3 Works

Data from: Phylogeography and adaptation genetics of stickleback from the Haida Gwaii archipelago revealed using genome-wide SNP genotyping

Bruce E. Deagle, Felicity C. Jones, Devin M. Absher, David M. Kingsley & Thomas E. Reimchen
Threespine stickleback populations are model systems for studying adaptive evolution and the underlying genetics. In lakes on the Haida Gwaii archipelago (off western Canada), stickleback have undergone a remarkable local radiation and show phenotypic diversity matching that seen throughout the species distribution. To provide a historical context for this radiation, we surveyed genetic variation at >1000 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci in stickleback from over 100 populations. SNPs included markers evenly distributed throughout genome and...

Data from: Arthropod diversity in a tropical forest

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, François Guilhaumon, Olivier Missa, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Jürgen Schmidl, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jon R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H. C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan … & Maurice Leponce
Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6,144 arthropod species from 0.48 ha and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas...

Data from: Infectious adaptation: potential host range of a defensive endosymbiont in Drosophila

Tamara S. Haselkorn, Sarah N. Cockburn, Phineas T. Hamilton, Steve. J Perlman & John Jaenike
Maternally transmitted symbionts persist over macroevolutionary time scales by undergoing occasional lateral transfer to new host species. To invade a new species, a symbiont must survive and reproduce in the new host, undergo maternal transmission, and confer a selective benefit sufficient to overcome losses due to imperfect maternal transmission. Drosophila neotestacea is naturally infected with a strain of Spiroplasma that restores fertility to nematode-parasitized females, which are otherwise sterilized by parasitism. We experimentally transferred Spiroplasma...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • University of Victoria
    3
  • Universidad De Panama
    1
  • National Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
    1
  • Research Institute for Nature and Forest
    1
  • Natural History Museum
    1
  • University of Toulouse
    1
  • Université Libre de Bruxelles
    1
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    1