3 Works

Data from: Bioclimatic envelope models predict a decrease in tropical forest carbon stocks with climate change in Madagascar

Ghislain Vieilledent, Oliver Gardi, Clovis Grinand, Christian Burren, Mamitiana Andriamanjato, Christian Camara, Charlie J. Gardner, Leah Glass, Andriambolantsoa Rasolohery, Harifidy Ratsimba, Valéry Gond & Jean-Roger Rakotoarijaona
1. Recent studies have underlined the importance of climatic variables in determining tree height and biomass in tropical forests. Nonetheless, the effects of climate on tropical forest carbon stocks remain uncertain. In particular, the application of process-based dynamic global vegetation models have led to contrasting conclusions regarding the potential impact of climate change on tropical forest carbon storage. 2. Using a correlative approach based on a bioclimatic envelope model and data from 1771 forest plots...

Data from: Diversification patterns in the CES clade (Brassicaceae tribes Cremolobeae, Eudemeae, Schizopetaleae) in Andean South America

Diego Leonel Salariato, Fernando O. Zuloaga, Andreas Franzke, Klaus Mummenhoff & Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz
Dated molecular phylogenetic trees show that the Andean uplift had a major impact on South American biodiversity. For many Andean groups, accelerated diversification (radiation) has been documented. However, not all Andean lineages appear to have diversified following the model of rapid radiation, particularly in the central and southern Andes. Here, we investigated the diversification patterns for the largest South American-endemic lineage of Brassicaceae, composed of tribes Cremolobeae, Eudemeae and Schizopetaleae (CES clade). Species of this...

Data from: Anthropogenic ecosystem disturbance and the recovery debt

David Moreno Mateos, Edward B. Barbier, Peter C. Jones, Holly P. Jones, James Aronson, Jose A. Lopez-Lopez, Michelle L. McCrackin, Paula Meli, Daniel Montoya & José Rey Benayas
Ecosystem recovery from anthropogenic disturbances, either without human intervention or assisted by ecological restoration, is increasingly occurring worldwide. As ecosystems progress through recovery, it is important to estimate any resulting deficit in biodiversity and functions. Here we use data from 3,035 sampling plots worldwide, to quantify the interim reduction of biodiversity and functions occurring during the recovery process (that is, the ‘recovery debt’). Compared with reference levels, recovering ecosystems run annual deficits of 46–51% for...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Missouri Botanical Garden
    3
  • Basque Centre for Climate Change
    1
  • University of Kent
    1
  • University of Wyoming
    1
  • Conservation International
    1
  • Bern University of Applied Sciences
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • Heidelberg University
    1
  • Blue Ventures
    1
  • University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
    1