18 Works

Data from: The hidden history of the snowshoe hare, Lepus americanus: extensive mitochondrial DNA introgression inferred from multilocus genetic variation

José Melo-Ferreira, Fernando A. Seixas, Ellen Cheng, L. Scott Mills & Paulo C. Alves
Hybridization drives the evolutionary trajectory of many species or local populations, and assessing the geographic extent and genetic impact of interspecific gene flow may provide invaluable clues to understand population divergence or the adaptive relevance of admixture. In North America, hares (Lepus spp.) are key species for ecosystem dynamics and their evolutionary history may have been affected by hybridization. Here we reconstructed the speciation history of the three most widespread hares in North America -...

Data from: Conservation implications of the evolutionary history and genetic diversity hotspots of the snowshoe hare

Ellen Cheng, Karen E. Hodges, José Melo-Ferreira, Paulo C. Alves & L. Scott Mills
With climate warming, the ranges of many boreal species are expected to shift northward and to fragment in southern peripheral ranges. To understand the conservation implications of losing southern populations, we examined range-wide genetic diversity of the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), an important prey species that drives boreal ecosystem dynamics. We analysed microsatellite (8 loci) and mitochondrial DNA sequence (cytochrome b and control region) variation in almost 1000 snowshoe hares. A hierarchical structure analysis of...

Data from: Do males matter? Testing the effects of male genetic background on female meiotic crossover rates in Drosophila melanogaster

Chad M. Hunter & Nadia D. Singh
Meiotic recombination is a critical genetic process as well as a pivotal evolutionary force. Rates of crossing-over are highly variable within and between species, due to both genetic and environmental factors. Early studies in Drosophila implicated female genetic background as a major determinant of crossover rate and recent work has highlighted male genetic background as a possible mediator as well. Our study employed classical genetics to address how female and male genetic backgrounds individually and...

Data from: Challenges in analysis and interpretation of microsatellite data for population genetic studies

Alexander I. Putman & Ignazio Carbone
Advancing technologies have facilitated the ever-widening application of genetic markers such as microsatellites into new systems and research questions in biology. In light of the data and experience accumulated from several years of using microsatellites, we present here a literature review that synthesizes the limitations of microsatellites in population genetic studies. With a focus on population structure, we review the widely used fixation (FST) statistics and Bayesian clustering algorithms and find that the former can...

Data from: Size, sex, and individual-level behavior drive intra-population variation in cross-ecosystem foraging of a top-predator

James C. Nifong, Craig A. Layman & Brian R. Silliman
1. Large-bodied, top-predators are often highly mobile, with the potential to provide important linkages between spatially distinct food webs. What biological factors contribute to variation in cross-ecosystem movements, however, have rarely been examined. 2. Here, we investigated how ontogeny (body size), sex, and individual-level behavior impacts intra-population variation in cross-ecosystem foraging (i.e., between freshwater and marine systems), by the top-predator Alligator mississippiensis. 3. Field surveys revealed A. mississippiensis uses marine ecosystems regularly and are abundant...

Data from: Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution

Bernhard Misof, Shanlin Liu, Karen Meusemann, Ralph S. Peters, Alexander Donath, Christoph Mayer, Paul B. Frandsen, Jessica Ware, Tomas Flouri, Rolf G. Beutel, Oliver Niehuis, Malte Petersen, Fernando Izquierdo-Carrasco, Torsten Wappler, Jes Rust, Andre J. Aberer, Ulrike Aspöck, Horst Aspöck, Daniela Bartel, Alexander Blanke, Simon Berger, Alexander Böhm, Thomas Buckley, Brett Calcott, Junqing Chen … & Xin Zhou
Insects are the most speciose group of animals, but the phylogenetic relationships of many major lineages remain unresolved. We inferred the phylogeny of insects from 1478 protein-coding genes. Phylogenomic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences, with site-specific nucleotide or domain-specific amino acid substitution models, produced statistically robust and congruent results resolving previously controversial phylogenetic relations hips. We dated the origin of insects to the Early Ordovician [~479 million years ago (Ma)], of insect flight...

Data from: Diet specialization in an extreme omnivore: nutritional regulation in glucose-averse German cockroaches

Jonathan Z. Shik, Coby Schal & Jules Silverman
Organisms have diverse adaptations for balancing dietary nutrients, but often face trade-offs between ingesting nutrients and toxins in food. While extremely omnivorous cockroaches would seem excluded from such dietary trade-offs, German cockroaches (Blattella germanica) in multiple populations have rapidly evolved a unique dietary specialization – an aversion to glucose, the phagostimulant in toxic baits used for pest control. We used factorial feeding experiments within the geometric framework to test whether glucose-averse (GA) cockroaches with limited...

Data from: Allopolyploidy and the evolution of plant virus resistance

John W. Gottula, Ramsey Lewis, Seiya Saito & Marc Fuchs
Background: The relationship between allopolyploidy and plant virus resistance is poorly understood. To determine the relationship of plant evolutionary history and basal virus resistance, a panel of Nicotiana species from diverse geographic regions and ploidy levels was assessed for resistance to non-coevolved viruses from the genus Nepovirus, family Secoviridae. The heritability of resistance was tested in a panel of synthetic allopolyploids. Leaves of different positions on each inoculated plant were tested for virus presence and...

Data from: Assessing gene-environment interactions for common and rare variants with binary traits using gene-trait similarity regression

Guolin Zhao, Rachel Marceau, Daowen Zhang, Jung-Ying Tzeng & J.-Y. Tzeng
Accounting for gene-environment (GxE) interactions in complex trait association studies can facilitate our understanding of genetic heterogeneity under different environmental exposures, improve the ability to discover susceptible genes that exhibit little marginal effect, provide insight into the biological mechanisms of complex diseases, help to identify high-risk subgroups in the population, and uncover hidden heritability. However, significant GxE interactions can be difficult to find. The sample sizes required for sufficient power to detect association are much...

Data from: Protein and carbohydrate intake influence sperm number and male fertility in male cockroaches but not sperm viability

Harriet Bunning, James Rapkin, Catharine Ruth Archer, Kim Jensen, John Hunt & Laurence Belcher
It is commonly assumed that because males produce many, tiny sperm, they are cheap to produce. Recent work, however, suggests that sperm production is not cost-free. If sperm are costly to produce, sperm number and/or viability should be influenced by diet, and this has been documented in numerous species. Yet few studies have examined the exact nutrients responsible for mediating these effects. Here, we quantify the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on...

Data from: Key players and hierarchical organization of prairie dog social networks

Jennifer L. Verdolin, Robert R. Dunn & Amanda L. Traud
The use of social network theory in evaluating animal social groups has gained traction in recent years. Despite the utility of social network analysis in describing attributes of social groups, it remains unclear how comparable this approach is to traditional behavioral observational studies. Using data on Gunnison’s prairie dog (Cynomys gunnisoni) social interactions we describe social networks from three populations. We then compare those social networks to groups identified by traditional behavioral approaches and explore...

Data from: Predicting ecological and phenotypic differentiation in the wild: a case of piscivorous fish in a fishless environment

Ryan A. Martin, Matthew D. McGee & R. Brian Langerhans
Environmental variation drives ecological and phenotypic change. How predictable is differentiation in response to environmental change? Answering this question requires the development and testing of multifarious a priori predictions in natural systems. We employ this approach using Gobiomorus dormitor populations that have colonized inland blue holes differing in the availability of fish prey. We evaluated predictions of differences in demographics, habitat use, diet, locomotor and trophic morphology, and feeding kinematics and performance between G. dormitor...

Data from: Genetic architecture of a hormonal response to gene knockdown in honey bees

Kate E. Ihle, Olav Rueppell, Ying Wang, M. Kim Fondrk, , Gro V. Amdam & Zachary Y. Huang
Variation in endocrine signaling is proposed to underlie the evolution and regulation of social life histories, but the genetic architecture of endocrine signaling is still poorly understood. An excellent example of a hormonally influenced set of social traits is found in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): a dynamic and mutually suppressive relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) regulates behavioral maturation and foraging of workers. Several other traits cosegregate with...

Data from: Population structure and diversity of an invasive pine needle pathogen reflects anthropogenic activity

Irene Barnes, Michael J. Wingfield, Ignazio Carbone, Thomas Kirisits & Brenda D. Wingfield
Dothistroma septosporum is a haploid fungal pathogen that causes a serious needle blight disease of pines, particularly as an invasive alien species on Pinus radiata in the Southern Hemisphere. During the course of the last two decades, the pathogen has also incited unexpected epidemics on native and non-native pine hosts in the Northern Hemisphere. Although the biology and ecology of the pathogen has been well documented, there is a distinct lack of knowledge regarding its...

Data from: Re-evaluating neonatal-age models for ungulates: does model choice affect survival estimates?

Troy W. Grovenburg, Kevin L. Monteith, Christopher N. Jacques, Robert W. Klaver, Christopher S. DePerno, Todd J. Brinkman, Kyle B. Monteith, Sophie L. Gilbert, Joshua B. Smith, Vernon C. Bleich, Christopher C. Swanson & Jonathan A. Jenks
New-hoof growth is regarded as the most reliable metric for predicting age of newborn ungulates, but variation in estimated age among hoof-growth equations that have been developed may affect estimates of survival in staggered-entry models. We used known-age newborns to evaluate variation in age estimates among existing hoof-growth equations and to determine the consequences of that variation on survival estimates. During 2001–2009, we captured and radiocollared 174 newborn (≤24-hrs old) ungulates: 76 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus...

Data from: Human-caused habitat fragmentation can drive rapid divergence of male genitalia

Justa L. Heinen-Kay, Holly G. Noel, Craig A. Layman & R. Brian Langerhans
The aim of this study rests on three premises: 1) humans are altering ecosystems worldwide, 2) environmental variation often influences the strength and nature of sexual selection, and 3) sexual selection is largely responsible for rapid and divergent evolution of male genitalia. While each of these assertions has strong empirical support, no study has yet investigated their logical conclusion that human impacts on the environment might commonly drive rapid diversification of male genital morphology. We...

Data from: Genetic basis of continuous variation in the levels and modular inheritance of pigmentation in cichlid fishes

R. Craig Albertson, Kara E. Powder, Yinan Hu, Kaitlin P. Coyle, Reade B. Roberts & Kevin J. Parsons
Variation in pigmentation type and levels is a hallmark of myriad evolutionary radiations, and biologists have long been fascinated by the factors that promote and maintain variation in coloration across populations. Here we provide insights into the genetic basis of complex and continuous patterns of color variation in cichlid fishes, which offer a vast diversity of pigmentation patterns that have evolved in response to both natural and sexual selection. Specifically, we crossed two divergent cichlid...

Data from: Tissue storage and primer selection influence pyrosequencing-based inferences of diversity and community composition of endolichenic and endophytic fungi

Jana M. U'Ren, Jakob M. Riddle, James T. Monacell, Ignazio Carbone, Jolanta Miadlikowska & A. Elizabeth Arnold
Next-generation sequencing technologies have provided unprecedented insights into fungal diversity and ecology. However, intrinsic biases and insufficient quality control in next-generation methods can lead to difficult-to-detect errors in estimating fungal community richness, distributions, and composition. The aim of this study was to examine how tissue storage prior to DNA extraction, primer design, and various quality-control approaches commonly used in 454 amplicon pyrosequencing might influence ecological inferences in studies of endophytic and endolichenic fungi. We first...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • North Carolina State University
    18
  • Duke University
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Porto
    2
  • University of California, Davis
    2
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • University of Hamburg
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig
    1