9 Works

Data from: Past tree influence and prescribed fire exert strong controls on reassembly of mountain grasslands after tree removal

Charles B. Halpern, Joseph A. Antos, Shan Kothari & Annette M. Olson
Woody-plant encroachment represents a global threat to grasslands. Although the causes and consequences of this regime shift have received substantial attention, the processes that constrain reassembly of the grassland state remain poorly understood. We experimentally tested two potentially important controls on reassembly—the past influence of trees and the effects of fire—in conifer-invaded grasslands (mountain meadows) of western Oregon. Previously, we had reconstructed the history of tree invasion at fine spatial and temporal resolution. Using small...

Data from: Testing conceptual models of early plant succession across a disturbance gradient

Cynthia C. Chang, Charles B. Halpern, Joseph A. Antos, Meghan L. Avolio, Abir Biswas, James E. Cook, Roger Del Moral, Dylan G. Fischer, Andrés Holz, Robert J. Pabst, Mark E. Swanson & Donald B. Zobel
1.Studies of succession have a long history in ecology, but rigorous tests of general, unifying principles are rare. One barrier to these tests of theory is the paucity of longitudinal studies that span the broad gradients of disturbance severity that characterize large, infrequent disturbances. The cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens (Washington, USA) in 1980 produced a heterogeneous landscape of disturbance conditions, including primary to secondary successional habitats, affording a unique opportunity to explore how...

Data from: Sex and occupation time influence niche space of a recovering keystone predator

Erin U. Rechsteiner, Jane C. Watson, M. Tim Tinker, Linda M. Nichol, Matthew J. Morgan Henderson, Christie J. McMIllan, Mike DeRoos, Marie C. Fournier, Anne K. Salomon, Leah D. Honka & Chris T. Darimont
Predators exert strong effects on ecological communities, particularly when they re-occupy areas after decades of extirpation. Within species, such effects can vary over time and by sex, and cascade across trophic levels. We used a space-for-time substitution to make foraging observations of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) across a gradient of re-occupation (1–30 yrs), and nMDS analysis to ask if 1) sea otter niche space varies as a function of occupation time, and 2) if niche...

Data from: Raising the bar: recovery ambition for species at risk in canada and the US

Kylee A. Pawluk, Caroline H. Fox, Christina N. Service, Eva H. Stredulinsky & Heather Bryan
Routinely crossing international borders and/or persisting in populations across multiple countries, species are commonly subject to a patchwork of endangered species legislation. Canada and the United States share numerous endangered species; their respective acts, the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and the Endangered Species Act (ESA), require documents that outline requirements for species recovery. Although there are many priorities for improving endangered species legislation effectiveness, species recovery goals are a crucial component. We compared recovery...

Data from: Contrasting conifer species productivity in relation to soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus stoichiometry of British Columbia perhumid rainforests

John Marty Kranabetter, Ariana Sholinder & Louise De Montigny
Temperate rainforest soils of the Pacific Northwest are often carbon (C) rich and encompass a wide range in fertility reflecting varying nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability. Soil resource stoichiometry (C:N:P) may provide an effective measure of site nutrient status and help refine species-dependent patterns in forest productivity across edaphic gradients. We determined mineral soil and forest floor nutrient concentrations across very wet (perhumid) rainforest sites of southwestern Vancouver Island (Canada), and employed soil element...

Data from: Publication reform to safeguard wildlife from researcher harm

Kate A. Field, Paul C. Paquet, Kyle Artelle, Gilbert Proulx, Ryan K. Brook & Chris T. Darimont
Despite abundant focus on responsible care of laboratory animals, we argue that inattention to the maltreatment of wildlife constitutes an ethical blind spot in contemporary animal research. We begin by reviewing significant shortcomings in legal and institutional oversight, arguing for the relatively rapid and transformational potential of editorial oversight at journals in preventing harm to vertebrates studied in the field and outside the direct supervision of institutions. Straightforward changes to animal care policies in journals,...

Data from: An approach to incorporating inferred connectivity of adult movement into marine protected area design with limited data

Sarah K. Friesen, Rebecca Martone, Emily Rubidge, Jacopo A. Baggio & Natalie Ban
Marine protected areas (MPAs) are important conservation tools that can support the resilience of marine ecosystems. Many countries, including Canada, have committed to protecting at least 10% of their marine areas under the Convention on Biological Diversity’s Aichi Target 11, which includes connectivity as a key aspect. Connectivity, the movement of individuals among habitats, can enhance population stability and resilience within and among MPAs. However, little is known about regional spatial patterns of marine ecological...

The functional organization of excitation and inhibition in the dendritic arbors of retinal direction-selective ganglion cells

Gautam Awatramani
Recent studies indicate that the precise timing and location of excitation and inhibition (E/I) within active dendritic trees can significantly impact neuronal function. How excitatory and inhibitory inputs are functionally organized at the subcellular level in intact circuits remains unclear. To address this issue, we took advantage of the retinal direction-selective ganglion cell circuit, in which directionally tuned inhibitory GABAergic input arising from starburst amacrine cells shape direction-selective dendritic responses. We combined two-photon calcium imaging...

Data from: Habitat size thresholds for predators: why damselflies only occur in large bromeliads

Diane Sheila Srivastava, Sarah Louise Amundrud, Jacqueline T. Ngai, Brian M. Starzomski & Jessica Lee Ware
Predators are often more sensitive to habitat size than their prey, and frequently occur in only the largest habitats. Four explanations have been proposed for this pattern: (1) small habitats do not have enough energy to support higher trophic levels; (2) small habitats are less likely to contain particular prey required by specialist predators; (3) small habitats are risky for predators with slow life histories or large body sizes; (4) small habitats are numerically unlikely...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Victoria
    9
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Oregon State University
    2
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
    2
  • Portland State University
    1
  • Johns Hopkins University
    1
  • University of Saskatchewan
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • Dalhousie University
    1
  • Simon Fraser University
    1