3 Works

Data from: Decoupled evolution of foliar freezing resistance, temperature-niche and morphological leaf traits in Chilean Myrceugenia

Fernanda PĂ©rez, Luis Felipe Hinojosa, Carmen Gloria Ossa, Francisa Campano & Francisca Campano
1. Phylogenetic conservatism of tolerance to freezing temperatures has been cited to explain the tendency of plant lineages to grow in similar climates. However there is little information about whether or not freezing resistance is conserved across phylogenies, and whether conservatism of physiological traits could explain conservatism of realized climatic niches. Here we compared the phylogenetical lability of realized climatic niche, foliar freezing resistance, and four morphological leaf traits that are generally considered adaptations to...

Data from: O father where art thou? Paternity analyses in a natural population of the haploid-diploid seaweed Chrondrus crispus

Stacy A. Krueger-Hadfield, Denis Roze, Christophe Destombe, Juan A. Correa & Myriam Valero
The link between life history traits and mating systems in diploid organisms has been extensively addressed in the literature, whereas the degree of selfing and/or inbreeding in natural populations of haploid–diploid organisms, in which haploid gametophytes alternate with diploid sporophytes, has been rarely measured. Dioecy has often been used as a proxy for the mating system in these organisms. Yet, dioecy does not prevent the fusion of gametes from male and female gametophytes originating from...

Data from: Tracing the trans-Pacific evolutionary history of a domesticated seaweed (Gracilaria chilensis) with archaeological and genetic data

Marie-Laure Guillemin, Myriam Valero, Sylvain Faugeron, Wendy Nelson & Christophe Destombe
The history of a domesticated marine macroalga is studied using archaeological, phylogeographic and population genetic tools. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses demonstrated that the cultivated red alga Gracilaria chilensis colonised the Chilean coast from New Zealand. Combining archaeological observations with phylogeographic data provided evidence that exchanges between New Zealand and Chile have occurred at least before the Holocene, likely at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and we suggest that migration probably occurred...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Pontifical Catholic University of Chile
    3
  • Evolutionary Biology and Ecology of Algae
    2
  • University Austral de Chile
    1
  • University of Auckland
    1
  • University of Chile
    1