377 Works

Data from: Quantifying shape and ecology in avian pedal claws: the relationship between the bony core and keratinous sheath

Brandon Hedrick, Samantha Cordero, Lindsay Zanno, Christopher Noto & Peter Dodson
Terrestrial tetrapods use their claws to interact with their environments in a plethora of ways. Birds in particular have developed a diversity of claw shapes since they are often not bound to terrestrial locomotion and have heterogeneous body masses ranging several orders of magnitude. Numerous previous studies have hypothesized a connection between pedal claw shape and ecological mode in birds, yet have generated conflicting results, spanning from clear ecological groupings based on claw shape to...

Data from: Investigating behavioral drivers of seasonal Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia Coli (STEC) patterns in grazing cattle using an agent-based model

Daniel E. Dawson, Jocelyn H. Keung, Monica G. Napoles, Michael R. Vella, Shi Chen, Mike Sanderson, Cristina Lanzas & Michael W. Sanderson
The causes of seasonal variability in pathogen transmission are not well understood, and have not been comprehensively investigated. In an example for enteric pathogens, incidence of Escherichia coli O157 (STEC) colonization in cattle is consistently higher during warmer months compared to cooler months in various cattle production systems. However, actual mechanisms for this seasonality remain elusive. In addition, the influence of host (cattle) behavior on this pattern has not been thoroughly considered. To that end,...

Data from: Direct detection of male quality can facilitate the evolution of female choosiness and indicators of good genes: evolution across a continuum of indicator mechanisms

Sumit Dhole, Caitlin A. Stern & Maria R. Servedio
The evolution of mating displays as indicators of male quality has been the subject of extensive theoretical and empirical research for over four decades. Research has also addressed the evolution of female mate choice favoring such indicators. Yet, much debate still exists about whether displays can evolve through the indirect benefits of female mate choice. Here, we use a population genetic model to investigate how the extent to which females can directly detect male quality...

Data from: Mammal communities are larger and more diverse in moderately developed areas

Arielle Waldstein Parsons, Tavis Forrester, Megan C. Baker-Whatton, William J. McShea, Christopher T. Rota, Stephanie G. Schuttler, Joshua J. Millspaugh & Roland Kays
Developed areas are thought to have low species diversity, low animal abundance, few native predators, and thus low resilience and ecological function. Working with citizen scientist volunteers to survey mammals at 1427 sites across two development gradients (wild-rural-exurban-suburban-urban) and four plot types (large forests, small forest fragments, open areas and residential yards) in the eastern US, we show that developed areas actually had significantly higher or statistically similar mammalian occupancy, relative abundance, richness and diversity...

Data from: Rapid evolution and the genomic consequences of selection against interspecific mating

Martha O. Burford Reiskind, Paul Labadie, Irka Bargielowski, L. Philip Lounibos & Michael H. Reiskind
While few species introduced into a new environment become invasive, those that do provide critical information on ecological mechanisms that determine invasions success and the evolutionary responses that follow invasion. Aedes albopictus (the Asian tiger mosquito) was introduced into the naturalized range of Aedes aegypti (the yellow fever mosquito) in the USA in the mid-1980s, resulting in the displacement of A. aegypti in much of the southeastern USA. The rapid displacement was likely due to...

Data from: Dynamic occupancy modeling reveals a hierarchy of competition among fishers, grey foxes, and ringtails

David S. Green, Sean M. Matthews, Robert C. Swiers, Richard L. Callas, J. Scott Yaeger, Stuart L. Farber, Michael K. Schwartz & Roger A. Powell
1. Determining how species coexist is critical for understanding functional diversity, niche partitioning and interspecific interactions. Identifying the direct and indirect interactions among sympatric carnivores that enable their coexistence are particularly important to elucidate because they are integral for maintaining ecosystem function. 2. We studied the effects of removing 9 fishers (Pekania pennanti) on their population dynamics and used this perturbation to elucidate the interspecific interactions among fishers, grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and ringtails (Bassariscus...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Genetic diversity confers colony-level benefits due to individual immunity

Megan Walz, David R. Tarpy & Michael Simone-Finstrom
Several costs and benefits arise as a consequence of eusociality and group-living. With increasing group size, spread of disease among nest-mates poses selective pressure on both individual immunity and group-level mechanisms of disease resistance (social immunity). Another factor known to influence colony-level expression of disease is intracolony genetic diversity, which in honeybees (Apis mellifera) is a direct function of the number of mates of the queen. Colonies headed by queens with higher mating numbers have...

Data from: Phantoms of the forest: legacy risk effects of a regionally extinct large carnivore

Ellinor Sahlén, Sonja Noell, Christopher S. DePerno, Jonas Kindberg, Göran Spong, Joris P. G. M. Cromsigt & Joris P.G.M. Cromsigt
The increased abundance of large carnivores in Europe is a conservation success, but the impact on the behavior and population dynamics of prey species is generally unknown. In Europe, the recolonization of large carnivores often occurs in areas where humans have greatly modified the landscape through forestry or agriculture. Currently, we poorly understand the effects of recolonizing large carnivores on extant prey species in anthropogenic landscapes. Here, we investigated if ungulate prey species showed innate...

Data from: Tracking transcription factor mobility and interaction in Arabidopsis roots with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

Natalie M Clark, Elizabeth Hinde, Cara M Winter, Adam P Fisher, Giuseppe Crosti, Ikram Blilou, Enrico Gratton, Philip N Benfey & Rosangela Sozzani
To understand complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, it is critical to be able to quantitatively analyze protein movement and protein-protein interactions in time and space. During Arabidopsis development, the intercellular movement of SHORTROOT (SHR) and subsequent interaction with its downstream target SCARECROW (SCR) control root patterning and cell fate specification. However, quantitative information about the spatio-temporal dynamics of SHR movement and SHR-SCR interaction is currently unavailable. Here, we quantify parameters including SHR mobility, oligomeric...

Data from: Biologically and diagenetically derived peptide modifications in Moa collagens

Timothy P. Cleland, Elena R. Schroeter & Mary Higby Schweitzer
The modifications that occur on proteins in natural environments over time are not well studied, yet characterizing them is vital to correctly interpret sequence data recovered from fossils. The recently extinct moa (Dinornithidae) is an excellent candidate for investigating the preservation of proteins, their post-translational modifications (PTMs) and diagenetic alterations during degradation. Moa protein extracts were analysed using mass spectrometry, and peptides from collagen I, collagen II and collagen V were identified. We also identified...

Data from: Peptide sequences from the first Castoroides ohioensis skull and the utility of old museum collections for paleoproteomics

Timothy Cleland, Elena Schroeter, Robert Feranec, Deepak Vashishth, Elena R. Schroeter, Timothy P. Cleland & Robert S. Feranec
Vertebrate fossils have been collected for hundreds years and are stored in museum collections around the world. These remains provide a readily available resource to search for preserved proteins; however, the vast majority of paleoproteomic studies have focused on relatively recently collected bones with a well-known handling history. Here, we characterize proteins from the nasal turbinates of the first Castoroides ohioensis skull ever discovered. Collected in 1845, this is the oldest museum curated specimen characterized...

Data from: Paleotropical diversification dominates the evolution of the hyperdiverse ant tribe Crematogastrini (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

Bonnie B. Blaimer, Philip S. Ward, Ted R. Schultz, Brian L. Fisher & Seán G. Brady
Levels of diversity vary strikingly among different phylogenetic lineages of ants. Rapid radiations in early ant evolution have often proven difficult to resolve with traditional Sanger-sequencing data sets of modest size. We provide a phylogenomic perspective on the evolution of the hyperdiverse ant tribe Crematogastrini by analyzing sequence data for nearly 1800 ultraconserved element (UCE) loci from 153 species comprising 56 genera. We reconstruct a next-to-complete genus-level phylogeny using concatenated maximum-likelihood and species-tree approaches, estimate...

Data from: Diversity and evolution of the primate skin microbiome

Sarah E. Council, Amy M. Savage, Julie M. Urban, Megan E. Ehlers, J. H. Pate Skene, Michael L. Platt, Robert R. Dunn & Julie E. Horvath
Skin microbes play a role in human body odour, health and disease. Compared to gut microbes we know comparatively little about the changes in the composition of skin microbes in response to evolutionary changes in hosts, or more recent behavioral and cultural changes in humans. No studies have used sequence-based approaches to consider the skin microbe communities of gorillas and chimpanzees, for example. Comparison of the microbial associates of non-human primates with those of humans...

Data from: Winter coat color polymorphisms identify global hotspots for evolutionary rescue from climate change

L. Scott Mills, Eugenia V. Bragina, Alexander V. Kumar, Marketa Zimova, Diana J.R. Lafferty, Jennifer Feltner, Brandon M. Davis, Klaus Hacklander, Paulo C. Alves, Jeffrey M. Good, Jose Melo-Ferreira, Andreas Dietz, Alexei V. Abramov, Natalia Lopatina & Kairsten Fay
Maintenance of biodiversity in a rapidly changing climate will depend on the efficacy of evolutionary rescue, whereby population declines due to abrupt environmental change are reversed by shifts in genetically-driven adaptive traits. However, a lack of traits known to be under direct selection by anthropogenic climate change has limited the incorporation of evolutionary processes into global conservation efforts. In 22 vertebrate species, some individuals undergo a seasonal color molt from summer brown to winter white...

Data from: The hidden history of the snowshoe hare, Lepus americanus: extensive mitochondrial DNA introgression inferred from multilocus genetic variation

José Melo-Ferreira, Fernando A. Seixas, Ellen Cheng, L. Scott Mills & Paulo C. Alves
Hybridization drives the evolutionary trajectory of many species or local populations, and assessing the geographic extent and genetic impact of interspecific gene flow may provide invaluable clues to understand population divergence or the adaptive relevance of admixture. In North America, hares (Lepus spp.) are key species for ecosystem dynamics and their evolutionary history may have been affected by hybridization. Here we reconstructed the speciation history of the three most widespread hares in North America -...

Data from: The effects of weak genetic perturbations on the transcriptome of the wing imaginal disc, and its association with wing shape in Drosophila melanogaster

Ian Dworkin, Julie A. Brown Anderson, Youssef Idaghdour, Erin Kennerly Parker, Eric A. Stone, Greg Gibson & Julie A. Anderson
A major objective of genomics is to elucidate the mapping between genotypic and phenotypic space as a step toward understanding how small changes in gene function can lead to elaborate phenotypic changes. One approach that has been utilized is to examine overall patterns of co-variation between phenotypic variables of interest, such as morphology, physiology and behavior, and underlying aspects of gene activity, in particular transcript abundance on a genome wide scale. Numerous studies have demonstrated...

Data from: Muscle–spring dynamics in time-limited, elastic movements

Michael V. Rosario, Gregory P. Sutton, Sheila N. Patek & Gregory S. Sawicki
Muscle contractions that load in-series springs with slow speed over a long duration do maximal work and store the most elastic energy. However, time constraints, such as those experienced during escape and predation behaviours, may prevent animals from achieving maximal force capacity from their muscles during spring-loading. Here, we ask whether animals that have limited time for elastic energy storage operate with springs that are tuned to submaximal force production. To answer this question, we...

Data from: Nucleotide variation in the Egfr locus of Drosophila melanogaster

Arnar Palsson, Ann Rouse, Rebecca Riley-Berger, Ian Dworkin & Greg Gibson
The Epidermal growth factor receptor is an essential gene with diverse pleiotropic roles in development throughout the animal kingdom. Analysis of sequence diversity in 10.9 kb covering the complete coding region and 6.4 kb of potential regulatory regions in a sample of 250 alleles from three populations of Drosophila melanogaster suggests that the intensity of different population genetic forces varies along the locus. A total of 238 independent common SNPs and 20 indel polymorphisms were...

Data from: Association between nucleotide variation in Efgr and wing shape in Drosophila melanogaster

Arnar Palsson & Greg Gibson
As part of an effort to dissect quantitative trait locus effects to the nucleotide level, association was assessed between 238 single-nucleotide and 20 indel polymorphisms spread over 11 kb of the Drosophila melanogaster Egfr locus and nine relative warp measures of wing shape. One SNP in a conserved potential regulatory site for a GAGA factor in the promoter of alternate first exon 2 approaches conservative experimentwise significance (P < 0.00003) in the sample of 207...

Great smoky mountain ant community composition

Nathan J. Sanders, Jean-Philippe Lessard & Robert R. Dunn
Disentangling the drivers of diversity gradients can be challenging. The Measurement of Biodiversity (MoB) framework decomposes scale-dependent changes in species diversity into three components of community structure: the species abundance distribution (SAD), the total community abundance, and the within-species spatial aggregation. Here we extend MoB from categorical treatment comparisons to quantify variation along continuous geographic or environmental gradients. Our approach requires sites along a gradient, each consisting of georeferenced plots of abundance-based species composition data....

Development and testing of a novel Killer-Rescue self-limiting gene drive system in Drosophila melanogaster

Maxwell Scott, Sophia Webster & Michael Vella
Here we report the development and testing of a novel self-limiting gene drive system, Killer-Rescue, in Drosophila melanogaster. This system is composed of an auto-regulated Gal4 Killer (K) and a Gal4-activated Gal80 Rescue (R). Overexpression of Gal4 is lethal, but in the presence of R activation of Gal80 leads to much lower levels of Gal4 and rescue of lethality. We demonstrate that with a single 2:1 engineered to wildtype release, K drives R through the...

Molecular prevalence of Bartonella, Babesia, and hemotropic Mycoplasma species in dogs with hemangiosarcoma from across the United States

Erin Lashnits, Pradeep Neupane, Julie Bradley, Toni Richardson, Rachael Thomas, Keith Linder, Matthew Breen & Ricardo Maggi
Hemangiosarcoma (HSA), a locally invasive and highly metastatic endothelial cell neoplasm, accounts for two-thirds of all cardiac and splenic neoplasms in dogs. Bartonella spp. infection has been reported in association with neoplastic and non-neoplastic vasoproliferative lesions in animals and humans. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Bartonella spp. in conjunction with two other hemotropic pathogens, Babesia spp. and hemotropic Mycoplasma spp., in tissues and blood samples from 110 dogs with...

Recurrent mismatch binding by MutS mobile clamps on DNA localizes repair complexes nearby

Keith Weninger, Pengyu Hao, Sharonda J. LeBlanc, Brandon C. Case, Timothy C. Elston, Manju M. Hingorani & Dorothy A. Erie
DNA mismatch repair (MMR), the guardian of the genome, commences when MutS identifies a mismatch and recruits MutL to nick the error-containing strand, allowing excision and DNA resynthesis. Dominant MMR models posit that after mismatch recognition, ATP converts MutS to a hydrolysis-independent, diffusive mobile clamp that no longer recognizes the mismatch. Little is known about the postrecognition MutS mobile clamp and its interactions with MutL. Two disparate frameworks have been proposed: One in which MutS–MutL...

Large losses of ammonium-nitrogen from a rice ecosystem under elevated CO2

Lei Cheng, Chenchao Xu, Kaihang Zhang, Wanying Zhu, Jing Xiao, Chen Zhu, Naifang Zhang, Fangjian Yu, Shuyao Li, Chunwu Zhu, Qichao Tu, Xin Chen, Jianguo Zhu, Shuijin Hu, Roger T Koide & Mary K Firestone
Inputs of nitrogen into terrestrial ecosystems, mainly via the use of ammonium-based fertilizers in agroecosystems, are enormous, but its fate under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is not well understood. We have taken advantage of a 15-year free air CO2 enrichment study to investigate the influence of elevated CO2 on the transformation of ammonium-nitrogen in a rice ecosystem in which ammonium is usually assumed to be stable under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrate that elevated CO2...

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