these predictions logically result from chronic, gradual reductions in evenness, rapid, temporary pulses of dominance may also reduce species richness. Short pulses of dominance can occur as biotic or abiotic conditions temporarily favor one or a few species, manifested as increased temporal variability...

Data from: Seed polyphenols in a diverse tropical plant community

Sofia Gripenberg, Jadranka Rota, Jorma Kim, S. Joseph Wright, Nancy C. Garwood, Evan C. Fricke, Paul-Camilo Zalamea & Juha-Pekka Salminen
1. Polyphenols are one of the most common groups of secondary metabolites in plants and thought to play a key role in enhancing plant fitness by protecting plants against enemies. Although enemy-inflicted mortality at the seed stage can be an important regulator of plant populations and a key determinant of community structure, few studies have assessed community-level patterns of polyphenol content in seeds. 2. We describe the distribution of the main seed polyphenol groups across...

Data from: Segmental allotetraploidy generates extensive homeologous expression rewiring and phenotypic diversity at the population level in rice

Yue Sun, Ying Wu, Chunwu Yang, Shuai Sun, Xiuyun Lin, Lixia Liu, Chunming Xu, Jonathan F. Wendel, Lei Gong & Bao Liu
Allopolyploidization, i.e., concomitant merging and doubling of two or more divergent genomes in a common nucleus/cytoplasm, is known to instantly alter genome-wide transcriptome dynamics, a phenomenon referred to as “transcriptomic shock”. However, the immediate effects of transcriptomic alteration in generating phenotypic diversity at the population level remain under-investigated. Here, we employed the MassARRAY-based Sequenom platform to assess and compare orthologous, allelic, and homeologous gene expression status in two tissues (leaf and root) of a set...

Data from: Contrasting ecological roles of non-native ungulates in a novel ecosystem

Ann Marie Gawel, Haldre S. Rogers, Ross H. Miller & Alexander M. Kerr
Conservation has long focused on preserving or restoring pristine ecosystems. However, understanding and managing novel ecosystems has grown in importance as they outnumber pristine ecosystems worldwide. While non-native species may be neutral or detrimental in pristine ecosystems, it is possible that even notorious invaders could play beneficial or mixed roles in novel ecosystems. We examined the effects of two long-established non-native species – Philippine deer (Rusa marianna) and feral pigs (Sus scrofa) – in Guam,...

Data from: Maternal and nourishment factors interact to influence offspring developmental trajectories in social wasps

Jennifer M. Jandt, Sainath Suryanarayanan, John C. Hermanson, Robert L. Jeanne & Amy L. Toth
The social and nutritional environments during early development have the potential to affect offspring traits, but the mechanisms and molecular underpinnings of these effects remain elusive. We used Polistes fuscatus paper wasps to dissect how maternally controlled factors (vibrational signals and nourishment) interact to induce different caste developmental trajectories in female offspring, leading to worker or reproductive (gyne) traits. We established a set of caste phenotype biomarkers in P. fuscatus females, finding that gyne-destined individuals...

Data from: Mutualistic strategies minimize coextinction in plant-disperser networks

Evan C. Fricke, Joshua J. Tewksbury, Elizabeth M. Wandrag & Haldre S. Rogers
The global decline of mutualists such as pollinators and seed dispersers may cause negative direct and indirect impacts on biodiversity. Mutualistic network models used to understand the stability of mutualistic systems indicate that species with low partner diversity are most vulnerable to coextinction following mutualism disruption. However, existing models have not considered how species vary in their dependence on mutualistic interactions for reproduction or survival, overlooking the potential influence of this variation on species' coextinction...

Data from: Genomic analysis suggests KITLG is responsible for a roan pattern in two Pakistani goat breeds

Andrea Talenti, Francesca Bertolini, Jamie Williams, Muhammad Moaeen-Ud-Din, Stefano Frattini, Beatrice Coizet, Giulio Pagnacco, Jim Reecy, Max Rothschild, Paola Crepaldi, James Reecy & Max F Rothschild
The roan coat color pattern is described as the presence of white hairs intermixed with pigmented hairs. This kind of pigmentation pattern has been observed in many domestic species, including the goat. The molecular mechanisms and inheritance that underlie this pattern are known for some species and the KITLG gene has been shown associated with this phenotype. To date, no research effort has been done to find the gene(s) that controls roan coat color pattern...

Data from: Cover crop root contributions to soil carbon in a no-till corn bioenergy cropping system

Emily E. Austin, Kyle Wickings, Marshall D. McDaniel, G. Philip Robertson & A. Stuart Grandy
Crop residues are potential biofuel feedstocks, but residue removal may reduce soil carbon (C). The inclusion of a cover crop in a corn bioenergy system could provide additional biomass, mitigating the negative effects of residue removal by adding to stable soil C pools. In a no-till continuous corn bioenergy system in the northern US Corn Belt, we used 13CO2 pulse labeling to trace plant C from a winter rye (Secale cereale) cover crop into different...

Data from: A phylogenetic comparative method for evaluating trait coevolution across two phylogenies for sets of interacting species

Dean C. Adams & John D. Nason
Evaluating trait correlations across species within a lineage via phylogenetic regression is fundamental to comparative evolutionary biology, but when traits of interest are derived from two sets of lineages that co-evolve with one another, methods for evaluating such patterns in a dual-phylogenetic context remain underdeveloped. Here we extend multivariate permutation-based phylogenetic regression to evaluate trait correlations in two sets of interacting species while accounting for their respective phylogenies. This extension is appropriate for both univariate...

Data from: Brazilian sugarcane ethanol as an expandable green alternative to crude oil use

Deepak Jaiswal, Amanda P. De Souza, Søren Larsen, David S. LeBauer, Fernando E. Miguez, Gerd Sparovek, Germán Bollero, Marcos S. Buckeridge & Stephen P. Long
Reduction of CO2 emissions will require a transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy sources. Expansion of Brazilian sugarcane ethanol1, 2 provides one near-term scalable solution to reduce CO2 emissions from the global transport sector. In contrast to corn ethanol, the Brazilian sugarcane ethanol system may offset 86% of CO2 emissions compared to oil use, and emissions resulting from land-use change to sugarcane are paid back in just 2–8 years3, 4. But, it has been...

Data from: Introgression between divergent corn borer species in a region of sympatry: implications on the evolution and adaptation of pest arthropods

Yangzhou Wang, Kyung Seok Kim, Wenchao Guo, Qiyun Li, Yunyue Zhang, Zhenying Wang & Brad S. Coates
The Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis, and European corn borer, O. nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), cause damage to cultivated maize in spatially distinct geographies, and have evolved divergent hydrocarbons as the basis of sexual communication. The Yili area of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in China represents the only known region where O. furnacalis has invaded a native O. nubilalis range, and these two corn borer species have made secondary contact. Genetic differentiation was estimated between Ostrinia...

Data from: Among-individual heterogeneity in maternal behaviour and physiology affects reproductive allocation and offspring life-history traits in the garter snake Thamnophis elegans

Eric J. Gangloff, Amanda M. Sparkman & Anne M. Bronikowski
Accumulating evidence suggests that within-individual plasticity of behavioural and physiological traits is limited, resulting in stable among-individual differences in these aspects of the phenotype. Furthermore, these traits often covary within individuals, resulting in a continuum of correlated phenotypic variation among individuals within populations and species. This heterogeneity, in turn, affects individual fitness and can have cross-generational effects. Patterns of trait covariation, among-individual differences, and subsequent fitness consequences have long been recognized in reptiles. Here, we...

Data from: Predation drives morphological convergence in the Gambusia panuco species group among lotic and lentic habitats

Eric K. Moody & M.L. Lozano-Vilano
Fish morphology is often constrained by a trade-off between optimizing steady vs. unsteady swimming performance due to opposing effects of caudal peduncle size. Lotic environments tend to select for steady swimming performance, leading to smaller caudal peduncles, while predators tend to select for unsteady swimming performance, leading to larger caudal peduncles. However, it is unclear which aspect of performance should be optimized across heterogeneous flow and predation environments and how this heterogeneity may affect parallel...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    23

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23

Affiliations

  • Iowa State University
    23
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • Lund University
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • University of Guam
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1