295 Works

Data from: Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants

Clint A. Penick, Sarah E. Diamond, Nathan J. Sanders & Robert R. Dunn
How species respond to temperature change depends in large part on their physiology. Physiological traits, such as critical thermal limits (CTmax and CTmin), provide estimates of thermal performance but may not capture the full impacts of temperature on fitness. Rather, thermal performance likely depends on a combination of traits—including thermal limits—that vary among species. Here we examine how thermal limits correlate with the main components that influence fitness in ants. First, we compare how temperature...

Data from: Betweenness centrality as predictor for forces in granular packings

Jonathan E. Kollmer & Karen E. Daniels
A load applied to a jammed frictional granular system will be localized into a network of force chains making inter-particle connections throughout the system. Because such systems are typically under-constrained, the observed force network is not unique to a given particle configuration, but instead varies upon repeated formation. In this paper, we examine the ensemble of force chain configurations created under repeated assembly in order to develop tools to statistically forecast the observed force network....

Data from: Inbreeding tolerance as a pre-adapted trait for invasion success in the invasive ant Brachyponera chinensis

Pierre-André Eyer, Kenji Matsuura, Edward Vargo, Kazuya Kobayashi, Toshihisa Yashiro, Wataru Suehiro, Chihiro Himuro, Tomoyuki Yokoi, Benoit Guénard, Robert R. Dunn, Kazuki Tsuji, Pierre‐André Eyer & Edward L. Vargo
Identifying traits that facilitate species introductions and successful invasions of ecosystems represents a key issue in ecology. Following their establishment into new environments, many non-native species exhibit phenotypic plasticity with post-introduction changes in behavior, morphology or life history traits that allow them to overcome the presumed loss of genetic diversity resulting in inbreeding and reduced adaptive potential. Here we present a unique strategy in the invasive ant Brachyponera chinensis (Emery), in which inbreeding tolerance is...

Data from: Direct and indirect effects of nitrogen enrichment on soil organisms and carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a semi‐arid grassland

Dima Chen, Wen Xing, Zhichun Lan, Muhammad Saleem, Yunqiqige Wu, Shuijin Hu & Yongfei Bai
1. Semi-arid grasslands on the Mongolian Plateau are expected to experience high inputs of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen in this century. It remains unclear, however, how soil organisms and nutrient cycling are directly affected by N enrichment (i.e., without mediation by plant input to soil) vs. indirectly affected via changes in plant-related inputs to soils resulting from N enrichment. 2. To test the direct and indirect effects of N enrichment on soil organisms (bacteria, fungi, and...

Data from: The individual and combined effects of snowmelt timing and frost exposure on the reproductive success of montane forbs

Gabriella L. Pardee, Isaac O. Jensen, David W. Inouye & Rebecca E. Irwin
1. Changes from historic weather patterns have affected the phenology of many organisms worldwide. Altered phenology can introduce organisms to novel abiotic conditions during growth and modify species interactions, both of which could drive changes in reproduction. 2. We explored how climate change can alter plant reproduction using an experiment in which we manipulated the individual and combined effects of snowmelt timing and frost exposure, and measured subsequent effects on flowering phenology, peak flower density,...

Data from: Snap-jaw morphology is specialized for high-speed power amplification in the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae

Fredrick J. Larabee, Adrian A. Smith & Andrew V. Suarez
What is the limit of animal speed and what mechanisms produce the fastest movements? More than natural history trivia, the answer provides key insight into the form-function relationship of musculoskeletal movement and can determine the outcome of predator-prey interactions. The fastest known animal movements belong to arthropods, including trap-jaw ants, mantis shrimp, and froghoppers, that have incorporated latches and springs into their appendage systems to overcome the limits of muscle power. In contrast to these...

Data from: Reconciling multiple impacts of nitrogen enrichment on soil carbon: plant, microbial, and geochemical controls

Chenglong Ye, Dima Chen, Steven J. Hall, Shang Pan, Xuebin Yan, Tongshuo Bai, Hui Guo, Yi Zhang, Yongfei Bai & Shuijin Hu
Impacts of reactive nitrogen (N) inputs on ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics are highly variable, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we proposed a new conceptual framework that integrates plant, microbial, and geochemical mechanisms to reconcile diverse and contrasting impacts of N on soil C. This framework was tested using long-term N enrichment and acid addition experiments in a Mongolian steppe grassland. Distinct mechanisms could explain effects of N on particulate and mineral-associated soil C...

Data from: Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure

Heloise Gibb, Nathan J. Sanders, Robert R. Dunn, Simon Watson, Manoli Photakis, Silvia Abril, Alan N. Andersen, Elena Angulo, Inge Armbrecht, Xavier Arnan, Fabricio B. Baccaro, Tom R. Bishop, Raphael Boulay, Cristina Castracani, Israel Del Toro, Thibaut Delsinne, Mireia Diaz, David A. Donoso, Martha L. Enríquez, Tom M. Fayle, Donald H. Feener, Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Crisanto Gómez, Donato A. Grasso, Sarah Groc … & C. Gomez
Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction...

Data from: Seasonal cycles, phylogenetic assembly, and functional diversity of orchid bee communities

Santiago R. Ramírez, Carlos Hernández, Andres Link & Margarita M. López-Uribe
Neotropical rainforests sustain some of the most diverse terrestrial communities on Earth. Euglossine (or orchid) bees are a diverse lineage of insect pollinators distributed throughout the American tropics, where they provide pollination services to a staggering diversity of flowering plant taxa. Elucidating the seasonal patterns of phylogenetic assembly and functional trait diversity of bee communities can shed new light into the mechanisms that govern the assembly of bee pollinator communities and the potential effects of...

Data from: Stable isotopes reveal links between human food inputs and urban ant diets

Clint A. Penick, Amy M. Savage & Robert R. Dunn
The amount of energy consumed within an average city block is an order of magnitude higher than that consumed in any other ecosystem over a similar area. This is driven by human food inputs, but the consequence of these resources for urban animal populations is poorly understood. We investigated the role of human foods in ant diets across an urbanization gradient in Manhattan using carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. We found that some—but not all—ant...

Data from: How shrub encroachment under climate change could threaten pollination services for alpine wildflowers: a case study using the alpine skypilot, Polemonium viscosum

Jessica A. Kettenbach, Nicole Miller-Struttmann, Zoë Moffett & Candace Galen
Under climate change, shrubs encroaching into high altitude plant communities disrupt ecosystem processes. Yet effects of encroachment on pollination mutualisms are poorly understood. Here, we probe potential fitness impacts of interference from encroaching Salix (willows) on pollination quality of the alpine skypilot, Polemonium viscosum. Overlap in flowering time of Salix and Polemonium is a precondition for interference and was surveyed in four extant and 25 historic contact zones. Pollinator sharing was ascertained from observations of...

Data from: An assessment of tree availability as a possible cause of population declines in scavenging raptors

Corinne J. Kendall, Daniel I. Rubenstein, Pamela L. Slater & Ara Monadjem
Lack of suitable nesting trees is an increasingly common issue for avian conservation given rampant habitat and tree destruction around the world. In the African savannah, habitat loss and particularly tree damage caused by elephants have been suggested as possible factors in the decline of large bird species. Given the recent declines of vultures and other scavenging raptors, it is critical to understand if nest availability is a limiting factor for these threatened populations. Loss...

Data from: Defining the role of the MADS-box gene, Zea agamous like1, a target of selection during maize domestication

David M. Wills, Zhou Fang, Alessandra M. York, James B. Holland & John F. Doebley
Genomic scans for genes that show the signature of past selection have been widely applied to a number of species and have identified a large number of selection candidate genes. In cultivated maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) selection scans have identified several hundred candidate domestication genes by comparing nucleotide diversity and differentiation between maize and its progenitor, teosinte (Z. mays ssp. parviglumis). One of these is a gene called zea agamous-like1 (zagl1), a MADS-box transcription...

Data from: Analyzing negative feedback using a synthetic gene network expressed in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo

Ashley Jermusyk, Nicholas P. Murphy & Gregory Reeves
Background: A complex network of gene interactions controls gene regulation throughout development and the life of the organisms. Insights can be made into these processes by studying the functional interactions (or “motifs”) which make up these networks. Results: We sought to understand the functionality of one of these network motifs, negative feedback, in a multi-cellular system. This was accomplished using a synthetic network expressed in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo using the yeast proteins Gal4 (a...

Data from: Attract or defend? Pollen and vegetative secondary chemistry of three pollen-rewarding lupines

Jacob M. Heiling, Daniel Cook, Stephen T. Lee & Rebecca E. Irwin
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Optimal Defense Theory predicts that selection should drive plants to differentially allocate resources for herbivore defense to tissues with high fitness values. As pollen’s primary role is the transport of gametes, plants may be expected to defend it from herbivory. However, for many animal-pollinated plants, pollen serves a secondary role as a pollinator reward. This may present a conflict between selection to defend pollen from herbivores and selection to reward pollinators....

Data from: Molecular mapping and candidate gene analysis for numerous spines on the fruit of cucumber

Shengping Zhang, Shulin Liu, Han Miao, Min Wang, Panna Liu, Todd C. Wehner & Xingfang Gu
Number of spines on the fruit is an important quality trait in cucumber. The inheritance and identification of molecular markers for fruit spine density gene can provide a basis for breeding and lay the foundation for gene cloning. Cucumber inbred lines NCG-122 with numerous spines and NCG-121 with few spines were used for genetic analysis and gene mapping in this study. Genetic analysis showed that the numerous spines trait in NCG-122 was qualitative, and a...

Data from: The use of functional data analysis to evaluate activity in a spontaneous model of degenerative joint disease associated pain in cats

Margaret E. Gruen, Marcela Alfaro-Córdoba, Andrea E. Thomson, Alicia Worth, Ana-Maria Staicu, B. Duncan X. Lascelles & Alicia C. Worth
Accelerometry is used as an objective measure of physical activity in humans and veterinary species. In cats, one important use of accelerometry is in the study of therapeutics designed to treat degenerative joint disease (DJD) associated pain, where it serves as the most widely applied objective outcome measure. These analyses have commonly used summary measures, calculating the mean activity per-minute over days and comparing between treatment periods. While this technique has been effective, information about...

Data from: Enhancing genomic prediction with genome-wide association studies in multiparental maize populations

Yang Bian & James B. Holland
Genome-wide association mapping using dense marker sets has identified some nucleotide variants affecting complex traits that have been validated with fine-mapping and functional analysis. However, many sequence variants associated with complex traits in maize have small effects and low repeatability. In contrast to genome-wide association study (GWAS), genomic prediction (GP) is typically based on models incorporating information from all available markers, rather than modeling effects of individual loci. We considered methods to integrate results of...

Data from: Variation in predation regime drives sex-specific differences in mosquitofish foraging behaviour

Varpu Pärssinen, Kaj Hulthén, Christer Brönmark, Gustaf Ekelund Ugge, Raphael Gollnisch, Simon David Herzog, Nan Hu, Marcus Lee, Yongcui Sha, Martin Škerlep, Jerker Vinterstare, R. Brian Langerhans, P. Anders Nilsson, Caroline Björnerås, Lars-Anders Hansson, Emma Johansson, Karin Rengefors & Huan Zhang
Predation is a well-studied driver of ecological selection on prey traits, which frequently drives divergence in anti-predator performance across environments that vary in predation risk. However, predation also alters prey mortality regimes, where low predation risk often results in higher prey densities and consequently higher intensities of intraspecific resource competition. In addition, predation risk alters the foraging context, as acquiring food can be risky in the presence of predators. Thus, different predation regimes can drive...

Social media use and preferences of visitors to Crater Lake National Park: Data from a 2014 on-site survey

Rosemary B. Keane & Jordan W. Smith
These data describe the use, and preferences for, social media among visitors to Crater Lake National Park (Oregon, USA)

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