328 Works

Plant census and microenvironment dataset from Mt. Baldy, Colorado, USA, 2014-2017

B. Blonder, R.E. Kapas, R.M. Dalton, B.J. Graae, J.M. Heiling & Ø.H. Opedal
The data comprise a long-term study of alpine plant community dynamics in the Gunnison National Forest of Colorado. The data comprise annual census data for all plants (including seedlings) in each of 50 2x2m plots, including information on size, reproduction, life stage, and mortality, with all plants identified and geo-located. These data are also made available transformed to provide individual-level estimates of growth, survival, fecundity, and recruitment. The dataset covers several thousand individuals of approximately...

Social media use and preferences of visitors to Crater Lake National Park: Data from a 2014 on-site survey

Rosemary B. Keane & Jordan Smith
These data describe the use, and preferences for, social media among visitors to Crater Lake National Park (Oregon, USA)

Spend to save: investigating the property acquisition process for risk reduction in Aotearoa New Zealand

Wendy S. A. Saunders & G. Smith
Limiting development in known high-hazard areas is among one of the most effective tools available to local governments to reduce future hazard risk and increase resilience, and yet, the widespread practice of acquiring hazard-prone properties and converting the land to open space in New Zealand remains highly varied. This report outlines Aotearoa New Zealand examples of hazard-prone housing acquisition (or buyout) processes, based on four legislative mechanisms: special legislation (Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Act 2011), the...

Uncertainty in health impact assessments of smoke from a wildfire event

Megan Johnson & Fernando Garcia-Menendez
Manuscript abstract: Wildfires cause elevated air pollution that can be detrimental to human health. However, health impact assessments associated with emissions from wildfire events are subject to uncertainty arising from different sources. Here, we quantify and compare major uncertainties in mortality and morbidity outcomes of exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution estimated for a series of wildfires in the Southeastern U.S. We present an approach to compare uncertainty in estimated health impacts specifically due...

Experimental N and P additions relieve stoichiometric constraints on organic-matter flows through five stream food webs

Lee Demi, Jonathan Benstead, Amy Rosemond & John Maerz
1. Human activities have dramatically altered global patterns of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability. This pervasive nutrient pollution is changing basal resource quality in food webs, thereby affecting rates of biological productivity and the pathways of energy and material flow to higher trophic levels. 2. Here, we investigate how the stoichiometric quality of basal resources modulates patterns of material flow through food webs by characterizing the effects of experimental N and P enrichment on...

MVCNN++: CAD model shape classification and retrieval using multi-view convolutional neural networks

Binil Starly, Akshay Bharadwaj & Atin Angrish
Deep neural networks have shown promising success towards the classification and retrieval tasks for images and text data. While there have been several implementations of deep networks in the area of computer graphics, these algorithms do not translate easily across different datasets, especially for shapes used in product design and manufacturing domain. Unlike datasets used in the 3D shape classification and retrieval in the computer graphics domain, engineering level description of 3D models do not...

Amino acids (AA) all genes for: Beyond Drosophila: resolving the rapid radiation of schizophoran flies with phylotranscriptomics

Keith Bayless, Michelle Trautwein, Karen Meusemann, David Yeates & Brian Wiegmann
Background: The largest radiation of animal life since the end Cretaceous extinction event 66 million years ago is that of schizophoran flies: a third of fly diversity including Drosophila lab fruit flies, house flies, and many other well and poorly known true flies. Rapid diversification has hindered previous attempts to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships among major schizophoran clades. A robust phylogenetic hypothesis for the major lineages containing these 55,000 described species would be critical to...

Robustness of the Dorsal morphogen gradient with respect to morphogen dosage

Gregory Reeves, Hadel Al Asafen, Sophia Carrell-Noel, Allison Schloop, Jeramey Friedman & Prasad Bandodkar
In multicellular organisms, the timing and placement of gene expression in a developing tissue assigns the fate of each cell in the embryo in order for a uniform field of cells to differentiate into a reproducible pattern of organs and tissues. This positional information is often achieved through the action of spatial gradients of morphogens. Spatial patterns of gene expression are paradoxically robust to variations in morphogen dosage, given that, by definition, gene expression must...

Do dog breeds differ in pain sensitivity? Veterinarians and the public believe they do

Margaret Gruen, Brian Hare & Philip White
Humans do not respond to the pain of all humans equally; physical appearance and associated group identity affect how people respond to the pain of others. Here we ask if a similar differential response occurs when humans evaluate different individuals of another species. Beliefs about pain in pet dogs (Canis familiaris) provide a powerful test, since dogs vary so much in size, shape, and color, and are often associated with behavioral stereotypes. Using an on-line...

Dityrosine formation via reactive oxygen consumption yields increasingly recalcitrant humic-like fluorescent organic matter in the ocean

Ryan Paerl, Iliana Claudio, Michael Shields, Thomas Bianchi & Christopher Osburn
Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a massive elemental pool on Earth and is thought to consist of a chemically complex mixture of molecules. Part of marine DOM is fluorescent (FDOM) and includes humic-like compounds. The chemical composition of, and biochemical pathways that yield, autochthonous humic-like FDOM in the ocean is largely unknown. Inspired by medical and biochemical research detailing the formation of colored and fluorescent dityrosine via peroxidase mediated reactions, we used fluorometry and...

Maintaining historic disturbance regimes increases species’ resilience to catastrophic hurricanes

Erica H Henry, Martha O Burford Reiskind, Aerin Land & Nick M Haddad
As habitat loss and fragmentation, urbanization, and global climate change accelerate, conservation of rare ecosystems increasingly relies on human intervention. However, any conservation strategy is vulnerable to unpredictable, catastrophic events. Whether active management increases or decreases a system’s resilience to these events remains unknown. Following Hurricane Irma’s landfall in our habitat restoration study sites, we found that rare ecosystems with active, human-imposed management suffered less damage in a hurricane’s path than unmanaged systems. At the...

Data from: Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus sclerotia: acquisition of novel alleles from soil populations and uniparental mitochondrial inheritance

Bruce W. Horn, Richard M. Gell, Rakhi Singh, Ronald B. Sorensen & Ignazio Carbone
Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of...

Data from: Genetic basis of continuous variation in the levels and modular inheritance of pigmentation in cichlid fishes

R. Craig Albertson, Kara E. Powder, Yinan Hu, Kaitlin P. Coyle, Reade B. Roberts & Kevin J. Parsons
Variation in pigmentation type and levels is a hallmark of myriad evolutionary radiations, and biologists have long been fascinated by the factors that promote and maintain variation in coloration across populations. Here we provide insights into the genetic basis of complex and continuous patterns of color variation in cichlid fishes, which offer a vast diversity of pigmentation patterns that have evolved in response to both natural and sexual selection. Specifically, we crossed two divergent cichlid...

Data from: Invasion of the Hawaiian Islands by a parasite infecting imperiled stream fishes

Roderick B. Gagne, C. Grace Sprehn, Fernando Alda, Peter B. McIntyre, James F. Gilliam & Michael J. Blum
Points of origin and pathways of spread are often poorly understood for introduced parasites that drive disease emergence in imperiled native species. Co-introduction of parasites with non-native hosts is of particular concern in remote areas like the Hawaiian Islands, where the introduced nematode Camallanus cotti has become the most prevalent parasite of at-risk native stream fishes. In this study, we evaluated the prevailing hypothesis that C. cotti entered the Hawaiian Islands with poeciliid fishes from...

Data from: Physiological thermal limits predict differential responses of bees to urban heat-island effects

April L. Hamblin, Elsa Youngsteadt, Margarita M. López-Uribe & Steven D. Frank
Changes in community composition are an important, but hard to predict, effect of climate change. Here, we use a wild-bee study system to test the ability of critical thermal maxima (CTmax, a measure of heat tolerance) to predict community responses to urban heat-island effects in Raleigh, NC, USA. Among 15 focal species, CTmax ranged from 44.6 to 51.3°C, and was strongly predictive of population responses to urban warming across 18 study sites (r2 = 0.44)....

Data from: Molecular mapping and candidate gene analysis for numerous spines on the fruit of cucumber

Shengping Zhang, Shulin Liu, Han Miao, Min Wang, Panna Liu, Todd C. Wehner & Xingfang Gu
Number of spines on the fruit is an important quality trait in cucumber. The inheritance and identification of molecular markers for fruit spine density gene can provide a basis for breeding and lay the foundation for gene cloning. Cucumber inbred lines NCG-122 with numerous spines and NCG-121 with few spines were used for genetic analysis and gene mapping in this study. Genetic analysis showed that the numerous spines trait in NCG-122 was qualitative, and a...

Data from: Defining the role of the MADS-box gene, Zea agamous like1, a target of selection during maize domestication

David M. Wills, Zhou Fang, Alessandra M. York, James B. Holland & John F. Doebley
Genomic scans for genes that show the signature of past selection have been widely applied to a number of species and have identified a large number of selection candidate genes. In cultivated maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) selection scans have identified several hundred candidate domestication genes by comparing nucleotide diversity and differentiation between maize and its progenitor, teosinte (Z. mays ssp. parviglumis). One of these is a gene called zea agamous-like1 (zagl1), a MADS-box transcription...

Data from: Changes in taste neurons support the emergence of an adaptive behavior in cockroaches

Ayako Wada-Katsumata, Jules Silverman & Coby Schal
In response to the anthropogenic assault of toxic baits, populations of the German cockroach have rapidly evolved an adaptive behavioral aversion to glucose (a phagostimulant component of baits). We hypothesized that changes in the peripheral gustatory system are responsible for glucose aversion. In both wild-type and glucose-averse (GA) cockroaches, D-fructose and D-glucose stimulated sugar–gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs), whereas the deterrent caffeine stimulated bitter-GRNs. In contrast, in GA cockroaches, D-glucose also stimulated bitter-GRNs and suppressed the...

Data from: Tick exposure and extreme climate events impact survival and threaten the persistence of a long-lived lizard

Alice R. Jones, C. Michael Bull, Barry W. Brook, Konstans Wells, Kenneth H. Pollock & Damien A. Fordham
1. Assessing the impacts of multiple, often synergistic, stressors on the population dynamics of long-lived species is becoming increasingly important due to recent and future global change. 2. Tiliqua rugosa (sleepy lizard) is a long-lived skink (>30 years) that is adapted to survive in semi-arid environments with varying levels of parasite exposure and highly seasonal food availability. We used an exhaustive database of 30-years of capture-mark-recapture records to quantify the impacts of both parasite exposure...

Data from: Inbreeding tolerance as a pre-adapted trait for invasion success in the invasive ant Brachyponera chinensis

Pierre-André Eyer, Kenji Matsuura, Edward Vargo, Kazuya Kobayashi, Toshihisa Yashiro, Wataru Suehiro, Chihiro Himuro, Tomoyuki Yokoi, Benoit Guénard, Robert R. Dunn, Kazuki Tsuji, Pierre‐André Eyer & Edward L. Vargo
Identifying traits that facilitate species introductions and successful invasions of ecosystems represents a key issue in ecology. Following their establishment into new environments, many non-native species exhibit phenotypic plasticity with post-introduction changes in behavior, morphology or life history traits that allow them to overcome the presumed loss of genetic diversity resulting in inbreeding and reduced adaptive potential. Here we present a unique strategy in the invasive ant Brachyponera chinensis (Emery), in which inbreeding tolerance is...

Data from: Clinal variation in colony breeding structure and level of inbreeding in the subterranean termites Reticulitermes flavipes and R. grassei

Edward L. Vargo, Laurianne Leniaud, Lois E. Swoboda, Sarah E. Diamond, Michael D. Weiser, Dini M. Miller & Anne-Geneviève Bagnères-Urbany
Social insects exhibit remarkable variation in their colony breeding structures, both within and among species. Ecological factors are believed to be important in shaping reproductive traits of social insect colonies, yet there is little information linking specific environmental variables with differences in breeding structure. Subterranean termites (Rhinotermitidae) show exceptional variation in colony breeding structure, differing in the number of reproductives and degree of inbreeding; colonies can be simple families headed by a single pair of...

Data from: Seasonal cycles, phylogenetic assembly, and functional diversity of orchid bee communities

Santiago R. Ramírez, Carlos Hernández, Andres Link & Margarita M. López-Uribe
Neotropical rainforests sustain some of the most diverse terrestrial communities on Earth. Euglossine (or orchid) bees are a diverse lineage of insect pollinators distributed throughout the American tropics, where they provide pollination services to a staggering diversity of flowering plant taxa. Elucidating the seasonal patterns of phylogenetic assembly and functional trait diversity of bee communities can shed new light into the mechanisms that govern the assembly of bee pollinator communities and the potential effects of...

Data from: Predation's role in life-history evolution of a livebearing fish and a test of the Trexler-DeAngelis model of maternal provisioning

Rüdiger Riesch, Ryan A. Martin & R. Brian Langerhans
Populations experiencing consistent differences in predation risk and resource availability are expected to follow divergent evolutionary trajectories. For example, live-history theory makes specific predictions for how predation should drive life-history evolution, and according to the Trexler-DeAngelis model for the evolution of matrotrophy, post-fertilization maternal provisioning is most likely to evolve in environments with consistent, high levels of resource availability. Using the model system of Bahamas mosquitofish (Gambusia hubbsi) inhabiting blue holes with and without the...

Data from: Balancing selection for aflatoxin in Aspergillus flavus is maintained through interference competition with, and fungivory by insects

Milton T. Drott, Brian P. Lazzaro, Dan L. Brown, Ignazio Carbone & Michael G. Milgroom
The role of microbial secondary metabolites in the ecology of the organisms that produce them remains poorly understood. Variation in aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus is maintained by balancing selection, but the ecological function and impact on fungal fitness of this compound are unknown. We hypothesize that balancing selection for aflatoxin production in A. flavus is driven by interaction with insects. To test this, we competed naturally occurring aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic fungal isolates against Drosophila...

Data from: Co-occurrence dynamics of endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbits and free-ranging domestic cats: prey responses to an exotic predator removal program

Michael V. Cove, Beth Gardner, Theodore R. Simons & Allan F. O'Connell
The Lower Keys marsh rabbit is one of many endangered endemic species of the Florida Keys. The main threats are habitat loss and fragmentation from sea level rise, development, and habitat succession. Exotic predators such as free-ranging domestic cats pose an additional threat to these endangered small mammals. Management strategies have focused on habitat restoration and exotic predator control. However, the effectiveness of predator removal and the effects of anthropogenic habitat modifications and restoration have...

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