13 Works

Data from: Utilizing descriptive statements from the Biodiversity Heritage Library to expand the Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology

Katja C. Seltmann, Zsolt Pénzes, Matthew J. Yoder, Matthew A. Bertone & Andrew R. Deans
Hymenoptera, the insect order that includes sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants, exhibits an incredible diversity of phenotypes, with over 145,000 species described in a corpus of textual knowledge since Carolus Linnaeus. In the absence of specialized training, often spanning decades, however, these articles can be challenging to decipher. Much of the vocabulary is domain-specific (e.g., Hymenoptera biology), historically without a comprehensive glossary, and contains much homonymous and synonymous terminology. The Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology was developed...

Data from: Assessment of coyote-wolf-dog admixture using ancestry-informative diagnostic SNPs

Javier Monzón, Roland Kays & Daniel E. Dykhuizen
The evolutionary importance of hybridization as a source of new adaptive genetic variation is rapidly gaining recognition. Hybridization between coyotes and wolves may have introduced adaptive alleles into the coyote gene pool that facilitated an expansion in their geographic range and dietary niche. Furthermore, hybridization between coyotes and domestic dogs may facilitate adaptation to human-dominated environments. We genotyped 63 ancestry-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms in 427 canids in order to examine the prevalence, spatial distribution, and...

Data from: Are shy individuals less behaviorally variable? Insights from a captive population of mouse lemurs

Jennifer L. Verdolin & John Harper
Increasingly, individual variation in personality has become a focus of behavioral research in animal systems. Boldness and shyness, often quantified as the tendency to explore novel situations, are seen as personality traits important to the fitness landscape of individuals. Here we tested for individual differences within and across contexts in behavioral responses of captive mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus) to novel objects, novel foods, and handling. We report consistent differences in behavioral responses for objects and...

Data from: Fossil grebes from the Truckee Formation (Miocene) of Nevada and a new phylogenetic analysis of Podicipediformes (Aves)

Daniel T. Ksepka, Amy M. Balanoff, Michael A. Bell & Michel D. Houseman
Podicipediformes is a cosmopolitan clade of foot-propelled diving birds that, despite inhabiting marine and lacustrine environments, have a poor fossil record. In this contribution, we describe three new grebe fossils from the diatomite beds of the Late Miocene Truckee Formation (10.2 ± 0.2 Ma) of Nevada (USA). Two postcranial skeletons and an associated set of wing elements indicate that at least two distinct grebe species occupied the large, shallow Lake Truckee during the Miocene. Phylogenetic...

Data from: Constraints on mammalian forelimb development: insights from developmental disparity

Darcy L. Ross, Jonathan D. Marcot, Keith J. Betteridge, Nanette Nasone-Yoder, C. Scott Bailey, Karen E. Sears, Darcy Ross & Nanette Nascone-Yoder
Tetrapod limb development has been studied extensively for decades, yet the strength and role of developmental constraints in this process remains unresolved. Mammals exhibit a particularly wide array of limb morphologies associated with various locomotion modes and behaviors, providing a useful system for identifying periods of developmental constraint and conserved developmental mechanisms or morphologies. In this study, landmark-based geometric morphometrics are used to investigate levels and patterns of morphological diversity (disparity) among the developing forelimbs...

Data from: Genomic architecture of adaptive color pattern divergence and convergence in Heliconius butterflies

Megan A. Supple, Heather M. Hines, Kanchon K. Dasmahapatra, James J. Lewis, Dahlia M. Nielsen, Christine Lavoie, David A. Ray, Camilo Salazar, W. Owen McMillan & Brian A. Counterman
Identifying the genetic changes driving adaptive variation in natural populations is key to understanding the origins of biodiversity. The mosaic of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius butterflies makes an excellent system for exploring adaptive variation using next-generation sequencing. In this study, we use a combination of techniques to annotate the genomic interval modulating red color pattern variation, identify a narrow region responsible for adaptive divergence and convergence in Heliconius wing color patterns, and explore the...

Data from: Separating mortality and emigration: modelling space use, dispersal and survival with robust-design spatial-capture-recapture data

Torbjørn Ergon, Xavier Lambin & Beth Gardner
1. Capture-recapture (CR) techniques are commonly used to gain information about population dynamics, demography and life-history traits of populations. However, traditional CR models cannot separate mortality from emigration. Recently developed spatial-capture-recapture (SCR) models explicitly incorporate spatial information into traditional CR models, thus allowing for individuals’ movements to be modelled explicitly. 2. In this paper, we extend SCR models using robust-design data to allow for both processes in which individuals can disappear from the population, mortality...

Data from: Daily blood feeding rhythms of laboratory-reared North American Culex pipiens

Megan L. Fritz, Edward D. Walker, Aaron J. Yunker & Ian Dworkin
Background: Blood feeding by free-living insect vectors of disease is rhythmic and can be used to predict when infectious bites will occur. These daily rhythms can also be targeted by control measures, as in insecticide-treated nets. Culex pipiens form pipiens and C.p. f. molestus are two members of the Culex pipiens assemblage and vectors of West Nile Virus throughout North America. Although Culex species vector human pathogens and parasites, the daily blood feeding rhythms of...

Data from: Environmental harshness is positively correlated with intraspecific divergence in mammals and birds

Carlos A. Botero, Roi Dor, Christy M. McCain & Rebecca J. Safran
Life on Earth is conspicuously more diverse in the tropics. Although this intriguing geographical pattern has been linked to many biotic and abiotic factors, their relative importance and potential interactions are still poorly understood. The way in which latitudinal changes in ecological conditions influence evolutionary processes is particularly controversial, as there is evidence for both a positive and a negative latitudinal gradient in speciation rates. Here, we identify and address some methodological issues (how patterns...

Data from: Predation-associated divergence of male genital morphology in a livebearing fish

Justa L. Heinen-Kay & R. Brian Langerhans
Male genital morphology is remarkably diverse across internally fertilizing animals, a phenomenon largely attributed to sexual selection. Ecological differences across environments can alter the context of sexual selection, yet little research has addressed how this may influence the rapid, divergent evolution of male genitalia. Using the model system of Bahamas mosquitofish (Gambusia hubbsi) undergoing ecological speciation across blue holes, we used geometric morphometric methods to test (i) whether male genital shape (the small, approximately 1...

Data from: Changes in taste neurons support the emergence of an adaptive behavior in cockroaches

Ayako Wada-Katsumata, Jules Silverman & Coby Schal
In response to the anthropogenic assault of toxic baits, populations of the German cockroach have rapidly evolved an adaptive behavioral aversion to glucose (a phagostimulant component of baits). We hypothesized that changes in the peripheral gustatory system are responsible for glucose aversion. In both wild-type and glucose-averse (GA) cockroaches, D-fructose and D-glucose stimulated sugar–gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs), whereas the deterrent caffeine stimulated bitter-GRNs. In contrast, in GA cockroaches, D-glucose also stimulated bitter-GRNs and suppressed the...

Data from: Environmental and historical imprints on beta diversity: insights from variation in rates of species turnover along gradients

Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Nathan J. Sanders, Signe Normand, Jens-Christian Svenning, Simon Ferrier, Aaron D. Gove, Robert R. Dunn, N. J. Sanders, S. Normand, R. R. Dunn, J.-C. Svenning, A. D. Gove & S. Ferrier
A common approach for analysing geographical variation in biodiversity involves using linear models to determine the rate at which species similarity declines with geographical or environmental distance and comparing this rate among regions, taxa or communities. Implicit in this approach are weakly justified assumptions that the rate of species turnover remains constant along gradients and that this rate can therefore serve as a means to compare ecological systems. We use generalized dissimilarity modelling, a novel...

Data from: Evolution of male coloration during a post-pleistocene radiation of Bahamas mosquitofish (Gambusia hubbsi)

Ryan A. Martin, Rüdiger Riesch, Justa Lee Heinen-Kay & R. Brian Langerhans
Sexual signal evolution can be complex because multiple factors influence the production, transmission, and reception of sexual signals, as well as receivers’ responses to them. To grasp the relative importance of these factors in generating signal diversity, we must simultaneously investigate multiple selective agents and signaling traits within a natural system. We use the model system of the radiation of Bahamas mosquitofish (Gambusia hubbsi) inhabiting blue holes to test the effects of resource availability, male...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • North Carolina State University
    13
  • American Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Stony Brook University
    2
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
    1
  • University of Szeged
    1
  • University of Guelph
    1
  • University of Oslo
    1
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    1