39 Works

Data from: Bioclimatic envelope models predict a decrease in tropical forest carbon stocks with climate change in Madagascar

Ghislain Vieilledent, Oliver Gardi, Clovis Grinand, Christian Burren, Mamitiana Andriamanjato, Christian Camara, Charlie J. Gardner, Leah Glass, Andriambolantsoa Rasolohery, Harifidy Ratsimba, Valéry Gond & Jean-Roger Rakotoarijaona
1. Recent studies have underlined the importance of climatic variables in determining tree height and biomass in tropical forests. Nonetheless, the effects of climate on tropical forest carbon stocks remain uncertain. In particular, the application of process-based dynamic global vegetation models have led to contrasting conclusions regarding the potential impact of climate change on tropical forest carbon storage. 2. Using a correlative approach based on a bioclimatic envelope model and data from 1771 forest plots...

Data set from Argentinian plots from: 'Untangling the importance of niche breadth and niche position as drivers of tree species abundance and occupancy across biogeographic regions '. Global Ecology and Biogeography 2020. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13139

Dilys M Vela Diaz, Cecilia Blundo, Leslie Cayola, Alfredo F. Fuentes, Lucio R Malizia & Jonathan Myers
Data package for 'Untangling the importance of niche breadth and niche position as drivers of tree species abundance and occupancy across biogeographic regions '. Global Ecology and Biogeography 2020. ABSTRACT Despite decades of interest in how ecological niches shape species commonness and rarity at local and regional scales, the relative importance of different niche mechanisms within and across ecosystems remains unresolved. We tested the relative importance of niche breadth (range of environmental conditions where species...

RAD-seq reveals patterns of diversification, hybridization, and the accumulation of reproductive isolation in a clade of partially sympatric, tropical island trees

Alexander Linan, , Allison Miller, George Schatz, Jean Claude Sevathian & Christine Edwards
A common pattern observed in temperate tree clades is that species are often morphologically distinct and partially interfertile but maintain species cohesion despite ongoing hybridization where ranges overlap. Although closely related species commonly occur in sympatry in tropical ecosystems, little is known about patterns of hybridization within a clade over time, and the implications of this hybridization for the maintenance of species boundaries. In this study, we focused on a clade of sympatric trees in...

Weda, a new genus with two new species of Euphorbiaceae-Crotonoideae from Halmahera (North Moluccas, Indonesia) and phylogenetic relationships of the Australasian tribe Ricinocarpeae

Peter Van Welzen, Susana Arias Guerrero, Deby Arifiani, Tjut Bangun, Roderick Bouman, Marcel Eurlings, Iska Gushilman, Peter Philipson, Iris Tabak, Esmée Winkel & Kenneth Wurdack
Two unknown Euphorbiaceae were discovered during the environmental impact study for a proposed nickel mine behind Weda Bay on Halmahera in the North Moluccas (Maluku Utara Province) of Indonesia. Morphological comparisons and molecular phylogenetic analyses using four markers (plastid trnL-F and rbcL, and nuclear ribosomal ITS and ETS) indicated they should be recognized as constituting a new, distinct genus of two species, which are described and illustrated here as Weda fragarioides and W. lutea. The...

Data from: Annual understory plant recovery dynamics in a temperate woodland mosaic during a decade of ecological restoration

J. Leighton Reid, Nels J. Holmberg, Matthew Albrecht, Sandra Arango-Caro, Olivia Hajek, Quinn Long & James Trager
Temperate woodlands are one of the world’s ecosystems in greatest need of ecological restoration, but relatively little is known about their floristic recovery dynamics over decadal timescales. From 2000 to 2012, we monitored understory plant communities in a woodland mosaic in Missouri, USA, as it underwent restoration via prescribed, dormant-season burning and mechanical thinning of red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) and exotic shrubs. Native species richness increased linearly by 36% over this time period, driven primarily...

Data from: Rules of thumb for predicting tropical forest recovery

Karen D. Holl, John Leighton Reid, Federico Oviedo-Brenes, Andy J. Kulikowski & Rakan A. Zahawi
Natural regeneration is increasingly recognized as a potentially cost‐effective strategy to reach ambitious forest landscape restoration targets, but rates of recovery are notoriously variable. We asked how well initial habitat conditions after cessation of agriculture predict forest recovery after nearly a decade. We aimed to provide land managers with general rules of thumb to assess when it is necessary to invest resources in active restoration, such as tree planting, to accelerate forest recovery. Location: Coto...

Data from: Tropical forest restoration enriches vascular epiphyte recovery

John Leighton Reid, José Miguel Chaves-Fallas, Karen D. Holl & Rakan A. Zahawi
Vascular epiphytes constitute a large proportion of tropical forest plant biodiversity, but are among the slowest plants to recolonize secondary forests. We asked whether tree planting for ecological restoration accelerates epiphyte community recovery. Does the spatial configuration of tree planting matter? What landscape contexts are most suitable for epiphyte restoration? Location: Restored pastures in premontane Coto Brus County, Puntarenas, Costa Rica.

Data from: Diversification patterns in the CES clade (Brassicaceae tribes Cremolobeae, Eudemeae, Schizopetaleae) in Andean South America

Diego Leonel Salariato, Fernando O. Zuloaga, Andreas Franzke, Klaus Mummenhoff & Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz
Dated molecular phylogenetic trees show that the Andean uplift had a major impact on South American biodiversity. For many Andean groups, accelerated diversification (radiation) has been documented. However, not all Andean lineages appear to have diversified following the model of rapid radiation, particularly in the central and southern Andes. Here, we investigated the diversification patterns for the largest South American-endemic lineage of Brassicaceae, composed of tribes Cremolobeae, Eudemeae and Schizopetaleae (CES clade). Species of this...

Data from: The ephemerality of secondary forests in southern Costa Rica

J. Leighton Reid, Matthew E. Fagan, James Lucas, Joshua Slaughter & Rakan A. Zahawi
Secondary forests are increasingly recognized for conserving biodiversity and mitigating global climate change, but these and other desired outcomes can only be achieved after decades of regeneration, and secondary forests are frequently recleared before they recover to predisturbance conditions. We used a time series of aerial photographs (1947-2014) to evaluate multidecadal persistence of secondary forests across a 320 sq. km landscape in southern Costa Rica. Secondary forests had relatively short lifespans, with 50% recleared within...

Data from: A latitudinal gradient in dimensionality of biodiversity

Richard D. Stevens & J. Sebastian Tello
Biodiversity is multifaceted and represents numerous dimensions expressing variation in richness and abundances of species, ecosystem functions, phylogenetic relationships, morphology, traits and interactions. Such dimensions are correlated to varying degrees and recent research has attempted to better understand behavior of such correlations. We define dimensionality of biodiversity as degree of redundancy in variation among multiple dimensions of biodiversity. One fundamental question regarding biodiversity is whether its dimensionality is spatially structured, also exhibiting geographic gradients. We...

Data from: Disturbance alters beta-diversity but not the relative importance of community assembly mechanisms

Jonathan A. Myers, Jonathan M. Chase, Raelene M. Crandall & Iván Jiménez
1.Ecological disturbances are often hypothesized to alter community assembly processes that influence variation in community composition (β-diversity). Disturbance can cause convergence in community composition (low β-diversity) by increasing niche selection of disturbance-tolerant species. Alternatively, disturbance can cause divergence in community composition (high β-diversity) by increasing habitat filtering across environmental gradients. However, because disturbance may also influence β-diversity through random sampling effects owing to changes in the number of individuals in local communities (community size) or...

Data from: Sapwood capacitance is greater in evergreen sclerophyll species growing in high compared to low rainfall environments

Anna E. Richards, Ian J. Wright, Tanja I. Lenz & Amy E. Zanne
1. The capacitative release of water from sapwood allows photosynthesis to continue for longer into dry periods, both diurnally and seasonally. However, costs of high capacitance include increased vulnerability to xylem cavitation. The degree of reliance on stored water is predicted to differ among environments as a result of this trade off 2. Xylem water potential and sapwood capacitance were measured on 32 evergreen sclerophyll shrub and tree species in eastern Australia, sampled from four...

Data from: Anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance and the recovery debt

David Moreno Mateos, Edward B. Barbier, Peter C. Jones, Holly P. Jones, James Aronson, Jose A. Lopez-Lopez, Michelle L. McCrackin, Paula Meli, Daniel Montoya & José Rey Benayas
Ecosystem recovery from anthropogenic disturbances, either without human intervention or assisted by ecological restoration, is increasingly occurring worldwide. As ecosystems progress through recovery, it is important to estimate any resulting deficit in biodiversity and functions. Here we use data from 3,035 sampling plots worldwide, to quantify the interim reduction of biodiversity and functions occurring during the recovery process (that is, the ‘recovery debt’). Compared with reference levels, recovering ecosystems run annual deficits of 46–51% for...

Data from: Does hybridization drive the transition to asexuality in diploid Boechera?

James Benjamin Beck, Patrick J. Alexander, Loreen Allphin, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz, Catherine Rushworth, C. Donovan Bailey & Michael D. Windham
Gametophytic apomixis is a common form of asexual reproduction in plants. Virtually all gametophytic apomicts are polyploids, and some view polyploidy as a prerequisite for the transition to apomixis. However, any causal link between apomixis and polyploidy is complicated by the fact that most apomictic polyploids are allopolyploids, leading some to speculate that hybridization, rather than polyploidy, enables apomixis. Diploid apomixis presents a rare opportunity to isolate the role of hybridization, and a number of...

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